66 mustang electric fuel pump placement

66mustanger63

New Member
Jan 12, 2020
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Where would be the safest and best position to install a electric fuel pump on my 66. Previous owner had mounted a low cost one just forward of fuel tank with rubber lines. Didn't like the set up. (if a leak occured it would spray right to the exhaust. Wanted to mount up in the engine compartment. I have a 85 f250 that the electric pump is in the engine bay works fine. I would prefer engine bay
Any suggestions??
 
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wicked93gs

10 Year Member
Sep 30, 2006
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Nashville TN
There is more than one way to skin a cat. I assume you are concerned because it has rubber lines that could deteriorate and then spray fuel onto the mufflers causing a fire? I would leave the pump where it is, go down to autozone or wherever and buy a roll of new steel fuel/brake line in 3/8" I would replace the barbed hose fitting in the fuel pump with an adapter that adapts a flared 3/8" to whatever sized NPT thread is in the pump, use a 3/8" tube nut on the brake/fuel line, thread it directly into the fuel pump and run the rest of the line up front, using a tubing bender to route it as needed...voila! the line will never deteriorate, and wont be susceptible to leaks with flared fittings. If you are worried about rust...you can use either stainless or copper tubing for this task....all in, a new fuel line made in this method, including the brake line-to NPT adapter fitting should run about $50, maybe $80 if you opt for the more expensive stainless steel. Just to go overkill, I would also fab a heat shield around the pump out of sheet metal that mounts with the same bolts that the fuel pump uses


You would need an adapter of this type to use a 3/8" tube nut(threads into a 3/8" female inverted flare) adapting to a 3/8 NPT thread....your fuel pump may use some other NPT thread though....its most likely 1/4" or 3/8"

P.S. I just realized my solution only addresses the output side of the fuel pump...you can do the same thing for the input side and just have a small rubber hose connecting the sender output and the 3/8" line at the tank(you will still have a small amount of rubber in the system that way, but there is rubber in the factory setup no matter how you look at it...you could actually remove rubber from the equation entirely if you wanted to bother installing tube nuts on the sender itself and flaring the sender tubing and installing the correct adapters...it would be safe to do since the fuel tank is hard-mounted to the chassis and you dont actually need the flex rubber lines provide.

There is also always the solution of going back to a mechanical fuel pump...electrical pumps don't really provide much value for carbed applications unless you are making a lot of power.
 
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66mustanger63

New Member
Jan 12, 2020
4
0
1
56
Ct
There is more than one way to skin a cat. I assume you are concerned because it has rubber lines that could deteriorate and then spray fuel onto the mufflers causing a fire? I would leave the pump where it is, go down to autozone or wherever and buy a roll of new steel fuel/brake line in 3/8" I would replace the barbed hose fitting in the fuel pump with an adapter that adapts a flared 3/8" to whatever sized NPT thread is in the pump, use a 3/8" tube nut on the brake/fuel line, thread it directly into the fuel pump and run the rest of the line up front, using a tubing bender to route it as needed...voila! the line will never deteriorate, and wont be susceptible to leaks with flared fittings. If you are worried about rust...you can use either stainless or copper tubing for this task....all in, a new fuel line made in this method, including the brake line-to NPT adapter fitting should run about $50, maybe $80 if you opt for the more expensive stainless steel. Just to go overkill, I would also fab a heat shield around the pump out of sheet metal that mounts with the same bolts that the fuel pump uses


You would need an adapter of this type to use a 3/8" tube nut(threads into a 3/8" female inverted flare) adapting to a 3/8 NPT thread....your fuel pump may use some other NPT thread though....its most likely 1/4" or 3/8"

P.S. I just realized my solution only addresses the output side of the fuel pump...you can do the same thing for the input side and just have a small rubber hose connecting the sender output and the 3/8" line at the tank(you will still have a small amount of rubber in the system that way, but there is rubber in the factory setup no matter how you look at it...you could actually remove rubber from the equation entirely if you wanted to bother installing tube nuts on the sender itself and flaring the sender tubing and installing the correct adapters...it would be safe to do since the fuel tank is hard-mounted to the chassis and you dont actually need the flex rubber lines provide.

There is also always the solution of going back to a mechanical fuel pump...electrical pumps don't really provide much value for carbed applications unless you are making a lot of power.
Thanks a lot. I did come across a pic of a set up like you mention. And I am interested in no rubber at all option. The guy before me routed rubber to the carb where it comes thru the fender up front. Already changed that. Guy was a bit of a hack. Thanks for the suggestion.
 

wicked93gs

10 Year Member
Sep 30, 2006
623
20
28
Nashville TN
Thanks a lot. I did come across a pic of a set up like you mention. And I am interested in no rubber at all option. The guy before me routed rubber to the carb where it comes thru the fender up front. Already changed that. Guy was a bit of a hack. Thanks for the suggestion.
Just keep in mind, you will need a flex line of some type to go from the hard line to the carb...it doesn't have to be rubber, but neoprene or maybe stainless steel flex lines using AN fittings are options.