Engine Code Help

Discussion in 'Fox 5.0 Mustang Tech' started by golf4283, May 11, 2013.


  1. golf4283

    golf4283 Active Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    39
    So I got my EFI 5.0 up and running and just pulled the codes. I'm using an rjm harness so I think some are relate to removal of the smog and egr stuff but I just need some help figuring out what needs fixing. I'm having rough start problems. Here's the koeo codes.

    81
    82
    85
    84

    10

    96

    Thanks for any help!

    Also just ran a koer test and it gave me code 6 for cylinders. Is something wrong with my ECM?
    #1
  2. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2000
    Messages:
    21,459
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    134
    With no emissions control, the 8x series codes are to be expected. If you don't have a cat converter H pipe, they can be ignored. Just expect the car to sink like gasoline, since the Thermactor air system, the cat converters and the fuel tank vent system eliminate that problem.

    The code 10 is a spacer code that pops up before the rest of the codes start to be dumped.

    The 6 code for the cylinder count is an anomaly that occurs in many of the 5.0 Fox body cars. Someone at Ford coded it wrong and it is meaningless.

    The 96 code is a fuel pump electrical problem. Since you didn't list the year model of your car, I can't give you the correct code definition and wiring diagrams. Repost with the car year and I will post the proper code definition and wiring diagrams

    Here's some additional help on running a cylinder balance test that may help find some of your problems.

    Cylinder balance test: use this to find dead or weak cylinders:

    Revised 25 March 2012 to add necessity allowing the KOEO tests to finish before starting the engine and the need for a properly functioning IAB/IAC to run the cylinder balance test.

    The computer has a cylinder balance test that helps locate cylinders with low power output. You’ll need to dump the codes out of the computer and make sure that you have the A/C off, clutch depressed to the floor and the transmission in neutral. Fail to do this and you can’t do the engine running dump codes test that allows you to do the cylinder balance test.

    Here's the way to dump the computer codes with only a jumper wire or paper clip and the check engine light, or test light or voltmeter. I’ve used it for years, and it works great. You watch the flashing test lamp or Check Engine Light and count the flashes.

    Be sure to turn off the A/C clutch depressed to the floor, and put the transmission in neutral when dumping the codes. Fail to do this and you will generate a code 67 and not be able to dump the Engine Running codes.


    Here's how to dump the computer codes with only a jumper wire or paper clip and the check engine light, or test light or voltmeter. I’ve used it for years, and it works great. You watch the flashing test lamp or Check Engine Light and count the flashes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If your car is an 86-88 stang, you'll have to use the test lamp or voltmeter method. There is no functional check engine light on the 86-88's except possibly the Cali Mass Air cars.

    [​IMG]

    The STI has a gray connector shell and a white/red wire. It comes from the same bundle of wires as the self test connector.

    89 through 95 cars have a working Check Engine light. Watch it instead of using a test lamp.

    [​IMG]

    The STI has a gray connector shell and a white/red wire. It comes from the same bundle of wires as the self test connector.


    WARNING!!! There is a single dark brown connector with a black/orange wire. It is the 12 volt power to the under the hood light. Do not jumper it to the computer test connector. If you do, you will damage the computer.

    What to expect:
    You should get a code 11 (two single flashes in succession). This says that the computer's internal workings are OK, and that the wiring to put the computer into diagnostic mode is good. No code 11 and you have some wiring problems. This is crucial: the same wire that provides the ground to dump the codes provides signal ground for the TPS, EGR, ACT and Map/Baro sensors. If it fails, you will have poor performance, economy and drivability problems

    Some codes have different answers if the engine is running from the answers that it has when the engine isn't running. It helps a lot to know if you had the engine running when you ran the test.

    Dumping the Engine Running codes: The procedure is the same, you start the engine with the test jumper in place. Be sure the A/C is off, clutch depressed to the floor and the transmission is in neutral. You'll get an 11, then a 4 and the engine will speed up to do the EGR test. After the engine speed decreases back to idle, it will dump the engine running codes.

    Trouble codes are either 2 digit or 3 digit, there are no cars that use both 2 digit codes and 3 digit codes.

    Cylinder balance test

    If you have idle or IAC/IAB problems and the engine will not idle on its own without mechanically adjusting the base idle speed above 625-750 RPM, this test will fail with random cylinders pointed out every time it runs. The IAC/IAB must be capable of controlling the engine speed to run in the 1400-1600 RPM range. Playing with the base idle speed by adjusting it upwards will not work, the computer has to be able to control the engine speed using the IAC/IAB.

