spark plug change

Discussion in '2005 - 2009 Specific Tech' started by 01White5spd, Sep 6, 2008.


  1. 01White5spd

    01White5spd Founding Member

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    I only have 3k miles on my '07 and I am planning on pulling the plugs to use anti-seize on them to prevent the TSB. Any tips? I don't think I will need penetrating oil since they are so new.
     
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  2. 88GTtom

    88GTtom Member

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    you should be good. aluminum expands when warmed up so warm the car up so the engine is warm to the touch and then take them off. i took mine off at 5200 miles and they still looked nasty, no penetrating fluid even tho i bought some. you will need a 9/16th spark plug socket to remove them. i used this one:
    Amazon.com: OTC 6900 Specialty Spark Plug Socket for Ford F-150 Triton Engine: Automotive
    i used nickel anti seize, the best kind to use, has a higher temp rating.
    also, make sure you vacume any debre that is laying around/on top of the coils so it does not fall into the spark plug hole and into the engine when the plugs are removed.
    where in NJ are you?
     
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  3. 01White5spd

    01White5spd Founding Member

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    Thanks for the advice.
    BTW, I live in Princeton, NJ
     
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  4. klaw

    klaw Member

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    I used a regular deep 9/16 socket and then a short piece of vacuum tubing to push over the loose plug and pull it out.

    I changed mine at about the same mileage (during supercharger install) and they came out really easy.
     
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  5. skyhazzard

    skyhazzard Member

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    Ok, just courious, why change the plugs so early? I have an 07 with 6K, is there something I am missing?
     
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  6. NastyStang113

    NastyStang113 New Member

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    There have been a few cases of plugs getting seized in the heads. People/Dealers will try to remove them and end up breaking them. Ford has created a special tool to remove the broken plugs. It works most of the time. However, some times it doesn't and the whole head has to be pulled. So it's a good idea to pull them out and apply Nickel Anti-Seize on them, and ONLY nickel anti-seize.
     
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  7. cave diver

    cave diver Member

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    Here is the TSB:

    FORD: 2004-2008 F-150
    2005-2008 Expedition, F-Super Duty
    LINCOLN: 2005-2008 Navigator
    2006-2008 Mark LT
    2005-2007 4.6 Mustang GT


    This article supersedes TSB 06-15-2 to update Vehicle Applications, Service Procedure and Part List.

    ISSUE:
    Some 2004-2008 F-150, 2006-2008 Mark LT, 2005-2008 F-Super Duty, Expedition, and Navigator vehicles built with a 5.4L 3-V engine and has a engine built date before 10/9/2007, may experience difficulty with spark plug removal. This may cause damage to the spark plug and leave part of the spark plug in the cylinder head.

    ACTION:
    Refer to the following Service Procedure for techniques to remove the spark plugs and extract broken spark plugs.

    SERVICE PROCEDURE

    The engine build date can be read on the left hand cam cover information sticker.

    To remove spark plugs without damage, it is necessary to adhere exactly to this procedure before removal is attempted.

    CAUTION: DO NOT REMOVE PLUGS WHEN THE ENGINE IS WARM OR HOT. THE ENGINE MUST BE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE WHEN PERFORMING SPARK PLUG SERVICE. REMOVING THE SPARK PLUGS FROM A WARM/HOT ENGINE INCREASES THE CHANCE THE THREADS COULD BE DAMAGED.



    Spark Plug Removal Procedure

    Remove the coil-on-plug assemblies and thoroughly blow out the spark plug wells and surrounding valve cover area with compressed air.
    Back out the spark plugs no more than 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn. Using Motorcraft® Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner, fill the spark plug well just above where the jamb nut hex sits (1/2 - 3/4 teaspoon). A minimum period of 15 minutes of soak time is required. The cleaner will wick down to the ground electrode shield and soften the carbon deposits in this time. DO NOT WORK the spark plug back and forth at this point.
    NOTE: COMPLETELY REVIEW THE PRODUCT LABEL FOR THE MOTORCRAFT CARBURETOR TUNE-UP CLEANER PRODUCT - USE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND SHAKE WELL.



