Engine '93 running rough, especially at low rpm's and idle.

evintho

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Nov 12, 2003
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Santa Rosa, CA.
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Start car in the morning. Fires up, runs at higher idle for 30 seconds then drops down to 850 rpm or so. Idles fine for exactly 3 minutes then dies. Fire it back up and it idles low and rough. CEL comes on then goes off periodically. Let it warm up then take it for a ride. Runs like crap until the temp gauge reaches the halfway point then it runs pretty good, until I get to a stoplight. At that point, it idles low and runs rough. If I slip it into neutral the idle smooths out until I put it in Drive again. Sometimes it runs fine, other times like crap! Seems to run smooth at speed on the freeway. I've replaced the IAC, MAF, fuel pump, fuel pump relay, cleaned and tightened both 10 pin connectors and also replaced the ECU with a remanned unit.
Pulled codes:
CM:
66 - MAF below minimum voltage
87 - Fuel pump primary circuit fault
96 - Fuel pump secondary circuit fault

and today for the first time I got a new code
KOEO:
82 - Air diverter solenoid circuit fault

I was very careful installing the new MAF so as not to damage the heating element.
Seems to me if both the primary and secondary fuel pump circuits had a fault, the F/P wouldn't work at all!
I carefully inspected all the TAD vac lines and they seemed good.
I followed this procedure when cleaning the 10-pin connectors:
Fuel Injection Technical Library » 10-pin Connector Fix

I cleaned the 60 pin connector when reinstalling the ECU and ground all the paint away from steel when reinstalling the ECU ground screw.
Can a clogged TAD tube at the back of the engine contribute to the running problem and code 82 or would it be a failed solenoid?
Looking at the wiring diagram for codes 87 & 96 the wiring also runs through the inertia switch. Could that be an issue? All that's left besides that would be the wiring and various connectors.
I have no idea why it's still throwing a 66 code unless it's the wiring too. I know the harness is 25 years old but really??
I even took it into a shop I've been frequenting for 20 years and David, a very knowledgeable tech, threw up his hands and couldn't figure it out.
I'm kinda between a rock and a hard place right now. I plan to restore this Mustang but I need to get it running right before I tear into it! Ideas/thoughts/opinions........please!
 
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jrichker

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Start car in the morning. Fires up, runs at higher idle for 30 seconds then drops down to 850 rpm or so. Idles fine for exactly 3 minutes then dies. Fire it back up and it idles low and rough. CEL comes on then goes off periodically. Let it warm up then take it for a ride. Runs like crap until the temp gauge reaches the halfway point then it runs pretty good, until I get to a stoplight. At that point, it idles low and runs rough. If I slip it into neutral the idle smooths out until I put it in Drive again. Sometimes it runs fine, other times like crap! Seems to run smooth at speed on the freeway. I've replaced the IAC, MAF, fuel pump, fuel pump relay, cleaned and tightened both 10 pin connectors and also replaced the ECU with a remanned unit.
Pulled codes:
CM:
66 - MAF below minimum voltage
87 - Fuel pump primary circuit fault
96 - Fuel pump secondary circuit fault

and today for the first time I got a new code
KOEO:
82 - Air diverter solenoid circuit fault

I was very careful installing the new MAF so as not to damage the heating element.
Seems to me if both the primary and secondary fuel pump circuits had a fault, the F/P wouldn't work at all!
I carefully inspected all the TAD vac lines and they seemed good.
I followed this procedure when cleaning the 10-pin connectors:
Fuel Injection Technical Library » 10-pin Connector Fix

I cleaned the 60 pin connector when reinstalling the ECU and ground all the paint away from steel when reinstalling the ECU ground screw.
Can a clogged TAD tube at the back of the engine contribute to the running problem and code 82 or would it be a failed solenoid?
Looking at the wiring diagram for codes 87 & 96 the wiring also runs through the inertia switch. Could that be an issue? All that's left besides that would be the wiring and various connectors.
I have no idea why it's still throwing a 66 code unless it's the wiring too. I know the harness is 25 years old but really??
I even took it into a shop I've been frequenting for 20 years and David, a very knowledgeable tech, threw up his hands and couldn't figure it out.
I'm kinda between a rock and a hard place right now. I plan to restore this Mustang but I need to get it running right before I tear into it! Ideas/thoughts/opinions........please!

How to clear codes.
Clearing the codes by pressing a button on the scan tool or disconnecting the test jumper used to start the code dump does not erase the “learned settings”. All it does is erase the stored codes in memory.

You must clear the codes anytime you replace any sensor. The following tells you how and is different from the method above
Clear the computer codes by disconnecting the battery negative terminal and turn the headlights on. Turn the headlights off and reconnect the all sensors including the MAF and anything else you may have disconnected. Then reconnect the battery negative cable.. This clears all spurious codes may have been generated while troubleshooting problems. It also clears the adaptive settings that the computer "learns" as it operates. Clearing the codes does not fix the code problems, it just gives you a clean slate to start recording what the computer sees happening.