    Warm the car's engine up to normal operating temperature. Use a jumper wire or paper clip to put the computer into test mode. Let it finish the Key On Engine Off (KOEO) code dump. Start the engine and let it go through the normal diagnostic tests, then quickly press the throttle to the floor. Remember to keep the clutch pedal (5 speed) depressed to the floor during the test. The engine RPM should exceed 2500 RPM's for a brief second. The engine RPM's will increase to about 1450-1600 RPM and hold steady. The engine will shut off power to each injector, one at a time. When it has sequenced through all 8 injectors, it will flash 9 for everything OK, or the number of the failing cylinder such as 2 for cylinder #2. Quickly pressing the throttle again up to 2500 RPM’s will cause the test to re-run with smaller qualifying figures.
    Do it a third time, and if the same cylinder shows up, the cylinder is weak and isn’t putting out power like it should. See the Chilton’s Shop manual for the complete test procedure


    Do a compression test on all the cylinders.
    Take special note of any cylinder that shows up as weak in the cylinder balance test. Low compression on one of these cylinders rules out the injectors as being the most likely cause of the problem. Look at cylinders that fail the cylinder balance test but have good compression. These cylinders either have a bad injector, bad spark plug or spark plug wire. Move the wire and then the spark plug to another cylinder and run the cylinder balance test again. If it follows the moved wire or spark plug, you have found the problem. If the same cylinder fails the test again, the injector is bad. If different cylinders fail the cylinder balance test, you have ignition problems or wiring problems in the 10 pin black & white electrical connectors located by the EGR.

    How to do a compression test:
    Only use a compression tester with a screw in adapter for the spark plug hole. The other type leaks too much to get an accurate reading. Your local auto parts store may have a compression tester to rent. If you do mechanic work on your own car on a regular basis, it would be a good tool to add to your collection.

    With the engine warmed up, remove all spark plugs and prop the throttle wide open with a plastic screwdriver handle between the throttle butterfly and the throttle housing. Crank the engine until it the gage reading stops increasing. On a cold engine, it will be hard to tell what's good & what's not. Some of the recent posts have numbers ranging from 140-170 PSI. If the compression is low, squirt some oil in the cylinder and do it again – if it comes up, the rings are worn. There should be no more than 10% difference between cylinders. Use a blow down leak test (puts compressed air inside cylinders) on cylinders that have more than 10% difference.

    I generally use a big screwdriver handle stuck in the TB between the butterfly and the TB to prop the throttle open. The plastic is soft enough that it won't damage anything and won't get sucked down the intake either.

    A battery charger (not the trickle type) is a good thing to have if you haven't driven the car lately or if you have any doubts about the battery's health. Connect it up while you are cranking the engine and it will help keep the starter cranking at a consistent speed from the first cylinder tested to the last cylinder.

    See the link to my site for details on how to build your own blow down type compression tester.
    #2
  3. golf4283

    golf4283 Active Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    39
    The engine is in my '65 mustang. So that doesn't help. I have the RJM injection harness.

    302 bored .040
    Comp xe274 cam
    Gt40 iron heads
    Gt40 intake
    75mm maf calibrated w/ 24lb injectors.
    75mm throttle body
    LT headers
    #3
  4. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2000
    Messages:
    21,459
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    134
    I kind of thought that was the case. Being that I have no idea of how you wired the electric fuel pump circuit, here's both sets of diagrams.

    My best guesst is that since this was a mass air conversion type operation that the 86-90 code 96 and diagrams are the best choice. There is an extra wire that gets run that may not be part of the conversion harness.Connect it up or add it in and the 96 code goes away in most cases. It ran from the pink/black wire on the fuel pump relay to pin 19 on the computer.

    The following is a view from the computer side of the computer wiring connector: it is for an A9L, A9P computer.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Code 96 for 86-90 model 5.0 Mustang – KOEO- Fuel pump monitor circuit shows no power - Fuel pump relay or battery power feed was open - Power / Fuel Pump Circuits. The fuel pump lost power at some time while the ignition switch was in the run position. The main power feed to the pump is what is losing power.

    Look for a failing fuel pump relay, bad connections or broken wiring. The fuel pump relay is located under the passenger seat. On Mass Air Conversions, the signal lead that tells the computer that the fuel pump has power may not have been wired correctly.
    See http://www.stangnet.com/tech/maf/massairconversion.html

    [​IMG]

    Look for power at the fuel pump - the fuel pump has a connector at the rear of the car with a pink/black wire and a black wire that goes to the fuel pump. The pink/black wire should be hot when the test connector is jumpered to the test position. . To trick the fuel pump into running, find the ECC test connector and jump the connector in the lower RH corner to ground.
    [​IMG]

    86-90 Models:
    Using the diagram, check the red/black wire from the fuel pump relay: you should see 12 volts or so. If not, check the inertia switch: on a hatch it is on the drivers side by the taillight. Look for a black rubber plug that pops out: if you don't find it, then loosen up the plastic trim. Check for voltage on both sides of the switch. If there is voltage on both sides, then check the Pink/black wire on the fuel pump relay: it is the power feed to the fuel pump. Good voltage there, then the fuel pump body to tank wiring harness connector is the likely culprit since it is getting power. No voltage there, check the Orange/Lt blue wire, it is the power feed to the fuel pump relay & has a fuse link in it. Good voltage there & at the Pink/black wire, swap the relay.

