1967 coupe hood scoop

chuck gibson

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Aug 2, 2019
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I am in search of a hood scoop for my 1967 coupe. It has a 289 with 351 heads on an edlebrock high rise intake. The hood won't clear the motor... I want something as small as possible That would still allow the turn signals in the hood to be visable. I have seen several that are open in the front but I have a question about that setup. When it is raining does the water blow in to the air filter? There has to be a way around that but I just don't know what it is.
Thank you much for any help you can give me.
 
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KRUISR

5 Year Member
Apr 16, 2015
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For something subtle, why not take an aftermarket turn signal hood (I am assuming you do not want to cut up your current hood) cut along the sides where the factory bump is to raise the center section and add an inch of material. Basically make a low cowl hood with the turn signals still incorporated in it. With a small rise it would not stand out as changed but could give you the clearance you are looking for.

Or do you need 2-3" clearance?
 
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chuck gibson

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Aug 2, 2019
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Thank you. This is a start of possible options. I can't produce a picture at this time because the car is completely stripped. Forty years ago I started building it and that is when I went to shut the hood it was a no go. I cut a hole in the hood and welded a 1" tall ring in the hood for the Moroso chrome breather to stick through. It looked absolutly awesome but I was unable to drive it in the rain because the air filter was exposed. Before I could come up with a solution to the problem a brand new El Camino lost control and totalled it out sitting in a driveway. I kept it and am now in the process of rebuilding it. I'm sure I will have many questions to hit you guys with. I am just trying to come up with solutions in advance...
Thanks again!
 

wicked93gs

10 Year Member
Sep 30, 2006
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I doubt very much that any water that blows in through the filter is a significant enough amount to do anything more than slightly cool the intake air....some perspective on water locking:

I rebuilt an engine for a friend once that had a waterlocked engine...it was turbocharged with water injection....well, the check valve on the water injection system failed, it sucked the water in the resevoir(about a quart) into cylinder #4 and well, water does not compress like air....the connection rod was something like an S shape and the piston took a chunk the size of a quarter out of the bottom of the cylinder wall....but it took an entire quart of water ALL AT ONCE to do that...not to mention a direct path into the engine with engine vacuum pulling it through a hose. Combustion on its own produces water as a by-product of burning hydrocarbons....rain blowing in the front of an air scoop isn't going to water lock your engine....now, if you happen to have an 18 wheeler pass in front of you at a stop sign and kick up an entire puddle onto your hood and into your hood scoop...that may be something else entirely, but water is STILL denser than air...your engine is going to breathe the lightest fluid available to it unless it has no other choice...and that is air...that is why these work:

AEM-21-570P_grande.jpg


these "bypass" filters are built for cars with intakes that would otherwise be at danger of being water locked in the rain....if the main filter becomes submerged in water, they breath through the bypass filter instead. So how does this apply to you? simple...if you are worried about it...run a filter-lid setup, increasing the surface area your filter can breathe through....it will always chose air over water, its very unlikely you will ever surround a filter on top of your engine with enough water to kill the engine.
 

chuck gibson

New Member
Aug 2, 2019
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I doubt very much that any water that blows in through the filter is a significant enough amount to do anything more than slightly cool the intake air....some perspective on water locking:

I rebuilt an engine for a friend once that had a waterlocked engine...it was turbocharged with water injection....well, the check valve on the water injection system failed, it sucked the water in the resevoir(about a quart) into cylinder #4 and well, water does not compress like air....the connection rod was something like an S shape and the piston took a chunk the size of a quarter out of the bottom of the cylinder wall....but it took an entire quart of water ALL AT ONCE to do that...not to mention a direct path into the engine with engine vacuum pulling it through a hose. Combustion on its own produces water as a by-product of burning hydrocarbons....rain blowing in the front of an air scoop isn't going to water lock your engine....now, if you happen to have an 18 wheeler pass in front of you at a stop sign and kick up an entire puddle onto your hood and into your hood scoop...that may be something else entirely, but water is STILL denser than air...your engine is going to breathe the lightest fluid available to it unless it has no other choice...and that is air...that is why these work:

AEM-21-570P_grande.jpg


these "bypass" filters are built for cars with intakes that would otherwise be at danger of being water locked in the rain....if the main filter becomes submerged in water, they breath through the bypass filter instead. So how does this apply to you? simple...if you are worried about it...run a filter-lid setup, increasing the surface area your filter can breathe through....it will always chose air over water, its very unlikely you will ever surround a filter on top of your engine with enough water to kill the engine.
My concern has really never been water locking the engine. It is just knowing that a dry air filter draws in air much better than a filter soaked in water. Before the car was wrecked, the air filter projected about two inches out of the top of the hood. It really looked great and received a lot of compliments. When I had to drive it in the rain I would simply take the top off of the air filter and place a piece of plastic around the front half of the air filter and hold it in place by putting the top back on the air filter to hold it down. I'm just looking for a way to get around that without putting something on the car that would standout like a sore thumb...lol. I like your story. It's amazing what a quart of water can do to an engine!