EGR vacuum at idle?

Discussion in 'Fox 5.0 Mustang Tech' started by pro50gt, Oct 7, 2008.

  1. pro50gt

    pro50gt New Member

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    Hey guys, I cant remember but is there supposed to be vacuum to the EGR at idle? Because when I start my car, it doesnt want to idle very well. and as soon as I take the vacuum line off the EGR it cleans up. There is vacuum in that line at idle, but if I remember right...there ISNT supposed to be...Thanks for any help.
     
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  2. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL
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    There isn't supposed to be any vacuum at the EGR at idle.

    Some basic theory to clarify how things work is in order…

    EGR System theory and testing

    The EGR shuts off at Wide Open Throttle (WOT), so it has minimal effect on performance. The addition of exhaust gas drops combustion temperature, increases gas mileage and reduces the tendency of the engine to ping. It can also reduce HC emissions by reducing fuel consumption. The primary result of EGR usage is a reduction in NOx emissions.

    The EGR system has a vacuum source (line from the intake manifold) that goes to the EVR, computer operated electronic vacuum regulator. The EVR is located on the back of the passenger side shock strut tower. The computer uses RPM, Load. and some other factors to tell the EVR to pass vacuum to open the EGR valve. The EGR valve and the passages in the heads and intake manifold route exhaust gas to the EGR spacer (throttle body spacer). The EGR sensor tells the computer how far the EGR valve is open. Then computer adjusts the signal sent to the EVR to hold, increase or decrease the vacuum. The computer adds spark advance to compensate for the recirculated gases and the slower rate they burn at.


    [​IMG]

    Troubleshooting:
    There should be no vacuum at the EGR valve when at idle. If there is, the EVR (electronic vacuum regulator) mounted on the backside of the passenger side wheelwell is suspect. Check the vacuum line plumbing to make sure the previous owner didn’t cross the vacuum lines.

    Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds. (the diagram says 88 GT, but the EGR part is the same for 86-93 Mustangs)
    [​IMG]

    The EGR sensor is basically a variable resistor, like the volume control on a radio. One end is 5 volt VREF power from the computer (red/orange wire). One end is computer signal ground (black/white), and the middle wire (brown/lt green) is the signal output from the EGR sensor. It is designed to always have some small voltage output from it anytime the ignition switch is the Run position. That way the computer knows the sensor & the wiring is OK. No voltage on computer pin 27 (brown/lt green wire) and the computer thinks the sensor is bad or the wire is broken and sets code 31. The voltage output can range from approximately .6-.85 volt.

    The EVR regulates vacuum to the EGR valve to maintain the correct amount of vacuum. The solenoid coil should measure 20-70 Ohms resistance. The regulator has a vacuum feed on the bottom which draws from the intake manifold. The other vacuum line is regulated vacuum going to the EGR valve. One side of the EVR electrical circuit is +12 volts anytime the ignition switch is in the run position. The other side of the electrical circuit is the ground path and is controlled by the computer. The computer switches the ground on and off to control the regulator solenoid.



    EGR test procedure courtesy of cjones

    to check the EGR valve:
    bring the engine to normal temp.
    connect a vacuum pump to the EGR Valve
    apply 5in vacuum to the valve.
    if engine stumbled or died then EGR Valve and passage(there is a passageway through the heads and intake) are good.
    if engine did NOT stumble or die then either the EGR Valve is bad and/or the passage is blocked.
    if engine stumbled, connect vacuum gauge to the hose coming off of the EGR Valve
    snap throttle to 2500 RPM (remember snap the throttle don't hold it there).
    did the vacuum gauge show about 2-5 in vacuum?

    if not, check for manifold vacuum at the EGR vacuum valve.
    if you have manifold vacuum then connect vacuum gauge to the EGR valve side of the vacuum valve and snap throttle to 2500 RPM.
    should read about 2-5 in vacuum

    To test the computer, you can use a test light across the EVR wiring connectors and dump the codes. When you dump the codes, the computer does a self test that toggles every relay/actuator/solenoid on and off. When this happens, the test light will flicker.

    Late Model Restoration has the Ford Racing M-12071-N302 kit with the EGR valve & sensor along with the ACT & ECT sensors for $45. See * * * N/A * * * 86-93 SENSOR KIT, 5.0L EFI, INCLUDES EGR VALVE & SENSOR, COOLANT TEMP SENSOR, & AIR CHARGE TEMP SENSOR MUSTANG for more details
     
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  3. pro50gt

    pro50gt New Member

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    THANK YOU! :)
     
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  4. archistang

    archistang New Member

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    Hey guys, sorry to thread-jack here but I think you're talking about a similar problem I'm having. When I was last under the hood of my car there was a vacuum hose that was not connected to anything. Its coming off the top port of the EGR Vacuum Regulator, and I'm not sure where it goes.

    I've got a post here

    Random Unplugged Wire - Corral Forums

    with pictures of my description. Can you lend some insight?

    Thanks,
     
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  5. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL
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    Look closely at the EGR System Operation diagram I posted. You will find your answer there.
     
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  6. aar0s

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    that goes to the egr valve, you have it highlighted in the pics.
     
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  7. archistang

    archistang New Member

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    Thanks guys, I appreciate the help. So it does go to the EGR Vacuum Operated Valve Actuator, which is shown in Jrichkter's EGR Operation Diagram, and highlighted in my photos, right?

    thanks again.
     
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  8. archistang

    archistang New Member

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    Thanks guys, I appreciate the help. So it does go to the EGR Vacuum Operated Valve Actuator, which is shown in Jrichkter's EGR Operation Diagram, and highlighted in my photos, right?

    thanks again.
     
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  9. archistang

    archistang New Member

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    Thanks guys, I appreciate the help. So it does go to the EGR Vacuum Operated Valve Actuator, which is shown in Jrichkter's EGR Operation Diagram, and highlighted in my photos, right?

    thanks again.
     
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  10. aar0s

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    yeh, it does. that diagram that richker posted is handy as a shirt pocket. come to think of it i should start to right click, save as some of those things he posts...
     
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