    Keep in mind that the relay wiring and socket can also cause intermittent problems. Clean the relay socket with non-flammable brake parts cleaner or electrical contact cleaner. If you find damaged wiring at the relay socket, replacement pigtail socket assemblies are available at the auto parts stores. Be sure to solder the wires and cover the solder joints with heat shrink tubing if you replace the relay socket.


    [​IMG]



    Code 96 causes & tests 91-93 models. – KOEO- Fuel pump monitor circuit shows no power - Fuel pump relay or battery power feed was open - Power / Fuel Pump Circuits. The fuel pump circuit lost power at one time or another.

    Revised 07-apr-2013 to add check for corrosion and damage in fuel pump relay socket

    Clear the codes by disconnecting the battery and turning on the headlights for about 5 minutes before reconnecting the battery. This will clear any remaining codes. Drive the car for several days and dump the codes again. In many cases, this clears the 96 code.

    Look for a failing fuel pump relay, bad connections or broken wiring. The fuel pump relay is located under the Mass Air Meter on Fox bodied stangs built after 91. On earlier model cars is under the passenger seat. On Mass Air Conversions, the signal lead that tells the computer that the fuel pump has power may not have been wired correctly. See Mustang Mass Air Conversion | StangNet

    Diagram of the fuel pump wiring for 91-93 cars.
    [​IMG]

    Look for power at the fuel pump - the fuel pump has a connector at the rear of the car with a pink/black wire and a black wire that goes to the fuel pump. The pink/black wire should be hot when the test connector is jumpered to the test position. To trick the fuel pump into running, find the ECC test connector and jump the connector in the lower RH corner to ground. No voltage when jumpered, check the fuel pump relay and fuse links.

    [​IMG]


    Power feed: Look for 12 volts at the pink/black wire (power source for fuel pump relay). No voltage or low voltage, bad fuse link, bad wiring, or connections. Remember that on 92 or later models the fuel pump relay is located under the Mass Air meter. Watch out for the WOT A/C control relay on these cars, as it is located in the same place and can easily be mistaken for the fuel pump relay.

    Relay: Turn on the key and jumper the ECC test connector as previously described. Look for 12 volts at the dark green\yellow wire (relay controlled power for the fuel pump). No voltage there means that the relay has failed, or there is a broken wire in the relay control circuit. Be sure to closely check the condition of the relay, wiring & socket for corrosion and damage.

    [​IMG]

    91-93 Models:
    Using the diagram, check the dark green/yellow wire from the fuel pump relay: you should see 12 volts or so. If not the relay has failed or is intermittent. Check the inertia switch: on a hatch it is on the drivers side by the taillight. Look for a black rubber plug that pops out: if you don't find it, then loosen up the plastic trim. Check for voltage on both sides of the switch. If there is voltage on both sides, then check the Pink/black wire on the fuel pump relay: it is the power feed to the fuel pump. Good voltage there, then the fuel pump is the likely culprit since it is getting power. No voltage there, check the Pink/black wire, it is the power feed to the fuel pump relay & has a fuse link in it. Good voltage there & at the dark green/yellow wire, swap the relay.

    All testing is done with the ignition switch in the Run position. Do not forget this crucial step.

    The pink/black wire s should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the fuel pump has opened up.

    With the test jumper in place the green/yellow wire should be the same voltage as the pink/black wire +/- 0.25 volt.

    If not, look at the red wire: should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt.
    If not, then check the yellow wire on the EEC relay located on top of the computer. This one is hard to get to. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the computer has opened up.

    If the red wire does not have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt and the yellow wire on the EEC relay does, then check the red/green wire on the EEC relay. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the ignition switch is defective or the fuse link in the ignition wiring harness has opened up, or the EEC relay is defective.

    All testing is done with the ignition switch in the Run position. Do not forget this crucial step.

    The pink/black wire s should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the fuel pump has opened up.

    With the test jumper in place the green/yellow wire should be the same voltage as the pink/black wire +/- 0.25 volt.

