Is this a ok starter welder?

Discussion in '1979 - 1995 (Fox, SN95.0, & 2.3L) -General/Talk-' started by Igofaster13, Feb 17, 2007.


  1. Igofaster13

    Igofaster13 Member

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    Ok, Kinda looking for a welder to just learn with. Is this a ok welder to start out with? I have only used a gun style welder, Is it much harder to work with a arc welder? Is this a good deal for $50

    Thanks
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  2. ExplodingGopher

    ExplodingGopher New Member

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    what kind of work will you be doing with this? exhaust and maybe subframes? if so, invest $119 into harbor freight's 90amp flux core gasless mig welder, i've had one for about 3 years now and have done all my hand made exhausts with it if i couldn't weld it at work. Stick welding can be difficult, but doable (with practice) depending on what rod is used. But i'd start out with a MIG or flux cored MIG first.

    And yes, im a professional TIG welder, been there done that with everything from oxy-fuel welding to TIG.
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  3. carbed87

    carbed87 New Member

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    same here, i've been tested in everything from oxy-fuel to tig (though im not the best at welding aluminum lol) and would say that getting a small FCAW machine would be your best bet. however, SMAW is a little better to work with imo, no slag to chip off and the welds turn out a lot cleaner.
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  4. niklid05

    niklid05 New Member

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    will this work well and give nice clean welds? I was thikning about getting it but I figured it was junk... Just save my money and get a Lincoln. My dad used to be a pipeline welder for Sunoco, and thats all he has or ever used. He Has a little lincoln mig welder (110?) and loves using it around the shop.
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  5. bynummustang

    bynummustang Seen my other Jackstand?

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    Being able to burn rods is easy, but welding properly is more difficult.

    I'm taking the bend test in a few weeks, as well as getting cert. in uphill.
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  6. Foxfan88

    Foxfan88 My Grandpa has great wood.

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    a good solid wire or Flux cored machine. alot of machines can interchange to solid wire or FC.

    i wouldnt stick weld for hobby purposes, makes a mess and the slag can be hard to get off with an unexpierenced welder. get cold lap and imcomplete fusion and slag gets trapped and hard as hell to get out with chipping hammers and u have to get a grinder with a wire wheel and by that point its time wasted.

    a tig would work great and is fun. you can really take pride in your work and make some nice welds if u practice. but its overkill for exhaust work, its something that will get dirty and wont be seen so its overkill for mild fabricating.

    now if your doing some hardcore turbo fabrication and making your own pipe a tig is what you need.

    your best bet is a small mig, like a millermatic. solid wire will be cleaner, Flux cored creates slag but it pretty much falls off so its hardly an issue.

    consider you workplace. do you have a nice indoor shop. if so start out with solid wire, there will be no wind and air to blow away your cover gas then you save yourself the time cleaning up Flux cored welds. FCAW runs a little hotter than solid wire, with solid wire you get a smaller heat affected zone.

    if your stuck outside get the FCAW, wind will blow away cover gases and you need to flux to keep the metal from oxidizing.
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