    CAUTION: EXCESSIVE MOTORCRAFT® CARBURETOR TUNE-UP CLEANER, OR REPEATING THE PROCESS SEVERAL TIMES WITH TOO MUCH CLEANER FLUID, COULD INTRODUCE ENOUGH LIQUID VOLUME TO HYDRO-LOCK THE ENGINE.



    CAUTION: DO NOT USE AIR OR POWER TOOLS FOR SPARK PLUG REMOVAL. SPARK PLUGS MUST ONLY BE REMOVED WITH HAND TOOLS.



    Slowly turn the spark plug out. Some screeching and high effort may be noticed, but not in every case. The expected removal torque is about 33 lb-ft (45 N-m), but should decrease on the way out. If it is higher, try turning the spark plug back in a half turn, then back out again. If the turning torque still seems high, repeat the back and forth rotation along with introducing additional Motorcraft® Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner to reduce turning effort.
    Separated/Broken Spark Plug Removal

    If the spark plug does come apart even after following the Spark Plug Removal Procedure, it will break in one of two modes:

    Mode 1: The ground electrode shield is left behind as an empty shell. (Figure 1)


    Figure 1 - Article 08-1-9


    Mode 2: The porcelain center and ground electrode shield is left behind and only the upper jamb nut comes out, or the porcelain breaks with a section remaining in the ground electrode shield and only the upper jamb nut and a section of porcelain comes out. In this case additional soaking with Motorcraft® Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner is required to dissolve carbon deposits. Long-reach nose pliers should be used to grasp and remove the porcelain center from the ground electrode shield. (Figure 2)


    Figure 2 - Article 08-1-9


    Once there is only an empty ground electrode shield left in the cylinder head, perform the following steps to remove the shield using Rotunda Special Service Tool 303-1203. (Figure 3)


    Figure 3 - Article 08-1-9



    NOTE: THIS TOOL IS ONLY DESIGNED TO WORK WITH AN EMPTY GROUND ELECTRODE SHIELD. IF THE SPARK PLUG CAME APART AS DESCRIBED IN MODE 2, THE PORCELAIN CENTER MUST BE REMOVED PRIOR TO FOLLOWING THESE STEPS. IF ATTEMPTS TO REMOVE THE PORCELAIN CENTER ARE UNSUCCESSFUL, CONTACT THE TECHNICAL SERVICE HOTLINE FOR ADDITIONAL REPAIR DIRECTION.

    The combustion chamber must be protected from contamination during the extraction process by using a modified protective cap as a stopper-type plug. This is because the remaining ground electrode shield will be thread-tapped, so the cap is needed to prevent thread chips from falling into the cylinder bore. Cut a vacuum cap to a 3/8 inch (10 mm) length for each ground electrode shield that needs to be removed.
    Install the modified cap with a long drill bit or suitable wire, sized for the internal diameter of the cap. The rubber cap should bottom-out on the electrode strap of the ground electrode shield once installed. (Figure 4)


    Figure 4 - Article 08-1-9


    Thread-tap the ground electrode shield using a 9.0 x 1.0 mm plug tap (tap profile is about 3-4 reduced diameter threads on the tip end).
    Coat the end of the tap with general purpose grease. (Figure 5)


    Figure 5 - Article 08-1-9


    Turn the tap about 3 to 4 turns into the ground electrode shield once the tap begins to cut. As the shield is tapped, for every 1/2 turn, the tap should be backed up 1/8 turn to break chips and prevent any cut material from coiling-up and laying in the spark plug well. All of the thread chips will embed in the grease pack or drop inside the vacuum cap when following this procedure. A suitably sized tap wrench of about 7-9 inches in handle length will aid in reaching down the well. If not available, use an 8 point socket with a ratchet and drive extension. Keep the shank aligned with the axis of the spark plug bore cavity to prevent possible thread bore damage. Use care not to damage any spark plug threads on the way in.
    CAUTION: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE THE GROUND ELECTRODE SHIELD WITH THE TAP AND WRENCH. THE TAP MAY BREAK IF THIS IS ATTEMPTED.