Run the car for at least 30 minutes of driving and dump the codes again to assure that you have fixed the code problem or sensor problem. This is necessary for the computer to relearn the adaptive settings that the computer uses for proper operation. The engine may run rough at first, but should smooth out as it runs for the 15-20 minute learning period.



Code 66 or 157 MAF below minimum test voltage.

Revised 15 mar 2018 to clarify how to do resistance checks on the MAF wiring

Insufficient or no voltage from MAF. Dirty MAF element, bad MAF, bad MAF wiring, missing power to MAF. Check for missing +12 volts on this circuit. Check the two links for a wiring diagram to help you find the red wire for computer power relay switched +12 volts. Check for 12 volts between the red and black wires on the MAF heater (usually pins A & B). while the connector is plugged into the MAF. This may require the use of a couple of safety pins to probe the MAF connector from the back side of it.

Computer wiring harness connector, wire side.
71316.gif


Computer wiring harness connector, computer side.
88243.gif




Diagrams courtesy of Tmoss and Stang&2Birds

ECC Diagram for 88-90 5.0 Mustangs
88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif


ECC Diagram for 91-93 5.0 Mustangs
91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif


94-95 Diagram for 94-95 5.0 Mustangs[/b]
94-95_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif



How the MAF works

There are three parts in a MAF: the heater, the sensor element and the amplifier. The heater heats the MAF sensor element causing the resistance to increase. The amplifier buffers the MAF output signal and has a resistor that is laser trimmed to provide an output range compatible with the computer's load tables. Changes in RPM causes the airflow to increase or decrease, changing the voltage output. The increase of air across the MAF sensor element causes it to cool, allowing more voltage to pass and telling the computer to increase the fuel flow. A decrease in airflow causes the MAF sensor element to get warmer, decreasing the voltage and reducing the fuel flow.

The MAF element is secured by 2 screws & has 1 wiring connector. To clean the element, remove it from the MAF housing and spray it down with electronic parts cleaner or non-inflammable brake parts cleaner (same stuff in a bigger can and cheaper too).

89-90 Model cars: Measure the MAF output at pins C & D on the MAF connector (dark blue/orange and tan/light blue) or at pins 50 & 9 on the computer. Be sure to measure the sensor output by measuring across the pins and not between the pins and ground.

91-95 Model cars: Measure the MAF output at pins C & D on the MAF connector light blue/red and tan/light blue) or at pins 50 & 9 on the computer. Be sure to measure the sensor output by measuring across the pins and not between the pins and ground.


At idle = approximately .6 volt
20 MPH = approximately 1.10 volt
40 MPH = approximately 1.70 volt
60 MPH = approximately 2.10 volt

Actually, MAF pins C & D float with reference to ground. The signal output of the MAF is a differential amplifier setup. Pins C & D both carry the output signal, but one pin's output is inverted from the other. The difference in signal between C & D is what the computer's input circuit is looking for. The difference in the two outputs helps cancel out electrical noise generated by the ignition system and other components. Since the noise will be of the same polarity, wave shape and magnitude, the differential input of the computer electronically subtracts it from the signal. Then it passes the signal on to an Analog to Digital converter section inside the computer's CPU chip.


Check the resistance of the MAF signal wiring
For the next 2 checks make your measurement with the MAF disconnected from the wiring harness.

Pin D on the MAF wiring harness and pin 50 on the computer (dark blue/orange wire) should be less than 2 ohms. Pin C on the MAF wiring harness and pin 9 on the computer (tan/light blue wire) should be less than 2 ohms.

There should be a minimum of 10K ohms between either pin C or D on the MAF wiring connector and pins A or B.

Reconnect the MAF to the wiring harness and proceed to the next section.

Code 87 – fuel pump primary circuit failure. The fuel pump lost power while the engine was running. Check fuel pump relay, check inertia switch, wiring to/from inertia switch, red wire going to inertia switch for +12volts. Check the other side of inertia switch for +12 volts.

Diagram of the fuel pump wiring for 86-90 cars



Diagram of the fuel pump wiring for 91-93 cars.



Code 96 causes & tests 91-93 models. – KOEO- Fuel pump monitor circuit shows no power - Fuel pump relay or battery power feed was open - Power / Fuel Pump Circuits. The fuel pump circuit lost power at one time or another.

Revised 24-Mar-2017 to add text about the A/C Wide Open Throttle relay and using the wire colors to identify which relay is the fuel pump relay

Clear the codes by disconnecting the battery and turning on the headlights for about 5 minutes before reconnecting the battery. This will clear any remaining codes. Drive the car for several days and dump the codes again. In many cases, this clears the 96 code.

