Power Steering Pump removal and install guide

Discussion in '2.3L (N/A & Turbo) Tech' started by n8rsk8r, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    Okay “the MUCH anticipated Power Steering Pump Replacement guide” by n8rsk8r

    (footnote)
    I decided to make a guide because I like to do this sort of thing, and to help others out is really cool too. I started this project thinking it was going to be a breeze. It really is a breeze if you know EXACTLY what a power steering system is supposed to act like on our vehicles. Example; I did not know that the lines can/are supposed to move side to side after install. I spent the better part of the night trying to troubleshoot why they were moving. Hell, I thought that like any other fitting, they are supposed to be tight. Not so my friend. The problem comes when the metal line moves up and down in the threaded fitting, not side-to-side. Oh man I wish I knew that going into this project. Another thing that baffled me was the O-ring issue. The instructions that come with this pump SUCK. They are REALLY uninformative. I tried to back up these with a Haynes manual. No luck there, they were just the, take the pulley off, now remove the lines, and next remove the bolts. Okay, okay that is all well and good, but nowhere does it get technical, i.e.. your lines will move once tightened, or you don’t need to do anything with all these O-rings we give you to confuse you. LOL

    ***WHAT YOU WILL NEED FOR THIS PROJECT***

    - 15/16” combo box/open end wrench (USE: Pressure Fitting on P/S pump)
    - 17mm combo box/open end wrench (USE: 2 - Alternator bolts)
    - 9/16” combo box/open end wrench (USE: 1 – right hand side for P/S pump-end going to bracket)
    - 18mm open end wrench (USE: the pressure line going from pump to rack, the fittings that are threaded into rack)
    - 5/8” box end wrench (USE: Idler Pulley bolt – to release pressure so you can take the belt off/on)
    - 17mm deep well socket (USE: 2 – Alternator bolts, left hand side for P/S pump-end going to bracket)
    - 1/2" mid-deep socket (USE: taking off/ reinstalling P/S pump pressure line bracket to the side of Radiator overflow bottle.)
    - 1 - 3/8” ratchet
    - 1 - dead blow hammer
    - Rags - tons o’ rags
    - 2 - 32 oz bottles Power steering fluid
    - 6 cans – brake cleaner
    - Pulley Puller/Installer Kit
    - 1 - flat head screwdriver
    - 1 - P/S pump-end (minus the reservoir)
    - 1 - P/S filter
    - 1 - P/S pressure line
    - 1 - P/S return line (non pressurized)
    - 4 - small hose clamps


    Okay here is a P/S pump-end without reservoir:

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    I took the time and taped the part up (first I had to clean the unit, there was A LOT of fluid all over it from shipping!) after the vital areas were covered (all areas that would be in the pump reservoir and the shaft area) I sprayed the P/S pump-end with paint-stripper. It took about half a can (in 4 coats) helping the stripper in between coats with both a wire brush and paper towels (BTW use chemical gloves while doing this, that stuff is NASTY! Oh and has chemicals that “in the state of California have been known to cause cancer” <- I guess if you don’t live in Cali, then you don’t have to worry bout it?!?!)

    Here is the P/S pump-end stripped of paint:

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    A look at the P/S pump-end and how I masked it off, this is after it is fully painting and waiting to dry:

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    Okay I took all the extra tape off, leaving the spot where the fluid pick up is, there is still quite a bit of fluid in it from remanufacturing:

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    I am going to skip to when I took the old P/S pump out and separated the reservoir from the old pump-end (I will show that later on). I wanted to paint the original reservoir because that stale ass yellow color is for the birds. Here I have taped the reservoir off and am about to paint it:

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    Okay here are a couple pics of my progress through the painting. I was holding on by the tape, and yep you guessed it, the tape came off making me put my fingures right into the fresh paint. Needless to say, there were a couple sand/ recoat /wet sandings done on it to pull my fingerprints outta the paint:

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    I used the oven to help dry the paint. I put it on warm, which is 170degrees F, opening the door and taped the reservoir to the door. It worked excellently!!
     
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  2. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    Here is the reservoir with the tape removed:

    [​IMG]

    I took the time and painted the unit (because who wants to be ordinary? Also the ****ty black paint sucks and will come off anyway.) Ford Blue. Another reason I painted it was to match it to my new steering rack. I am going to scuff the paint on the steering racks metal tubes, and paint them white, but here is a look:

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    **Okay, I decided to just cover the P/S pump assembly now and go to the nuts and bolts later in this write up.**

    Okay, this is what you will see when you get your P/S pump-end outta the box. It comes with the unit, 4 bags of goodies and a little one-piece sheet telling you some extremely important—yet highly vague info. Go figure.

