DTC codes p1130 p1131 p1150 p1151

Discussion in 'SN95 4.6L Mustang Tech' started by russell16, Mar 27, 2009.


  1. russell16

    russell16 Member

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    Hey guys, ive done some research by using the search function and also google but i havent found anything of real substance. My codes are


    p1130 - Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Adaptive Fuel Limit - Bank No. 1

    p1131 - Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Sensor Indicates Lean - Bank No. 1

    p1150 - Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Adaptive Fuel Limit - Bank No. 2

    p1151 - Lack of Upstream Heated Oxygen Sensor Switch - Sensor Indicates Lean - Bank No. 2

    What does adaptive fuel at limit mean?

    Since all these codes are coming at the same time i doubt its an O2 sensor because i doubt they would both go bad at the same time.

    On my car i have a CAI, Longtube headers, o/r prochamber and a catback. I also have an SCT tuner from americanmuscle.com to make everything run better (i also had MILs on the rear O2s before the tuner).

    I had the codes p1131 and 1151 before and was told to do the easiest thing which was to clean the MAF (all i did was get MAF cleaner and spray it in there, how would you clean then the connector part?). The codes went away for a couple weeks. I just recently started feeling a rough idle. Doesnt die or anything but it fluctuates, and then the codes came on.

    From what i researched it could be vacuum lines as well. Which lines are vacuum lines? i have no clue. If some one could post a pic of an engine with the vacuum lines circled or something that would be great.

    Do you think it might also just be an IAC? Where do i get a new one of those and instructions on install?

    Might there also be a problem with the tune? Ive got the preformance and economy 93 octane tunes.

    Any help would be amazing. Thanks.
  2. hotcobra03

    hotcobra03 Active Member

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    o2 codes

    2003 PCED OBD SECTION 2: Diagnostic Methods
    Procedure revision date: 12/19/2002

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Adaptive Fuel DTCs Diagnostic Techniques
    Adaptive Fuel DTCs Diagnostic Techniques help isolate the root cause of the adaptive fuel concern. Before proceeding, attempt to verify if any driveability concerns are present. These diagnostic aids are meant as a supplement to the pinpoint test steps in Section 5. For a description of fuel trim, refer to Section 1 , Powertrain Control Software, Fuel Trim.

    Obtain Freeze Frame Data

    Freeze Frame Data can be helpful in duplicating and diagnosing adaptive fuel concerns. This data (a snapshot of certain PID values, recorded at the time the DTC was stored in Continuous Memory) is helpful to determine how the vehicle was being driven when the fault occurred, and can be especially useful on intermittent concerns. Freeze Frame Data, in many cases, can help to isolate possible areas of concern as well as rule out others. Refer to Freeze Frame Data in this section for a more detailed description of this data.

    Using the LONGFT1 and LONGFT2 (dual bank engines) PIDs

    The LONGFT1/2 PIDs can be useful for diagnosing fuel trim concerns. A negative PID value indicates that fuel is being reduced to compensate for a rich condition, while a positive PID value indicates that fuel is being increased to compensate for a lean condition. It is important to know that there is a separate LONGFT value that is used for each rpm/load point of engine operation. When viewing the LONGFT1/2 PIDs, the values may change a great deal as the engine is operated at different rpm and load points. This is because the fuel system may have learned corrections for fuel delivery concerns that can change as a function of engine rpm and load. The LONGFT1/2 PIDs will display the fuel trim currently being used at that rpm and load point. Observing these changes in LONGFT1/2 can help when diagnosing fuel system concerns. For example:

    A contaminated MAF sensor would result in matching LONGFT1/2 correction values that are negative at idle (reducing fuel), but positive (adding fuel) at higher rpm and loads.
    LONGFT1 values that differ greatly from LONGFT2 values would rule out concerns that are common for both banks (for example, fuel pressure concerns, MAF sensor, etc. could be ruled out).
    Vacuum leaks would result in large rich corrections (positive LONGFT1/2 value) at idle, but little or no correction at higher rpm and loads.
    A plugged fuel filter will result in no correction at idle, but large rich corrections (positive LONGFT1/2 value) at high rpm and load.
    Resetting Long Term Fuel Trims

    Long term fuel trim corrections can be reset by resetting the PCM Keep Alive Memory (KAM). Refer to Resetting Keep Alive Memory in this section to reset KAM. After making a fuel system repair, KAM must be reset. For example, if dirty/plugged injectors cause the engine to run lean and generate rich long term corrections, replacing the injectors and not resetting KAM will now make the engine run very rich. The rich correction will eventually be "learned out" during closed loop operation, but the vehicle may have poor driveability and have high CO emissions while it is learning.

    P0171/P0174 System Too Lean Diagnostic Aids

    Note: If the system is lean at certain conditions, then the LONGFT PID would be a positive value at those conditions, indicating that increased fuel is needed.

