Overheating Problem - '97 Cobra

Discussion in 'SVT Tech Forum' started by 5.0 Nostalgia, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. 5.0 Nostalgia

    5.0 Nostalgia Member

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    I just got the oil cooler replaced on my '97 Cobra. Now the car seems to be overheating. The temperature on the gauge will go up to just short of the overheating point on the gauge, then start to go down. At this point, the low coolant light will come on. This car is my daily driver so I need to fix this soon. I am much more knowledgeable on the 5.0 platform than the DOHC, so I don't really understand this cooling system. I am guessing that the person that replaced the oil cooler either didn't replace the coolant or the system has air in it.

    Thanks for your help.
     
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  2. Thomas Morrison

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    Air in the cooling system would be my guess
     
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  3. txredgt

    txredgt Well-Known Member

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    These cars are known to have head cooling issues. Can you determine if it had the coolant crossover fixed? Mine does not I believe however it does have an upgraded rad to keep it cooler. It's not my DD but I still see the temps climb higher than I would like to during normal driving even.
     
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  4. 95PGTTech

    95PGTTech Member

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    Start with air in the system - common if not bled correctly post-repair.

    Let it cool down to ice cold.
    Jack up the front of the car (you're creating a high spot for the air).
    open the degas bottle
    remove the bleeder fitting on the coolant crossover (in front of intake manifold black pipe, uses 1/4" ratchet extension)

    fill the degas bottle to the recommended cold line, start engine. run heat at full blast.
    watch bleeder provision - when fluid starts to come out, cap it.
    do the same with the degas bottle, or if engine comes up to operating temp and heat works, fill it to hot line and cap it.
    let jack out, take for test drive, repeat if necessary. sometimes you will get a random pocket in one of the heater core lines or lower hose with all those bends so if repeat is necessary, squeeze hoses a lot during warm up phase.

    while you're in there, do the obvious other checks - fans coming on, leaks, etc?
     
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