Cold Starts

Nightstang00

Active Member
Mar 20, 2017
133
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so.. I have been going through the surging idle check list. Previously I had idle issues when the engine was warm. That was corrected by a idle adjustment plate for the iac. Now I’m have terrible cold starts , to the point of stalling immediately and now stuttering once it stays running. Once it warms up, idle is good, but still stuttering. I ran codes and got these.
81
82
85
84
10
33c
96c
94r
44r
33r

I have no emissions , blocked off egr. I changed the iac / air temp coolant temp cleaned every plug I could find , pulled upper intake man off and all looks good. Cleaned mass air sensor, checked grounds, did the best I could looking for vacuum leaks, checked idle and tps , reset computer. I’m at a loss. Tune up was done earlier this year. Don’t really drive her a lot.
 
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jrichker

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The idle bypass plate is a poor fix for a problem that should never have happened. You are stalling because of one of 2 things: overly advanced timing or overly lean idle mixture.

Setting the timing:

You can forget about anything beyond this point if you don't have access to a timing light. You will never get the timing set right without one.

Note: If you don't have access to a timing light, most of the larger auto parts stores will rent or loan one if you have a credit card or leave a cash deposit.

Paint the mark on the harmonic balancer with paint -choose 10 degrees BTC or 14 degrees BTC or something else if you have NO2 or other power adder. I try to paint TDC red, 10 degrees BTC white and 14 degrees BTC blue.

10 degrees BTC is towards the driver’s side marks.

Note: setting the timing beyond the 10 degree mark will give you a little more low speed acceleration. BUT you will need to run 93 octane to avoid pinging and engine damage. Pinging is very hard to hear at full throttle, so it could be present and you would not hear it.

Simplified diagram of what it looks like. Not all the marks are shown for ease of viewing.

ATC ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '!' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' BTC
---------------- > Direction of Rotation as viewed standing in front of the engine.

The ' is 2 degrees.
The ! is TDC
The ' is 10 degrees BTC
Set the timing 5 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 5 marks towards the driver's side to get 10 degrees.

To get 14 degrees, set it 7 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 7 marks towards the driver's side to get 14 degrees.

The paint marks you make are your friends if you do it correctly. They are much easier to see that the marks machined into the harmonic balancer hub.

Make sure that you set he timing when the engine is up to operating temperature.

At this point hook up all the wires, get out the timing light. Connect timing light up to battery & #1 spark plug.

Remove the SPOUT connector (do a search if you want a picture of the SPOUT connector) It is the 2 pin rectangular plug on the distributor wiring harness. Only the EFI Mustang engines have a SPOUT. If yours is not EFI, check for a SPOUT: if you don’t find one, skip any instructions regarding the SPOUT
Warning: there are only two places the SPOUT should be when you time the engine. The first place is in your pocket while you are setting the timing and the second is back in the harness when you finish. The little bugger is too easy to lose and too hard to find a replacement.

Start engine, loosen distributor hold down with a 1/2" universal socket. Shine the timing light on the marks and turn the distributor until the mark lines up with the edge of the timing pointer. Tighten down the distributor hold down bolt, Replace the SPOUT connector and you are done.

The HO firing order is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.
Non HO firing order is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

attachment.php?attachmentid=51122&d=1183977187.gif



Setting the timing:

You can forget about anything beyond this point if you don't have access to a timing light. You will never get the timing set right without one.

Note: If you don't have access to a timing light, most of the larger auto parts stores will rent or loan one if you have a credit card or leave a cash deposit.

Paint the mark on the harmonic balancer with paint -choose 10 degrees BTC or 14 degrees BTC or something else if you have NO2 or other power adder. I try to paint TDC red, 10 degrees BTC white and 14 degrees BTC blue.

10 degrees BTC is towards the driver’s side marks.

Note: setting the timing beyond the 10 degree mark will give you a little more low speed acceleration. BUT you will need to run 93 octane to avoid pinging and engine damage. Pinging is very hard to hear at full throttle, so it could be present and you would not hear it.

