Gear Drives

Discussion in '1994 - 1995 Specific Tech' started by eddienyr, Dec 5, 2003.

  1. Is that what replaces the chain?

    if so, it would probably cut out the sloppyness.

    Since chains have their "tight" and "loose" spots.

    Thats just a guess :shrug:
     
  2. That replaces your timing chain. No more worries about losing a timing chain. If you timing chain breaks when the motor is running, serious damage can occur (blow a head gasket/piston rings/etc)

    I had to stare at that thing for 10 minutes to figure it out. Then I looked at the suggested stuff to go with it.....timing cover gasket! Then it dawned on me.

    I don't know what is up with the "noise level" thing. Why would you want it to be noisy?
    Scott
     
  3. Yeah, there timing gears. The "noisy" almost sound like a supercharger.
     
  4. OMG, that is too ricey for me!

    Anyone seen those things you stick in your exhaust tip and it supposedly makes your car sound like you have a turbo! I want one of those!!! :lol:
     
  5. so is it a better set up than stock?
     
  6. That is Gear drive,....I have it on my 76 Cobra II.No more stretched chains, or worrying about broken chains and possible valvetrain damage. I would love to put it on my 95 but i was told gear drive will not work because the noise of the unit screws up the knock sensor :shrug:
     
  7. I have one on my car. It sounds like crap. They are a waste of money. If you break a timing chain then you are making some serious power or something else is wrong. Just get a multi-indexed Timing chain and you will be good. BTW 94-95 GT's don't have knock sensors.
     
  8. Odds are, you where told that by a GM guy.

    Fact is, NONE of the 5.0 stangs have knock sensors.
    Why do you think that detonation is such a problem for us?

    And yes, it does sound a bit like a supercharger.
     
  9. One problem (other than noise...if that IS a problem for you. I personally like the sound.) is b/c there is no give in the set up like a chain has, will transfer more of the "shock" of the bottom end to the entire valvetrain. SO some times valve train adjustments tend to work out of whack. If that sound wierd, I understand but think of it like this. Everytime a cylinder fires, it basically "hammers" the piston back down...its not exactly gentle. That initial "bang's" shock is sent through the valvetrain easier via a geardrive as opposed to a chain. I would just go with a multi-indexed double roller timing chain. If you're breaking those...good on ya.