    Carefully back out the tap while maintaining the residual grease coat on the tap which contains some chips. Take care not to touch the sides of the spark plug well bore during removal.
    Once the ground electrode shield is tapped, thread Rotunda Special Service Tool 303-1203 into the ground electrode shield to extract it from the spark plug well and encapsulate any remaining chips from falling into the combustion chamber.
    NOTE: SEE FIGURE 6 FOR DETAILS OF THE TOOL AS INSTALLED IN THE HEAD.





    Figure 6 - Article 08-1-9



    Install the stepped end of the tool pilot bushing into the spark plug well ensuring it bottoms out.
    Screw the center shank into the ground electrode shield. Do not over tighten the shank, to prevent thread stripping.
    Install the nylon washer and jack nut until finger tight.
    Turn the jack nut with a socket and 3/8 inch drive ratchet until the ground electrode is freed from the cavity and withdraw the tool assembly. Several turns of the nut are required. Upon removal, any remaining chips not caught earlier by the tap grease will be captured by the rubber plug sitting at the bottom of the ground electrode shield.
    NOTE: ONCE THE SPARK PLUGS HAVE ALL BEEN REMOVED, NEW PLUGS SHOULD BE INSTALLED USING A FILM COATING OF MOTORCRAFT® HIGH TEMPERATURE NICKEL ANTI-SEIZE LUBRICANT ON THE GROUND ELECTRODE SHIELD OF THE NEW SPARK PLUGS. (FIGURE 7) DO NOT COAT THE ELECTRODE STRAP OR THE PLUG WILL MISFIRE. THE NEW SPARK PLUGS SHOULD BE INSTALLED WITH NO LUBRICANT ON THE THREADS AND TORQUED TO SPECIFICATION, 25 LB-FT (34 N-m).





    Figure 7 - Article 08-1-9




    PART NUMBER PART NAME
    PM-3 Motorcraft® Carburetor Tune-Up Cleaner
    XL-2 Motorcraft® High Temperature Nickel Anti-Seize Lubricant
    382444-S Protective Cap


    WARRANTY STATUS:
    Eligible Under Provisions Of New Vehicle Limited Warranty Coverage And Emissions Warranty Coverage
    IMPORTANT: Warranty coverage limits/policies are not altered by a TSB. Warranty coverage limits are determined by the identified causal part.

    OPERATION DESCRIPTION TIME
    MT080109 Claim Labor As Actual Time Actual Time

    DEALER CODING
    BASIC PART NO. CONDITION CODE
    12405 01
     
    #7
  8. ARTTII

    ARTTII New Member

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    You want the opposite. The car should be COLD. As in park it and let it sit overnight before attempting this procedure. This info is posted in the TSB above and does make a difference. Trying to remove the plugs from a warm engine is asking for trouble.
     
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  9. NastyStang113

    NastyStang113 New Member

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    Agreed. However at one time Ford did put out a TSB calling for a warm motor so it confuses some people. :notnice:
     
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  10. Sparty92

    Sparty92 Member

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    I just rolled 20K on my 2007. I have told the dealer that I will be coming in to get new plugs done.

    If you use the new one-piece plugs from Champion (or whoever), would you still coat the plug with anti-seize?

    Some people representing Ford don't seem to know WTF is going on. I talked to an "expert" at FRPP during the Woodward Dream Cruise. He told me the only people having this problem are those that do "quick trips" and don't allow the engine to get fully warmed up. I told him about the anti-seize solution and he said he would never put that on as it would "melt off." I told him the melting temp was higher than the engine temp and he said, "It gets pretty hot inside the combustion chamber." :nonono:

    This whole thing is really a ****er, isn't it?
     