Simplified diagram of what it looks like. Not all the marks are shown for ease of viewing.

ATC ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '!' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' BTC
---------------- > Direction of Rotation as viewed standing in front of the engine.

The ' is 2 degrees.
The ! is TDC
The ' is 10 degrees BTC
Set the timing 5 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 5 marks towards the driver's side to get 10 degrees.

To get 14 degrees, set it 7 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 7 marks towards the driver's side to get 14 degrees.

The paint marks you make are your friends if you do it correctly. They are much easier to see that the marks machined into the harmonic balancer hub.

Make sure that you set he timing when the engine is up to operating temperature.

At this point hook up all the wires, get out the timing light. Connect timing light up to battery & #1 spark plug.

Remove the SPOUT connector (do a search if you want a picture of the SPOUT connector) It is the 2 pin rectangular plug on the distributor wiring harness. Only the EFI Mustang engines have a SPOUT. If yours is not EFI, check for a SPOUT: if you don’t find one, skip any instructions regarding the SPOUT
Warning: there are only two places the SPOUT should be when you time the engine. The first place is in your pocket while you are setting the timing and the second is back in the harness when you finish. The little bugger is too easy to lose and too hard to find a replacement.

Start engine, loosen distributor hold down with a 1/2" universal socket. Shine the timing light on the marks and turn the distributor until the mark lines up with the edge of the timing pointer. Tighten down the distributor hold down bolt, Replace the SPOUT connector and you are done.

The HO firing order is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.
Non HO firing order is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

attachment.php?attachmentid=51122&d=1183977187.gif


IAC doesn't work: look for +12 volts at the IAC red wire. Then check for continuity between the white/lt blue wire and pin 21 on the computer. The IAC connector contacts will sometimes corrode and make the IAC not work. The red wire on the IAC is always hot with the engine in run mode. The computer provides a ground for the current for the IAC. It switches the ground on and off, making a square wave with a varying duty cycle. A normal square wave would be on for 50% of the time and off for 50% of the time. When the idle speed is low, the duty cycle increases more than 50% to open the IAC more. When the engine speed is high, it decreases the duty cycle to less than 50% to close the IAC. An old-fashioned dwell meter can be used to check the change: I haven’t tried it personally, but it should work. In theory, it should read ½ scale of whatever range you set it on with a 50% duty cycle. An Oscilloscope is even better if you can find someone who has one and will help.

attachment.php?attachmentid=58887&stc=1&d=1247241098.gif


Automobile computers use current sink technology. They do not source power to any relay, solenoid or actuator like the IAC, fuel pump relay, or fuel injectors. Instead the computer provides a ground path for the positive battery voltage to get back to the battery negative terminal. That flow of power from positive to negative is what provides the energy to make the IAC, fuel pump relay, or fuel injectors work. No ground provided by the computer, then the actuators and relays don't operate.

We are going to supply an artificial ground path to the IAC instead of letting the computer supply the ground.

Start the engine and let it warm up.

Take one of the cheap inline fuse holders with a 5 amp fuse in it. Use it to bypass the blue/white wire to ground. You'll have to get creative probing the back side of the IAC wiring with safety pins or paper clips. Since the computer doesn't supply any voltage , but supplies a ground, that can't hurt the computer. The 5 amp fuse protects you and the wiring if there is an internal short in the IAC coil.

The engine should speed up when the fuse holder wire is grounded and slow down or stall when the fuse holder wire is disconnected from ground.



Recommended procedure for cleaning the IAC/IAB:
Conventional cleaning methods like throttle body cleaner aren’t very effective. The best method is a soak type cleaner used for carburetors. If you are into fixing motorcycles, jet skis, snowmobiles or anything else with a small carburetor, you probably have used the one gallon soak cleaners like Gunk or Berryman. One of the two should be available at your local auto parts store for $22-$29. Take the solenoid off the body and set it aside: the carb cleaner will damage some types of plastic parts. Soak the metal body in the carb cleaner overnight. There is a basket to set the parts in while they are soaking. When you finish soaking overnight, twist the stem of the IAB/IAC that sticks out while the blocker valve is seated. This removes any leftover deposits from the blocker valve seat. Rinse the part off with water and blow it dry with compressed air. The IAC/IAB should seal up nicely now. Once it has dried, try blowing through the bottom hole and it should block the air flow. If it doesn't block the airflow, there is still something that is gumming up the works. Reassemble and reinstall to check it out. Reassemble and reinstall to check it out.