    The ability to identify the type of lean condition causing the concern can be crucial to a correct diagnosis.

    Air Measurement System:

    With this condition, the engine may actually run rich or lean of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air/fuel ratio) if the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is not able to compensate enough to correct for the condition. One possibility is that the mass of air entering the engine is actually greater than what the MAF sensor is indicating to the PCM. For example, with a contaminated MAF sensor, the engine would run lean at higher rpm because the PCM would deliver fuel for less air than is actually entering the engine.

    Examples: MAF sensor measurement inaccurate (corroded connector, contamination/dirty (a contaminated MAF sensor will typically result in a rich system at low airflows (PCM will reduce fuel) and a lean system at high airflows (PCM will increase fuel), etc).

    Vacuum Leaks/Unmetered Air:

    With this condition, the engine may actually run lean of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air/fuel ratio) if the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is not able to compensate enough to correct for the condition. This condition can be caused by unmetered air entering the engine, or due to a MAF malfunction. In this situation, the volume of air entering the engine is actually greater than what the MAF sensor is indicating to the PCM. Vacuum leaks will normally be most apparent when high manifold vacuum is present (for example, during idle or light throttle). If freeze frame data indicates that the fault occurred at idle, a check for vacuum leaks/unmetered air might be the best starting point.

    Examples: Loose, leaking or disconnected vacuum lines, intake manifold gaskets or o-rings, throttle body gaskets, brake booster, air inlet tube, stuck/frozen/aftermarket PCV valve, unseated engine oil dipstick, etc.

    Insufficient Fueling:

    With this condition, the engine may actually run lean of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air/fuel ratio) if the PCM is not able to compensate enough to correct for the condition. This condition can be caused by a fuel delivery system concern that restricts or limits the amount of fuel being delivered to the engine. This condition will normally be most apparent when the engine is under a heavy load and at high rpm, when a higher volume of fuel is required. If freeze frame data indicates that the fault occurred under a heavy load and at higher rpm, a check of the fuel delivery system (checking fuel pressure with engine under a load) might be the best starting point.

    Examples: low fuel pressure (fuel pump, fuel filter, fuel leaks, restricted fuel supply lines), fuel injector concerns, etc.

    Exhaust System Leaks:

    In this type of condition, the engine may actually be running rich of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air / fuel ratio) because the fuel control system is adding fuel to compensate for a perceived (not actual) lean condition. This condition is caused by oxygen (air) entering the exhaust system from an external source. The HO2S will react to this exhaust leak by increasing fuel delivery. This condition will cause the exhaust gas mixture from the cylinder to be rich.

    Examples: Exhaust system leaks upstream or near HO2S, poorly welded/leaking HO2S boss, malfunctioning Secondary Air Injection system, etc.

    P0172/P0175 System Too Rich Diagnostic Aids

    Note: If the system is rich at certain conditions, then the LONGFT PID would be a negative value at that airflow, indicating that decreased fuel is needed.

    System rich concerns are usually caused by fuel system concerns, although the MAF sensor, and base engine (for example, engine oil contaminated with fuel) should also be checked.

    Air Measurement System:

    With this condition, the engine may actually run rich or lean of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air/fuel ratio) if the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is not able to compensate enough to correct for the condition. One possibility is that the mass of air entering the engine is actually less than what the MAF sensor is indicating to the PCM. For example, with a contaminated MAF sensor, the engine would run rich at idle because the PCM would deliver fuel for more air than is actually entering the engine.

    Examples: MAF sensor measurement inaccurate (corroded connector, contamination/dirty (a contaminated MAF sensor will typically result in a rich system at low airflows (PCM will reduce fuel) and a lean system at high airflows (PCM will increase fuel), etc.).

    Fuel System:

    With this condition, the engine may actually run rich of stoichiometry (14.7:1 air/fuel ratio) if the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) is not able to compensate enough to correct for the condition. This situation can be caused by a fuel delivery system that is delivering excessive fuel to the engine.

    Examples:

    Fuel pressure regulator causes excessive fuel pressure (system rich at all airflows)(fuel pressure can be intermittent, going to pump deadhead pressure, then returning to normal after engine is turned off then restarted).
    Fuel pressure regulator vacuum hose off (causes excessive fuel pressure at idle, system rich at idle airflows).
    Fuel pressure regulator diaphragm ruptured (fuel leaking into intake manifold, system rich at lower airflows).
    Fuel return line crimped/damaged (fuel pressure high, system rich at lower airflows).
    Fuel injector leaks (injector delivers extra fuel).
    EVAP canister purge valve leak (if canister is full of vapors, introduces extra fuel).
    Fuel rail pressure sensor (electronic returnless fuel systems) concern causes sensor to indicate lower pressure than actual. PCM commands higher pressure to the fuel pump driver module (FPDM), causing high fuel pressure (system rich at all airflows).
    Base Engine

    Engine oil contaminated with fuel can contribute to a rich running engine.




