1996 Cobra - New Shocks/Struts - What else while i'm at it?

ogvenom

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Jan 25, 2022
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I am planning to order either Koni orange shocks/struts or Bilstein B6 for my 96 cobra, both are the quad shock package with all 6. The previous owner says he put Eibach springs back in 2001 but he doesn't know which model, they are black springs, so my best guess is the pro-kit springs. The car is basically slammed, especially since the shocks are worn. I am also going to order camber plates while im at it.

I have 2 questions...

1. Does anyone have their car setup with either of these spring/shock combinations and/or which shock kit would you recommend? This is a semi-daily driver with no track time.

2. What other components would you recommend replacing on suspension while i'm at it?
 

Warhorse Racing

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Feb 10, 2019
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If the car is really low and you install stiffer shocks and struts, you are going to make the car handle worse. Most aftermarket shocks and struts are stiffer than stock. Going too low and too stiff is not ideal for these cars. They handle better when they sit higher than most people think looks cool.

You might have Eibach Sportline springs; they lower the car more than the Pro-Kit springs (which generally don't make the car look slammed). Can you see any part numbers on the springs?

I always recommend adjustable shocks and struts, even for a street car. They allow you to control the ride quality and adjust understeer/oversteer. They make a huge difference in how the car feels (and they allow you to compensate for future suspension mods). Koni Yellow single adjustable shocks and struts are a good option.

While you are working on the suspension, it's a good idea to inspect/replace every rubber bushing. Your bushings are 25 years old; they are most likely worn out. Remember, rubber bushings can look good, but be bad. Make sure to include the steering rack bushings. Depending on how you plan to use the car, you can go with rubber or poly.
 
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ogvenom

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Jan 25, 2022
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If the car is really low and you install stiffer shocks and struts, you are going to make the car handle worse. Most aftermarket shocks and struts are stiffer than stock. Going too low and too stiff is not ideal for these cars. They handle better when they sit higher than most people think looks cool.

You might have Eibach Sportline springs; they lower the car more than the Pro-Kit springs (which generally don't make the car look slammed). Can you see any part numbers on the springs?

I always recommend adjustable shocks and struts, even for a street car. They allow you to control the ride quality and adjust understeer/oversteer. They make a huge difference in how the car feels (and they allow you to compensate for future suspension mods). Koni Yellow single adjustable shocks and struts are a good option.

While you are working on the suspension, it's a good idea to inspect/replace every rubber bushing. Your bushings are 25 years old; they are most likely worn out. Remember, rubber bushings can look good, but be bad. Make sure to include the steering rack bushings. Depending on how you plan to use the car, you can go with rubber or poly.
That makes sense and I definitely don't want the cars handling to suffer, this is supposed to be an improvement. The lower look does look cool but I don't need to be that low, maybe I should just replace the springs with something a little higher while i'm at it.

I thought sportline springs were all red colored and black were the pro-kits, mine are black. They're on the car now and I havent been able to find a part number yet.

Adjustables were my first thought but Bilstein B6 seem to have so many people raving about them on this year/model. I'm going to take a closer look at those Koni Yellow adjustables.

As far as bushings, that was my thought, replace as much as I can. I was going to go with rubber since I understand that poly creates a little more noise and vibration, and i'm only street driving, what do you think?

Thank you for your response, it was very helpful!
 

Warhorse Racing

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It's possible that Eibach changed the color of the springs over the years. In my experience, it's easy to tell the difference in ride height between the Pro-Kit springs and the Sportline springs. How high are your fender lips? Can you see if the spring isolators are in the car?

If you decide to change the springs, progressive springs will work for your application. I generally don't recommend lowering these cars more than an inch. Poly spring isolators will raise the car a little bit more, if necessary.

For your application, rubber bushings will be fine. Poly bushings do add some NVH. And, in some locations, the most common poly bushings aren't ideal. For example, you don't want to use 2-piece poly bushings in the rear UCA/LCA locations. Try to find a complete rubber bushing kit, buying them individually can get expensive.

I'm always happy to help.
 
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ogvenom

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I have about 1.5 to 2 inch gap in front and back. I can see black spring isolators that look like rubber.

Progressive springs are what I was actually leaning toward, I think I read about Ford B springs being a good choice iirc.

I'll order a whole rubber bushing kit so I can just take care of them all at once.

Here are a few pics to show the height its currently at.

IMG_7764.JPG
 

Warhorse Racing

Active Member
Feb 10, 2019
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My SN95 cars sit at around 27" (measured at the center of the fender arch). Before buying new springs, take that measurement on your car. Based on the photos, I suspect you are lower than 27".

The B-springs are a good option. I would recommend using poly spring isolators with them.
 
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