Gunk Dip type carb & parts soaker:


Setting the base idle speed:
First of all, the idle needs to be adjusted to where the speed is at or below 600 RPM with the IAC disconnected. If you have a wild cam, you may have to raise this figure 100-150 RPM or so. Then the electrical signal through the IAC can vary the airflow through it under computer control. Remember that the IAC can only add air to increase the base idle speed set by the mechanical adjustment. The 600 RPM base idle speed is what you have after the mechanical adjustment. The IAC increases that speed by supplying more air under computer control to raise the RPM’s to 650-725 RPM’s. This figure will increase if you have a wild cam, and may end up between 800-950 RPM

Remember that changing the mechanical idle speed adjustment changes the TPS setting too.

This isn't the method Ford uses, but it does work. Do not attempt to set the idle speed until you have fixed all the codes and are sure that there are no vacuum leaks.

Disconnect the battery negative terminal and turn the headlights on. Leave the battery negative terminal disconnected for 5 minutes or so. Then turn the headlights off and reconnect the battery. This erases the computer settings that may affect idle performance.

Warm the engine up to operating temperature, place the transmission in neutral, and set the parking brake. Turn off lights, A/C, all unnecessary electrical loads. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector. Remove the SPOUT plug. This will lock the ignition timing so that the computer won't change the spark advance, which changes the idle speed. Note the engine RPM: use the mechanical adjustment screw under the throttle body to raise or lower the RPM until you get the 600 RPM mark +/- 25 RPM. A wild cam may make it necessary to increase the 600 RPM figure to 700 RPM or possibly a little more to get a stable idle speed.
Changing the mechanical adjustment changes the TPS, so you will need to set it. Anything between.6 and 1.0 volt is good. There is no advantage to setting it to .99; that is a BOZO Internet myth, complete with red nose and big floppy shoes.

When you are satisfied with the results, turn off the engine, and re-install the SPOUT and reconnect the IAC. The engine should idle with the range of 650-750 RPM without the A/C on or extra electrical loads. A wild cam may make this figure somewhat higher.
 

Nightstang00

Active Member
Mar 20, 2017
133
12
28
35
The idle bypass plate is a poor fix for a problem that should never have happened. You are stalling because of one of 2 things: overly advanced timing or overly lean idle mixture.

Setting the timing:

You can forget about anything beyond this point if you don't have access to a timing light. You will never get the timing set right without one.

Note: If you don't have access to a timing light, most of the larger auto parts stores will rent or loan one if you have a credit card or leave a cash deposit.

Paint the mark on the harmonic balancer with paint -choose 10 degrees BTC or 14 degrees BTC or something else if you have NO2 or other power adder. I try to paint TDC red, 10 degrees BTC white and 14 degrees BTC blue.

10 degrees BTC is towards the driver’s side marks.

Note: setting the timing beyond the 10 degree mark will give you a little more low speed acceleration. BUT you will need to run 93 octane to avoid pinging and engine damage. Pinging is very hard to hear at full throttle, so it could be present and you would not hear it.

Simplified diagram of what it looks like. Not all the marks are shown for ease of viewing.

ATC ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '!' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' BTC
---------------- > Direction of Rotation as viewed standing in front of the engine.

The ' is 2 degrees.
The ! is TDC
The ' is 10 degrees BTC
Set the timing 5 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 5 marks towards the driver's side to get 10 degrees.

To get 14 degrees, set it 7 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 7 marks towards the driver's side to get 14 degrees.

The paint marks you make are your friends if you do it correctly. They are much easier to see that the marks machined into the harmonic balancer hub.