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    H40 DTCs P1131, P1132, P1151, P1152, P2195, P2196, P2197 AND P2198: UPSTREAM HO2S NOT SWITCHING.
    Note: It is necessary to address all Continuous Memory Ignition and Misfire DTCs, if received during Continuous Memory testing, before addressing any KOER HO2S DTCs.

    DTC/HO2S Reference List:

    HO2S-11 = DTCs P1131, P1132, P2195 and P2196
    HO2S-21 = DTCs P1151, P1152, P2197 and P2198
    Check intake air system for leaks, obstructions and damage.
    Check air cleaner element, air cleaner housing for blockage.
    Verify integrity of the PCV system.
    Check for vacuum leaks.
    Were any concerns found during inspection?
    Yes No
    REPAIR as necessary. GO to DC25 .
    DC25 DTC P0171, P0172, P0174, P0175, P1131, P1132, P1151, P1152, P1130, P1150, P2195, P2196, P2197, P2198 OR LEAN DRIVEABILITY CONCERNS: CHECK CONDITIONS RELATED TO MAF SENSOR
    Note: Most weather service reports are a local barometric pressure that has been corrected to sea level. However, the BARO PID reports the actual barometric pressure for the altitude the vehicle is being diagnosed in. Local weather conditions (high or low pressure areas) will change the local barometric pressure by several inches of mercury [+/- 3 Hz. (+/- 1 in.Hg.)].

    Verify the MAF sensor is connected. If not, repair as necessary.
    Key on, engine running.
    Access the BARO, LONGFT1, LONGFT2 and MAF V PIDs on fully warmed-up engine.
    Check that the BARO PID is approximately the same as the barometric pressure reading for the location, day and altitude the vehicle is being diagnosed at.
    BARO PID values in Keep Alive Memory require updating at high throttle openings. If vehicle is driven down from higher altitudes for diagnosing, complete three or four heavy accelerations at greater than half-throttle to allow BARO PID to update.
    BARO PID must be within +/- 6 Hz. (+/- 2 in.Hg.) of the altitude value in Barometric Pressure Reference Chart (at the beginning of this pinpoint test).
    Make BARO PID comparisons to Barometric Pressure Reference Chart or daily airport barometric pressure reports, if available.
    Check that the LONGFT1 and LONGFT2 PIDS for all injector banks at idle is not more negative than -12%.
    Check that the MAF V PID at idle and neutral is not greater than 30% of the normal MAF V listed in Section 6 , Reference Values (or not greater than 1.1 volts).
    Are two of the above three checks OK?
    Yes No
    For DTC P0171, P0172, P0174, P0175, P1131, P1132, P1151, P1152, P1130, P1150, P2195, P2196, P2197 or P2198 : GO to H42 (or GO to HA42 for natural gas vehicles only). For driveability symptoms without DTCs : RETURN to Section 3 , Symptom Charts for further diagnosis. KEY OFF. GO to DC26 .

    DC26 CHECK TO ISOLATE MAF SENSOR FROM LEAN DRIVEABILITY OCCURENCE
    Note: Due to increasingly stringent emission/OBD II requirements, a fuel system DTC on some vehicles will be generated without a noticeable driveability concern with or without the MAF sensor disconnected. Under these conditions, if the BARO, LONGFT1, LONGFT2 and MAF V PID indicates a MAF sensor concern, replace the MAF sensor.

    Disconnect the MAF sensor.
    Key on, engine running.
    Drive the vehicle.
    Is the lean driveability symptom (lack of power, spark knock/detonation, buck/jerk or hesitation/surge on acceleration) gone?


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  3. Night Shifter

    Night Shifter Well-Known Member

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    damn man where do you find all this info?
  4. squeak93

    squeak93 Active Member

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    Google is ur friend......
  5. hotcobra03

    hotcobra03 Active Member

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    from ford service disc.....fwiw most sites ive searched only gives descriptions on codes and than you have to buy into site for the real information your looking for..some threads have links into sites that they were paying for but you can only get what they posted.....here is what i get from you codes..your o2s are at thier limit for switching (lean to rich) and you fuel trim is stuck...i use my predator for reading fuel trims,,than that points you in the direction of problem..air/fuel/vaccum,,,i dont think po1130/1150 are bad o2s but i could be wrong...do you know someone with a sct/predator..you can still use them without being married to your car....good luck
  6. russell16

    russell16 Member

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    Ive got a sct x3, how could i use that to figure out what will fix the problem?
  7. hotcobra03

    hotcobra03 Active Member

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    go into data logging.(real time data).a bunch of numbers will appear,,you can use that in koeo/koer...good luck.... no really in data logging it shows what all of you sensors are doing,and you read them and compare ,,its really cool and easy ,i just self taught myself ,my spelling is next... pm me an email i can pass on some stuff to help you learn,than with that and some other stangnet freaks can help you out, when or if you get stuck..

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