    If not, look at the red wire: should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt.
    If not, then check the yellow wire on the EEC relay located on top of the computer. This one is hard to get to. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the computer has opened up.

    If the red wire does not have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt and the yellow wire on the EEC relay does, then check the red/green wire on the EEC relay. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the ignition switch is defective or the fuse link in the ignition wiring harness has opened up, or the EEC relay is defective.

    Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds
    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. scoozy58

    scoozy58 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    7
    On the above schematic, #49 is an orange wire; in the engine bay along my firewall, coming from the large round white connecting bundle, I have a clipped orange wire measuring roughly 4 volts in the run position. Any idea what this is? Or any good wiring diagram sources? Thanks.
    #5
  6. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2000
    Messages:
    21,459
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    134
    49 wire? Which diagram?
    What year car?
    #6
  7. scoozy58

    scoozy58 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    7
    jrichker 29 april 2012 is under the diagram- it shows on this page.
    #7
  8. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2000
    Messages:
    21,459
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    134
    That's the wire side of the computer wiring harness connector...

    I still don’t know what year car you have. Did I miss something somewhere?

    Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 88-91 Mass Air Mustangs
    [​IMG]

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 91-93 Mass Air Mustangs
    [​IMG]


    #49 is the O2 sensor heater ground: it is a must for proper O2 sensor operation. The O2 sensor heaters have their own ground (HEGO ground) coming from the computer. This is different and separate from the O2 sensor ground. It is an orange wire with a ring terminal on it. It is located in the fuel injector wiring harness and comes out under the throttle body. It gets connected to a lower intake manifold bolt or bolt on back of the cylinder head.

    See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/ Everyone should bookmark this site.

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 91-93 Mass Air Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 88-91 Mass Air Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

    Ignition switch wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif

    Fuel, alternator, A/C and ignition wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif


    Vacuum diagram 89-93 Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxFordVacuumDiagram.jpg

    HVAC vacuum diagram
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Mustang_AC_heat_vacuum_controls.gif

    TFI module differences & pin out
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/TFI_5.0_comparison.gif

    Fuse box layout
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/MustangFuseBox.gif

    87-92 power window wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustang87-92 PowerWindowWiring.gif

    93 power window wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustang93PowerWindows.gif
    #8
  9. scoozy58

    scoozy58 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    7
    it's a 1989 and it's a solid orange, no tracer, wire. with the new IAC and throttle body/TPS installed, the drivability issues have smoothed out.....but I would still like to know what this loose wire is. the p.o. used what looks like lamp cord and speaker wire to 'rig' his own interior lite and stereo, so there are some mysterious doings afoot.
    #9
  10. scoozy58

    scoozy58 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    7
    ok, veryuseful.com shows an orange wire, #49, and calls it a HEGO ground- BUT, my orange wire produces 4 volts in the run position, so, I don't want to ground a 'hot' wire, right?
    #10
  11. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2000
    Messages:
    21,459
    Likes Received:
    338
    Trophy Points:
    134
    It is the ground for the O2 sensor heaters. The voltage you are getting is the result of it not being grounded.

    Automotive circuits are mostly simple stuff: a power source, a connection path, a control device, a load, and a ground.
    The battery/alternator is the positive power source.
    The wire and fuses are the connection path.
    Control devices are switches, relays and sensors.
    A load is a light, motor, solenoid, relay coil or heater element.
    In automotive circuits, grounds are the return path so the electrical power can flow from the load to the negative side of the power source.
    Electricity flows like water:
    Voltage is like pressure,
    Current in amps is like volume,
    Resistance is like the kink you put in a garden hose to decrease the pressure or volume.
    Power is pressure multiplied by volume or voltage multiplied by current (amps)

    Digest that, and you just got the first 3 days of Electricity 101.

    Use some jumper wires (connection path and ground) to hook up a switch (control device), a battery (power source), a light bulb (load). Now make the light turn on and off with the switch.

    That's the electrical lab for the first week of Electricity 101. People pay hundreds of dollars and sit in hard chairs in a stuffy classroom to learn what I just told you for free. So smile, you just got an expensive lesson for free

    For free automotive electrical training, see Automotive Training and Resource Site . I have personally reviewed the material and it is very good. If you are new to automotive electrical troubleshooting, I highly recommend you spend a hour or so going through the material. You'll save at least that much time troubleshooting problems.
    #11
  12. scoozy58

    scoozy58 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    7
    oh, I am always smiling when I get the benefit of your knowledge! really, thankyou very much, I have just had one stupid question after another and you and the guys have been great @ helping me figure this baby out; much obliged for your patience and willingness to help, thankyou!
    #12

Share This Page