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  11. 01White5spd

    01White5spd Founding Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I just ordered the motorcraft nickel antiseize.
    Do you think I need to change the plugs or can I just take the old ones out, add anti-seize and reuse them?
     
    #11
  12. skyhazzard

    skyhazzard Member

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    Glad I mentioned it, I wasn't the only one that was clueless. Does for do this for you for free, or is it the usual job security? If I have to do this myself, what are the recommended best plugs for this car? Light mods, SCT, Demolet CAI, Headers o/r X pipe and flowmasters.
     
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  13. Five Oh Brian

    Five Oh Brian New Member

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    I summoned up the courage to install brand new FRPP 3V0 spark plugs by myself this morning in my 07 GT. After all the concerns about them breaking, I read the TSB very cafefully before starting. Car had been sitting more than 24 hours, so it was good and cold. 7 of the 8 came out very easily. The 8th one was very tough to remove, but did not break, thankfully!!! That 8th plug was fouled-looking and was the culprit to my slight/occasional misfire I'd been experiencing since the supercharger install. Installed the new, cooler copper 3V0's, fired right up and went for a spin. No more misfire! I should've installed new/colder plugs, as recommended, at the time of the supercharger install. Oh well; you live, you learn. Anyway, it's all good now! Glad I didn't have to pay a shop to change the plugs. And especially glad none of them broke on the way out!
     
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  14. 01White5spd

    01White5spd Founding Member

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    I'm ****ed. I was planning on doing the plugs this weekend. I ordered the Motorcraft anti-seize and its expired. Says use by 4/01/07 on top of the bottle. Didn't even realize it could expire. I'm waiting on the new one to come in. I should have just tried at the dealer instead of ordering.:nonono:
     
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  15. The Shape

    The Shape Founding Member

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    I have had a few mustangs over the years and am seriously considering getting a new one, but reading threads like this kinda discourages me from buying one. I would think any modern engine should be able to achieve 100K on the original plugs. All of the post about changing at 15K and all has me reconsidering the stang. I want a very low maintaince vehicle that I can spend time driving not wrenching on.
     
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  16. Five Oh Brian

    Five Oh Brian New Member

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    Ford has corrected the spark plug problem. Sounds like any Mustang GT made in Jan 08 or later has the new design.
     
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  17. NastyStang113

    NastyStang113 New Member

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    I believe ANY 2008, regardless of when it was built, has the updated heads. So this would lead me to believe that there are some 2007s with the new heads as well.
     
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  18. GOLDENPONY

    GOLDENPONY Founding Member

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    Plugs

    Meanwhile, us poor schmucks that bought '05-'07 GT's are waiting around for a new plug design (one piece) from Autolite or Motorcraft. I bought the new Champion one piece plugs, and am very happy with the resulting performance, but if Motorcraft or Autolite came out with a new one piece plug, I'd probably go with them. I just know I'll never have the old two piece plugs in my engine again. :notnice:
     
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  19. NastyStang113

    NastyStang113 New Member

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    Don't worry it's not just the Mustang guys ... There are quite a few vehicles that share the 3V heads.
     
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  20. 88GTtom

    88GTtom Member

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    they don't need to be changed at 15,000. ford said they should last to 100,000, but the problem is they seize to the cylinder head. to avoid that problem, people pull them out and anti-seize them. while they are out some prefer to put new ones in. Another problem is ford wont warrantee the plugs. they say they are good for 100,000 miles which put you out of warrantee, and if you have them changed by them before that millage, its comes out of your pocket. even if they break and you are still in warrantee, ford wont cover the labor because they say they are good till 100,000. do some searches here and on other forums, people have had ford do the plugs while they are still covered under warrantee, ford broke the plug off in the head and wouldn't warrantee the labor or parts. B.S. if you ask me, maybe that's why they changed the plugs for 08's and up
     
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