Look for a failing fuel pump relay, bad connections or broken wiring. On 91 model cars, the fuel pump relay is under the driver’s seat. The fuel pump relay is located under the Mass Air Meter on Fox bodied stangs built after 91. It can be confused with the A/C Wide Open Throttle relay which is in the same area. Use the wire colors as shown in the diagram below to identify which relay is the fuel pump relay.

Diagram of the fuel pump wiring for 91-93 cars.


Look for power at the fuel pump - the fuel pump has a connector at the rear of the car with a pink/black wire and a black wire that goes to the fuel pump. The pink/black wire should be hot when the test connector is jumpered to the test position. To trick the fuel pump into running, find the ECC test connector and jump the connector in the lower RH corner to ground. No voltage when jumpered, check the fuel pump relay and fuse links.




Power feed: Look for 12 volts at the pink/black wire (power source for fuel pump relay). No voltage or low voltage, bad fuse link, bad wiring, or connections. Remember that on 92 or later models the fuel pump relay is located under the Mass Air meter. Watch out for the WOT A/C control relay on these cars, as it is located in the same place and can easily be mistaken for the fuel pump relay.

Relay: Turn on the key and jumper the ECC test connector as previously described. Look for 12 volts at the dark green\yellow wire (relay controlled power for the fuel pump). No voltage there means that the relay has failed, or there is a broken wire in the relay control circuit. Be sure to closely check the condition of the relay, wiring & socket for corrosion and damage.



91-93 Models:
Using the diagram, check the dark green/yellow wire from the fuel pump relay: you should see 12 volts or so. If not the relay has failed or is intermittent. Check the inertia switch: on a hatch it is on the driver’s side by the taillight. Look for a black rubber plug that pops out: if you don't find it, then loosen up the plastic trim. Check for voltage on both sides of the switch. If there is voltage on both sides, then check the Pink/black wire on the fuel pump relay: it is the power feed to the fuel pump. Good voltage there, then the fuel pump is the likely culprit since it is getting power. No voltage there, check the Pink/black wire, it is the power feed to the fuel pump relay & has a fuse link in it. Good voltage there & at the dark green/yellow wire, swap the relay.

All testing is done with the ignition switch in the Run position. Do not forget this crucial step.

The pink/black wire should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the fuel pump has opened up.

With the test jumper in place the green/yellow wire should be the same voltage as the pink/black wire +/- 0.25 volt.

If not, look at the red wire: should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt.
If not, then check the yellow wire on the EEC relay located on top of the computer. This one is hard to get to. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the computer has opened up.

If the red wire does not have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt and the yellow wire on the EEC relay does, then check the red/green wire on the EEC relay. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the ignition switch is defective or the fuse link in the ignition wiring harness has opened up, or the EEC relay is defective.

All testing is done with the ignition switch in the Run position. Do not forget this crucial step.

The pink/black wire s should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the fuel pump has opened up.

With the test jumper in place the green/yellow wire should be the same voltage as the pink/black wire +/- 0.25 volt.

If not, look at the red wire: should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt.
If not, then check the yellow wire on the EEC relay located on top of the computer. This one is hard to get to. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the fuse link for the computer has opened up.

If the red wire does not have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt and the yellow wire on the EEC relay does, then check the red/green wire on the EEC relay. It should have the same voltage as the battery positive terminal +/- 0.25 volt. If not, then the ignition switch is defective or the fuse link in the ignition wiring harness has opened up, or the EEC relay is defective.

Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds
IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif



Code 82 – Secondary Air Injection Diverter Solenoid failure AM1. Possible bad wiring, bad connections, missing or defective solenoid valve. Check the solenoid valve for +12 volts at the Red wire and look for the Red/White wire to switch from +12 volts to 1 volt or less. The computer controls the valve by providing a ground path on the Red/White wire for the solenoid valve

With the engine running, stick a safety pin in the Red/White wire for the solenoid valve & ground it. That should turn the solenoid on and cause air to flow out the port that goes to the pipe connected to the heads. If it doesn't, the valve is bad. If it does cause the airflow to switch, the computer or wiring going to the computer is not signaling the solenoid valve to open.

Both 81 & 82 codes usually mean that some uneducated person removed the solenoid control valves for the Thermactor Air system in an attempt to make the car faster. It doesn't work that way: no working control valves can cause the cat converters to choke and clog. If you do not have cat converters on the car, you can ignore the 81 & 82 codes.



See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/

Ignition switch wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif

Fuel pump, alternator, ignition & A/C wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif

Computer, actuator & sensor wiring
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

Fuse panel layout
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/MustangFuseBox.gif

Vacuum routing
http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxFordVacuumDiagram.jpg
 
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