Make sure that you set he timing when the engine is up to operating temperature.

At this point hook up all the wires, get out the timing light. Connect timing light up to battery & #1 spark plug.

Remove the SPOUT connector (do a search if you want a picture of the SPOUT connector) It is the 2 pin rectangular plug on the distributor wiring harness. Only the EFI Mustang engines have a SPOUT. If yours is not EFI, check for a SPOUT: if you don’t find one, skip any instructions regarding the SPOUT
Warning: there are only two places the SPOUT should be when you time the engine. The first place is in your pocket while you are setting the timing and the second is back in the harness when you finish. The little bugger is too easy to lose and too hard to find a replacement.

Start engine, loosen distributor hold down with a 1/2" universal socket. Shine the timing light on the marks and turn the distributor until the mark lines up with the edge of the timing pointer. Tighten down the distributor hold down bolt, Replace the SPOUT connector and you are done.

The HO firing order is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.
Non HO firing order is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

attachment.php?attachmentid=51122&d=1183977187.gif



Setting the timing:

You can forget about anything beyond this point if you don't have access to a timing light. You will never get the timing set right without one.

Note: If you don't have access to a timing light, most of the larger auto parts stores will rent or loan one if you have a credit card or leave a cash deposit.

Paint the mark on the harmonic balancer with paint -choose 10 degrees BTC or 14 degrees BTC or something else if you have NO2 or other power adder. I try to paint TDC red, 10 degrees BTC white and 14 degrees BTC blue.

10 degrees BTC is towards the driver’s side marks.

Note: setting the timing beyond the 10 degree mark will give you a little more low speed acceleration. BUT you will need to run 93 octane to avoid pinging and engine damage. Pinging is very hard to hear at full throttle, so it could be present and you would not hear it.

Simplified diagram of what it looks like. Not all the marks are shown for ease of viewing.

ATC ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '!' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' BTC
---------------- > Direction of Rotation as viewed standing in front of the engine.

The ' is 2 degrees.
The ! is TDC
The ' is 10 degrees BTC
Set the timing 5 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 5 marks towards the driver's side to get 10 degrees.

To get 14 degrees, set it 7 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 7 marks towards the driver's side to get 14 degrees.

The paint marks you make are your friends if you do it correctly. They are much easier to see that the marks machined into the harmonic balancer hub.

Make sure that you set he timing when the engine is up to operating temperature.

At this point hook up all the wires, get out the timing light. Connect timing light up to battery & #1 spark plug.

Remove the SPOUT connector (do a search if you want a picture of the SPOUT connector) It is the 2 pin rectangular plug on the distributor wiring harness. Only the EFI Mustang engines have a SPOUT. If yours is not EFI, check for a SPOUT: if you don’t find one, skip any instructions regarding the SPOUT
Warning: there are only two places the SPOUT should be when you time the engine. The first place is in your pocket while you are setting the timing and the second is back in the harness when you finish. The little bugger is too easy to lose and too hard to find a replacement.

Start engine, loosen distributor hold down with a 1/2" universal socket. Shine the timing light on the marks and turn the distributor until the mark lines up with the edge of the timing pointer. Tighten down the distributor hold down bolt, Replace the SPOUT connector and you are done.

The HO firing order is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.
Non HO firing order is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

attachment.php?attachmentid=51122&d=1183977187.gif


IAC doesn't work: look for +12 volts at the IAC red wire. Then check for continuity between the white/lt blue wire and pin 21 on the computer. The IAC connector contacts will sometimes corrode and make the IAC not work. The red wire on the IAC is always hot with the engine in run mode. The computer provides a ground for the current for the IAC. It switches the ground on and off, making a square wave with a varying duty cycle. A normal square wave would be on for 50% of the time and off for 50% of the time. When the idle speed is low, the duty cycle increases more than 50% to open the IAC more. When the engine speed is high, it decreases the duty cycle to less than 50% to close the IAC. An old-fashioned dwell meter can be used to check the change: I haven’t tried it personally, but it should work. In theory, it should read ½ scale of whatever range you set it on with a 50% duty cycle. An Oscilloscope is even better if you can find someone who has one and will help.

