Suspension Front Control Arm Angle Help

408stroker5.0

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Mar 10, 2004
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Anyone experience this? The angle on the control arm seems excessive to me...I put an angle gauge on it and it's sitting at 8.2 degrees. Is this something I should be concerned about? I have the bump steer kit just mocked up but I wont be able to go any lower (plus I understand the tie-rod should be paralel to the control arm). Ride height is set at just under 26" (fender to floor). Setup details are.... 1987 Mustang GT... Street/Strip Car. TeamZ K-Member, Team Z/Strange Coil Overs, 1" Shorter TeamZ Control Arms, Flaming River Manual Rack w/Offset bushings, SN95 Spindles (Off a 94), TeamZ Adj. Caster/Camber Plates, Maximum Motorsports Bumpsteer Kit.
 

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nickyb

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I do know bone stock is near even ( leavel), when you lower ,it changes and you gotta put bumpster kit.I don't know what would be unacceptable.Call Dave at team Z, he'll get you right.
 

Mustang5L5

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Don't go by aligning the tie rod to the control arm to set bumpsteer. Tie rod should be close to parallel with the inner LCA pivot points, and the pivot point of the balljont. Bumpsteer should really be measured though, as it doesn't take much in the spacer stack to throw it way off. In fact, it can even differ side-to-side based on how centered the steering rack is and if one tie rod inner protrudes out further than the other. The distance of the inner tie rod pivot to the spindle will affect spacer stack.

With the control arm up at that angle, the bumpsteer effects become exaggerated and you'd going to have some big camber changes over bumps. It's easier to keep bumpsteer in check when the control arm is closer to parallel with the ground. I'm not familiar with the Team Z k-member, but the MM k-member relocates the inner pivot points up 1/2" and 1" to allow the arm to be closer to parallel to the ground on a lowered car. However, that K-member is more for road-racing, and the TeamZ is more for drag racing, so I would contact team-Z and get their opinion
 
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KRUISR

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Don't go by aligning the tie rod to the control arm to set bumpsteer. Tie rod should be close to parallel with the inner LCA pivot points, and the pivot point of the balljont.
I was always under the impression that zero bump steer occurred when tie rod length (inner pivot to outer pivot) and control arm length (ball joint pivot to arm bushing pivot) was the same and parallel. That way they go through the same arc and toe does not change through suspension cycle.

The Team Z k-member must really lower the control arm mount points as my suspension is about the same height at fender arch but control arm is almost parallel to ground.

Passenger front wheel.jpg 20201103_140610.jpg
 

Mustang5L5

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I was always under the impression that zero bump steer occurred when tie rod length (inner pivot to outer pivot) and control arm length (ball joint pivot to arm bushing pivot) was the same and parallel. That way they go through the same arc and toe does not change through suspension cycle.

There's always goin to be bumpsteer, it's just a matter of getting the least amount. Bumpsteer has "sweet spots" so to speak. The best place to optimize bumpsteer is where the control arm pivot points are near parallel to the ground. The factory right height was optimized to provide the lease amount of camber and toe change .This translates to litte effect on bumpsteer since the components are moving through roughtly the same arc radius.

This is why the MM K-member has two control arm mounting locations and both are higher than stock. They figure people buying them will be lowering the car, so the relocated inner points make it easier to keep the control arm parallel to the ground on lowered car, which translates to less camber camber change, and less toe/bumpsteer change.

As the Mustang control arm moves up, that radius difference begins to become more pronounced. You can kinda see what i mean in this graphic

1611504461962.png


As the mustang suspension goes up, the tie rod will actually pull the wheel in. But, close to ride height, the arcs are roughly the same. This is why bumpsteer should be measured and optimized at ride height, because these small differences do make a difference
 
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2000xp8

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Am i the only one that would rather pull a transmission than figure out bumpsteer? Out of all the the projects and parts i have to install and work on, messing with the bumpsteer is what i want to do the least.
 

Mustang5L5

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Am i the only one that would rather pull a transmission than figure out bumpsteer? Out of all the the projects and parts i have to install and work on, messing with the bumpsteer is what i want to do the least.

I dunno. I literally just benchpresses my T5 into place just now. I’m getting too old for rolling around under a car
 

2000xp8

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I dunno. I literally just benchpresses my T5 into place just now. I’m getting too old for rolling around under a car
In all fairness, i have a car lift, lol.

It's just one of those things i don't want to do.
And i'm one of those guys that if i don't want to do it, i probably shouldn't...