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    Another view of the goods:

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    I separated the O-rings for a better view.

    Fist I installed the big O-ring around the P/S pump-end. This O-ring is to seal the pump-end to reservoir. This was simple, oh BTW go over the backside, the part above that is taped (it is easier that way and I am sure is better for the O-ring, less stretching is involved).

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    Since I was making this guide, I thought I would actually kind of take the pump-end apart to document it better, and to see what it is made of.

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    I wanted to note that one of the baggies o’ goodies that has the four O-rings in it is to rebuild the pressure fitting. I found that two O-rings fit the old pressure fitting off my old pump. I guess there is a different style of pressure fitting that takes different sizes/types of O-rings; they include these to give you a chance to re-O-ring your old pressure fitting if you need to.

    As you can see, inside the P/S pump-end there is a spring and a piston. The pressure fitting to the right is the bolt that actually goes through a hole in the reservoir and into the P/S pump-end and pushes/compresses the piston to compress the spring inside the unit. This is a weak compression; the spring has more travel left after this is in.

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    Here is a ****ty pic of the piston, it actually has al lil screen that is domed on the bottom (this side faces inward through the spring and is held in by the pressure fitting; notice the lip by my fingers, that is the spring-stop/perch) BTW that clock time is AM, I worked all night on this damn thing!!! :

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    Okay, once I put the guts back in, I installed the newly painted reservoir onto the P/S pump-end. And you thought the whole time P/S meant Power Steering? No man…. Papa Smurf! Notice the pressure fitting that looks black in the pic. That is the bolt/nut that goes through the reservoir and into the pump-end (pushing on the piston –compressing the spring). The outside nut-end of the pressure fitting is 15/16”. That coffee maker’s time is off by like -4 hours! Yeah it was late and I was tired as hell.

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    **A special note** the lip around the reservoir is what I hit to release it from the old unit. I used a dead blow hammer to do this. It was simple, and it came off pretty easily. I just went around the old pump tapping it till I could just pull it apart by hand. DO I NEED TO TELL YOU TO BE OVER AN OIL PAN OR THE LIKE???? I DIDN’T THINK SO! LOL There is a bunch of fluid left inside it still.

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    Okay, that about covers the installation of the reservoir to the P/S pump-end. Now for the tear apart and reinstallation.


    ((will update, still need to write it!:nice: )
     
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  3. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    The sequel to the “the MUCH anticipated Power Steering Pump Replacement guide” by n8rsk8r


    ***WHAT YOU WILL NEED FOR THIS PROJECT***

    - 15/16” combo box/open end wrench (USE: Pressure Fitting on P/S pump)
    - 17mm combo box/open end wrench (USE: 2 - Alternator bolts)
    - 9/16” combo box/open end wrench (USE: 1 – right hand side for P/S pump-end going to bracket)
    - 18mm open end wrench (USE: the pressure line going from pump to rack, the fittings that are threaded into rack)
    - 5/8” box end wrench (USE: Idler Pulley bolt – to release pressure so you can take the belt off/on)
    - 17mm deep well socket (USE: 2 – Alternator bolts, left hand side for P/S pump-end going to bracket)
    - 1/2" mid-deep socket (USE: taking off/ reinstalling P/S pump pressure line bracket to the side of Radiator overflow bottle.)
    - 1 - 3/8” ratchet
    - 1 - dead blow hammer
    - Rags - tons o’ rags
    - 2 - 32 oz bottles Power steering fluid
    - 6 cans – brake cleaner
    - Pulley Puller/Installer Kit
    - 1 - flat head screwdriver
    - 1 - P/S pump-end (minus the reservoir)
    - 1 - P/S filter
    - 1 - P/S pressure line
    - 1 - P/S return line (non pressurized)
    - 4 - small hose clamps


    ***I changed both the lines (the pressure line: the line that comes from the P/S pump to the rack – has a threaded pressure fitting at both ends. And the return line: a line that is attached from the rack to the nipple on the bottom of the P/S pump reservoir, it is attached via hose clamps.) I also put a P/S pump filter inline on the return side. For this you need a flat head screwdriver and a 1/2" mid-deep well socket and 3/8” ratchet. ***

