1993 2.3l Mustang Runs Great, idles great, but stalls and dies when accelerating

Discussion in '2.3L (N/A & Turbo) Tech' started by JagFel15, Jul 19, 2008.


  1. JagFel15

    JagFel15 New Member

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    This is my first post, though I have been an avid reader for quite some time. I'm up against a wall. I have a 1993 Ford Mustang who runs great. Starts fine, Idles even better, and works almost all the time. Except for 15% of the time, when I start to accelarate, she'll start to stall on me. This doesn't happen when I accelerate very slowly, but I have to drive like an old lady taking a full minute to get up to 40 miles an hour. If I go any faster, she'll start to stall, and then catch at the higher throttle position.
    The problem is that the car doesn't do it all the time. Just sometimes, seemingly randomly. I took it to your local podunk auto store and scanned it for codes and came up with
    172,186,211,218,222,223,224. Following up what these meant, I replaced my heated oxygen sensor, Mass Air Flow sensor, Throttle positioning sensor, and Fuel Filter. After doing that, the only codes that I still have remaining are 211, 218, and 222. Not sure about 211 (Ignition PIP circuit fault?), but didn't think that the coil packs could be bad like 218 and 222 insinuate because she idles and run like a dream the rest of the time.
    I also did a key on-engine running test and came up with the codes 411 and 167. #167 tells me that the throttle control is poor during dynamic response, which is exactly the trouble that my car is having, but I don't know how to fix that. And #411 just told me that the test couldn't control the RPMs at low RPM levels.
    In addition to merely replacing the afore mentioned parts, I also cleaned out the throttle body and air intake valves really well on two seperate occasions. The plugs and wires are only about 6,000 miles old. After I got the #167 code, I also replaced my Throttle Position Sensor again just in case I received a bad part, but to no avail. I then started to think it was the fuel pump, but I can hear the fuel pump prime every time I turn on the key and she always starts and runs fine as long as I don't adjust the throttle at all.

    I feel about to give up... at the very least I need to know some solid ideas of where to go next before I spend another $600 on parts that won't fix anything. Please help?:(
  2. RustBucket

    RustBucket New Member

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    The one thing you didn't replace or at least have tested was the ignition control module. 211,218,222,223,224 all hint to the fact the ignition module may be bad.

    Head on back to the podunk auto parts store with the module in hand and ask them to test it. It's another $100 bucks or so to replace it.

    Have you cleared the codes, ran the motor, then scanned again to see if you actually cured anything?
  3. JagFel15

    JagFel15 New Member

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    Yes, I have. Generally, I cleared them after each part I replaced. The only KOEO codes I have remaining are 211, 218, and 222. I will try to see if I can check that. Is there a special test that they have for that, or should it just show up when running codes?

    Also, #211 talks about a missing or erratic Profile Ignition Pickup. I found out this signal comes from the Crankshaft sensor just off my timing belt. Would a missing or erratic PIP itself CAUSE the other two codes (Which mean loss of IDM signal and/or coil pack failures)??
  4. RustBucket

    RustBucket New Member

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    It's possible that the crank sensor has issues. However, I'm thinking if it starts and idles, basic crank sensor function is OK.

    They test the module out of the car. They have a small machine they hook the module to that simulates it's operation in the car. The tester isn't foolproof, but it's all you've got. If it passes the first test, have them test it a couple of additional times to build some heat in the module.
  5. JagFel15

    JagFel15 New Member

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    Thanks. Your advice is the best I've got. I'll look at that first thing tomorrow.
    If I could ask you one more question, is there a chance that it could be something as simple as low fuel pressure? If my fuel pump was just starting to go bad, and my fuel pressure was low, would it give me false sensor readings perhaps, and maybe account for dying when I try to punch it? Maybe I'll have them check fuel pressure as well while they're looking at the ICM.
  6. RustBucket

    RustBucket New Member

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    It wouldn't throw PIP and other ignition related codes if it were the fuel pump. Besides, I've yet to see a fuel pump get weak then fail, they usually just stop working (always with a fuel tank of fuel too :) ).
  7. JagFel15

    JagFel15 New Member

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    Hey, thanks so much for your help! I had the ICM checked out, but it turned out fine. Finally, I decided to test my coil packs. Both checked out in spec, but one was just super hot and definitely on the high side of spec. Replaced that, and she's been running fine ever since....

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