attachment.php?attachmentid=58887&stc=1&d=1247241098.gif


Automobile computers use current sink technology. They do not source power to any relay, solenoid or actuator like the IAC, fuel pump relay, or fuel injectors. Instead the computer provides a ground path for the positive battery voltage to get back to the battery negative terminal. That flow of power from positive to negative is what provides the energy to make the IAC, fuel pump relay, or fuel injectors work. No ground provided by the computer, then the actuators and relays don't operate.

We are going to supply an artificial ground path to the IAC instead of letting the computer supply the ground.

Start the engine and let it warm up.

Take one of the cheap inline fuse holders with a 5 amp fuse in it. Use it to bypass the blue/white wire to ground. You'll have to get creative probing the back side of the IAC wiring with safety pins or paper clips. Since the computer doesn't supply any voltage , but supplies a ground, that can't hurt the computer. The 5 amp fuse protects you and the wiring if there is an internal short in the IAC coil.

The engine should speed up when the fuse holder wire is grounded and slow down or stall when the fuse holder wire is disconnected from ground.



Recommended procedure for cleaning the IAC/IAB:
Conventional cleaning methods like throttle body cleaner aren’t very effective. The best method is a soak type cleaner used for carburetors. If you are into fixing motorcycles, jet skis, snowmobiles or anything else with a small carburetor, you probably have used the one gallon soak cleaners like Gunk or Berryman. One of the two should be available at your local auto parts store for $22-$29. Take the solenoid off the body and set it aside: the carb cleaner will damage some types of plastic parts. Soak the metal body in the carb cleaner overnight. There is a basket to set the parts in while they are soaking. When you finish soaking overnight, twist the stem of the IAB/IAC that sticks out while the blocker valve is seated. This removes any leftover deposits from the blocker valve seat. Rinse the part off with water and blow it dry with compressed air. The IAC/IAB should seal up nicely now. Once it has dried, try blowing through the bottom hole and it should block the air flow. If it doesn't block the airflow, there is still something that is gumming up the works. Reassemble and reinstall to check it out. Reassemble and reinstall to check it out.

Gunk Dip type carb & parts soaker:
21hb0QWbOeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg


Setting the base idle speed:
First of all, the idle needs to be adjusted to where the speed is at or below 600 RPM with the IAC disconnected. If you have a wild cam, you may have to raise this figure 100-150 RPM or so. Then the electrical signal through the IAC can vary the airflow through it under computer control. Remember that the IAC can only add air to increase the base idle speed set by the mechanical adjustment. The 600 RPM base idle speed is what you have after the mechanical adjustment. The IAC increases that speed by supplying more air under computer control to raise the RPM’s to 650-725 RPM’s. This figure will increase if you have a wild cam, and may end up between 800-950 RPM

Remember that changing the mechanical idle speed adjustment changes the TPS setting too.

This isn't the method Ford uses, but it does work. Do not attempt to set the idle speed until you have fixed all the codes and are sure that there are no vacuum leaks.

Disconnect the battery negative terminal and turn the headlights on. Leave the battery negative terminal disconnected for 5 minutes or so. Then turn the headlights off and reconnect the battery. This erases the computer settings that may affect idle performance.

Warm the engine up to operating temperature, place the transmission in neutral, and set the parking brake. Turn off lights, A/C, all unnecessary electrical loads. Disconnect the IAC electrical connector. Remove the SPOUT plug. This will lock the ignition timing so that the computer won't change the spark advance, which changes the idle speed. Note the engine RPM: use the mechanical adjustment screw under the throttle body to raise or lower the RPM until you get the 600 RPM mark +/- 25 RPM. A wild cam may make it necessary to increase the 600 RPM figure to 700 RPM or possibly a little more to get a stable idle speed.
Changing the mechanical adjustment changes the TPS, so you will need to set it. Anything between.6 and 1.0 volt is good. There is no advantage to setting it to .99; that is a BOZO Internet myth, complete with red nose and big floppy shoes.