    The P/S pump is the lower right hand pulley. The one above it to the left is the tensioner pulley (the bolt size is 5/8”). Here is our target:
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    This is the pulley puller installer kit I used. It worked well:
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    Here is an exploded view of the puller:

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    It has a metal step/bearing that is screwed onto a hardened stud:

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    Two half collars go around the step/bearing piece and around the inner part of the pulley that is machined to mate with this:

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    You have to back the stud out to allow for pulley and puller to mate:

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    Putting the halves together:

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    Putting the metal sleeve over the halves:

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    A sleeve then goes around the two halves to keep them together pushed on all the way:

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    Two wrenches are used to pull the pulley. What was nice about this is that you can rest the inner wrench against the battery tray. I would watch this though; it was bending the batter tray in that spot. I was really too tired to care, and I saw it wasn’t cracking or damaging it any:

    [​IMG]

    ***DANGER KNUCKLE DAMAGE ALMOST UNAVOIDABLE DURING THIS PROCEEDURE!!!!***
    Which pulley is most likely to get ya? Just take your pick!!:

    [​IMG]

    A lot of times it seems as if the engineers sit back and laugh at us. It is like they look at a part on the car, see what space is available, and make the part the most impossible to work on! Well look at this! Someone was using his or her noggin! Couldn’t have asked for a better clearance!:

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    Next step is to disconnect the P/S pressure switch (the switch screws into the pressure line):

    [​IMG]


    ((the rest to come today, tired going to bed))
     
    #3
  4. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    Here it is disconnected:

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    I used a 18mm open-end wrench to take the pressure line off. This screws into the pressure line fitting which is threaded through the reservoir into the P/S pump. No need to take the pressure line fitting out, you will do that later.

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    Here you can see the pressure line is off. Make sure the pan is below you; it will drip pretty good from here until you remove the P/S pump.

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    Well after getting the P/S switch disconnected, it was time to take the front bolts off. TOP:

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    ((Notice how dirty this is?)) I used a 3/8” ratchet and a 17mm deep well socket for the left two bolts. BOTTOM:

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    I used a 9/16” boxed end wrench to take the right hand sided bolt out, the deep well sockets were too long, with ratchet was into the engine coolant over flow bottle:

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    AH HA!!! Finally got the lil booger out!

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    I used a TON of brake fluid cleaner to clean the engine up a bit, looky!:

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    When I decided to fix the P/S pump, I thought It would be retarded to put all that effort and money into a new pump and let the rack destroy it will all the old fluid and who knows what all else that is floating in it. I got to talking with a buddy of mine about it, he suggested me looking into getting a transmission filter they put on the newer F350s. I went into AutoZone and they actually had a filter for our P/S pumps listed! Damn, another good idea I have had, just a little too late :D The filter was $17.99. That is the one they had in stock. There were actually two other choices; both had to be ordered. One of those was $12.99, and the other was $22.99. They had this one, so I took it. Precious coffee was lost during the filming of this picture:nonono: :

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    BTW I went to Napa and bought my hoses. The return line was more than enough to do the job. In fact I could have done the job twice with the amount of hose they gave me. A lil FYI!:

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    I mocked the hose up to find the correct length, here the hose has been cut. I have already secured the filter’s hose clamps using a flat-head screwdriver:

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    Trying to make life easy as possible, I positioned the clamp to be the easiest to tighten once on the fitting that is attached to the rack:

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    Now all is left is to attach and tighten the hose clamp. Here it is done:

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    Another view:

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    Look where the filter is, not a bad place at all! I don’t have the P/S pump in yet so that is next.

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    Before I could do this, I had to put the P/S pump together, so this is when I actually completed the breakdown and reassembly of the pump you saw in the first part of the write up. Here I have put the pump in place and put the bolts in loosely:

    [​IMG]


    ((to be continued))
     
    #4
  5. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    I think that Ford Blue is dead sexy in the engine bay, don’t you agree?:nice: :

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    I tightened the bolts down:

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    It was during this time that I ran into a huge mental block. It was late, I wasn’t aware that the movement in the pressure line was okay. I read the note that came with this one lil bushing. The note read: The enclosed new rubber O-ring must be used to replace the old O-ring on the pressure fitting or the unit will leak. Be sure to clean the fitting before replacing the O-ring to ensure a good seal:

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    I noticed that it could fit on the pressure hose end:

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    I tried it, but it didn’t make sense. The nipple end on the hose is too tall for it to seal there, it wouldn’t actually be sealing anything. And the hose still moved with it on. I took it off. A blurry view is below:

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    I decided to switch to the new pressure hose I had for the new rack. I installed the new hose on that end, the new one moved also, but not up and down in the pressure fitting, just side to side. I have asked around and that is the money ticket I guess. Since I was installing the new hose, I had to install the pressure switch onto it. I noticed the metal plug that was on it out of the box had an O-ring that size on it! So I found out what that lil O-ring was, that note above makes no sense now knowing this:

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    The new hose is attached to P/s pump, hard to tell I know. Bad lighting and flash!:

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    A view looking down the area where the P/S hose(s) travel. There is a mounting bracket that is just to the right of the engine coolant overflow bottle. This is a strap type mount. The mount was dipped in rubber or something like rubber. There is only one bolt that holds this mount. The bolt size is a 1/2" and will need a deep well socket. The new hose is a lil bit smaller OD than the OEM piece I was taking off. Also, the new hose has a fabric mesh winding around the hose; the OEM hose was fatter and had a rubber/silicone slick outer surface. The power steering pressure switch is in the lower left corner on the old hose:

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    I reattached the P/S pressure switch:

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    In the P/S pump-end kit, there is also a cheap pulley installer setup consisting of a bolt, a square nut and one washer. I didn’t use this because the design was bad, and I already had good one in the kit above. I did use the bolt though. The bolt in the kit was too long and would not fit in the recessed area on the engine coolant overflow bottle. I just used the installer bearing/nut that came with the pulley puller installer kit and the bolt outta the cheap kit and waalaah! It was a perfect fit!:

    [​IMG]

    I reinstalled the pulley. You want to take the outer pulley surface flush to the P/S pump shaft. I took the top connector to the DIS module off at this time:

    [​IMG]

    I reinstalled the alternator. It took a 17mm socket and a ratchet to put the two bolts on. I need to replace the shield that is supposed to be on the alternator. I rerouted the belt onto the pulleys. I pulled the tensioner pulley back using a 5/8 box end wrench, and set the belt on the P/S pump pulley:

    [​IMG]

    I installed the return line on, tightened the hose clamp with a flat head screwdriver. I then took the return line (coming from the rack) off at the filter. I positioned this line to shoot liquid into the pan. Here I am deciding how to position the hose:

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    I reconnected my battery and added some fluid into the P/S pump reservoir. When I took the top DIS module connector off I was making sure there would be no fire to the cylinders when cranking the engine. You crank the engine a few times to help circulate P/S fluid through the rack to flush it. I read that you are not to exceed 15 seconds at a time (overheat the starter):

    [​IMG]

    I cranked the engine a few times, you are supposed to do it tell it is clear, I was running out of fluid so mine didn’t get all the way clear. I still have the filter on now, so that will help with catching the stuff. I am going to get some help when I install my new rack, then I will run it till it is clear, I will use a filter on this line from here on out! I need to get some pics of the P/S pressure line at the rack. It was a pain in the ass to put on! I think Ford Engineers lost points with me on that one~! This took me a long time to do, the time was really spent doing a step, wiping my hands taking a pic, then doing another (repeat, repeat, repeat......). I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!


    * * Please Let Me Know If I Missed Anything!!! * *

    -n8rsk8r

    a.k.a. Nathan:SNSign:
     
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  6. RustBucket

    RustBucket New Member

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    Good job!! Now go get some sleep :)
     
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  7. n8rsk8r

    n8rsk8r New Member

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    OH I did! Now I need a beer:nice:

    BTW...

    ###soon to come###

    Steering Rack w/ Offset Bushings install guide
    Racer Walsh Bumpsteer Kit install guide
    Qa1 Tublular K-Member install guide
    Qa1 Caster Camber install guide
    Qa1 Coilover install guide
    Flaming River Steering Shaft install guide
    Mac Upper and Lower Control Arm install guide
    Sperical Upper Control Arm to Diff. Bearing install guide
    Intrax Rear Lowering Spring install guide

    ..amoung others :D
     
    #7
  8. Mustang power

    Mustang power New Member

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    Nice job.
    Where do you get the seals from, I'm also intrested where I can get a seal set for the steering rack.
    I have mine rebuild a year ago (I live in Europe) and it costed me about $380 to have both the pump and rack done.
    The guy doesnt want to tell me where he gets the seals and he says that there is no seal kit available and he has to but all the seals separate.
     
    #8
  9. sarah day

    sarah day New Member

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    what size wrench do you use for the pressure line?[
     
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