stroking an engine

Discussion in 'SN95 4.6L Mustang Tech' started by DJT03GT, Dec 7, 2003.


  1. DJT03GT

    DJT03GT New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just curious, when you stroke an engine, you increase the stroke. So are the pistons and rods the same length and size? Boring an engine would change those correct? thanks...
    #1
  2. bdcardinal

    bdcardinal tree hugger

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    3,744
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    69
    when you stroke a motor, you use a crankshaft with a longer throw and depending on the combination different rods and pistons. the goal is to increase the distance the piston travels therefore giving a larger displacement. usually the rods and pistons are shorter. the only stroker motor i ever built was a 393W, used 351W block, custom crank, 351 rods and 302 pistons. when boring the block you make the cylinder wider. all you need to replace when boring the block is the pistons.
    #2
  3. VTEngine

    VTEngine Founding Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2002
    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A well thought out stroker assembly should have a crank, rods and pistons all designed to work together in a well arranged fashion to ensure no oil consumption issues and overall longevity. Try to avoid strokers that use oil support rails. If you require a support rail in the oil control ring (due to wrist pin interference), chances are you may experience oiling issues. Not all do, but the chances are much greater.
    #3

Share This Page