When you are satisfied with the results, turn off the engine, and re-install the SPOUT and reconnect the IAC. The engine should idle with the range of 650-750 RPM without the A/C on or extra electrical loads. A wild cam may make this figure somewhat higher.
I really appreciate your response. I got some work to do tomorrow. I see your name a lot of places on here. That’s really cool that your always helping people. Thank you.
 
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Mustang5L5

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Mod Dude
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Is this a mass air swap car? Code 96 really only shows on a running car of the additional fuel pump wire to the ECU hasn't been run during the swap. If it is a swap, have the VSS wires been run as well? They sometimes are needed to help with idle strategy.

Most of those codes pertain to the smog stuff on the motor. It's clear the charcoal canister, egr and air tube stuff have been removed, but the codes themselves shouldn't affect how the car runs.

Code 44/94 id look into. Could be failing o2 sensors but also could be vac leaks or simply due to the smog tube to the heads being removed. In that case there's nothing to you can do.

Honestly, unless you reinstall smog equipment, you won't get rid of any of those codes.

What exactly is the car doing? How was your EGR blocked off? Is it possibkebthe block off leaks into the intake which would cause issues on cold start.
 

Nightstang00

Active Member
Mar 20, 2017
133
12
28
35
Is this a mass air swap car? Code 96 really only shows on a running car of the additional fuel pump wire to the ECU hasn't been run during the swap. If it is a swap, have the VSS wires been run as well? They sometimes are needed to help with idle strategy.

Most of those codes pertain to the smog stuff on the motor. It's clear the charcoal canister, egr and air tube stuff have been removed, but the codes themselves shouldn't affect how the car runs.

Code 44/94 id look into. Could be failing o2 sensors but also could be vac leaks or simply due to the smog tube to the heads being removed. In that case there's nothing to you can do.

Honestly, unless you reinstall smog equipment, you won't get rid of any of those codes.

What exactly is the car doing? How was your EGR blocked off? Is it possibkebthe block off leaks into the intake which would cause issues on cold start.
I had the egr on it and I removed it. It did the same thing. I took off the upper intake and check all the tubes for vacuum. They all look good. I don’t really mind codes if this idled and started ok. The symptoms are:

Cold start , 3-5 times before the car stays running. Turns off after it starts immediately, revs up to 1500-2k rpm then falls and stalls. If I try to rev it during this time I feel like I get no response or a stutter. Then I’m assuming the engine is warmer, it starts up then just surges from 500-1500 rpm sometime stalls. Then when the engine hits 120+ degrees it idles fine 800 rpm. The problem now is driving it, it’s a 5 speed. If I’m driving through a neighborhood low rpms it’s stuttering. Maybe slow acceleration, but on a street with traffic it’s fine. From driving to a stop light I press in the clutch and the rpms drop instantly to 7-800rpm. Doesn’t feel right. Doesn’t gradually fall. Just drops as soon as I press the clutch in.
 

Nightstang00

Active Member
Mar 20, 2017
133
12
28
35
Is this a mass air swap car? Code 96 really only shows on a running car of the additional fuel pump wire to the ECU hasn't been run during the swap. If it is a swap, have the VSS wires been run as well? They sometimes are needed to help with idle strategy.

Most of those codes pertain to the smog stuff on the motor. It's clear the charcoal canister, egr and air tube stuff have been removed, but the codes themselves shouldn't affect how the car runs.

Code 44/94 id look into. Could be failing o2 sensors but also could be vac leaks or simply due to the smog tube to the heads being removed. In that case there's nothing to you can do.

Honestly, unless you reinstall smog equipment, you won't get rid of any of those codes.

What exactly is the car doing? How was your EGR blocked off? Is it possibkebthe block off leaks into the intake which would cause issues on cold start.
It’s a 93 Gt I bought the car and it was mass air. I don’t think it’s a swap
 
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