Fuel Problems! Possible Overheating? Need help/reccomendations!

Stangit50

New Member
Aug 11, 2009
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I've noticed over the last couple weeks my fuel pump is louder than normal. It's always been loud when first priming, but lately when slowing down or at idle I can hear that fuel pump like surging up and down.

Today I had plenty of premium gas in it and the car lost all power and shut off. I primed it a couple times and the pump sounded like it was straining itself. It would start and barely idle, I could drive maybe 15ft not able to get over 1k rpms before it would die again. The engine has mods although not sure of all the mods it has.

After letting the car cool down for 20mins, I started the car and it ran fine although the pump was whining quite bad! I'm thinking I need to replace the pump asap and get an adjustable fuel regulator and gauge while I'm at it.

What pump/regulator would you guys recommend? I'm thinking a Walbro 225lph but what regulator is good and not real expensive?

I drove the car for about 2hrs, raced a C5 Corvette on the highway and took him pretty good. I have my autometer sport comp electric water temp and oil pressure gauges now and there was a lot of stop and go traffic. The water temps got almost to 250* and that scares me! I already have a 3G alternator upgrade. Was thinking of buying the bolt on Mark VIII fan that Fox Body Mustang Parts LLC has put together along with a new aluminum radiator and 180* thermostat. Possibly replace the stock water pump with a high volume one? I live in FL and we are hitting over 100* during the day.​
 
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jrichker

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Use a Kirban fuel pressure regualtor & a 155 LPH pump for a N/A engine.
Here's why..

Copied from the FORD RACING PERFORMANCE PARTS catalog

PROPERLY SIZING FUEL SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Fuel Pumps

The following information is presented assuming the above information has been taken into consideration regarding BSFC, fuel pressure and specific gravity of the fuel being used. Most fuel pumps for electronic fuel injection are rated for flow at 12 volts @ 40 PSI. Most vehicle charging systems operate anywhere from 13.2v to 14.4v. The more voltage you feed a pump, the faster it spins which, obviously, will put out more fuel. Rating a fuel pump at 12 volts then, should offer a fairly conservative fuel flow rating allowing you to safely determine the pump’s ability to supply an adequate amount of fuel for a particular application.

As previously mentioned, engines actually require a certain WEIGHT of fuel, NOT a certain VOLUME of fuel per horsepower. This can offer a bit of confusion since most fuel pumps are rated by volume, and not by weight. To determine the proper fuel pump required, a few mathematical conversions will need to be performed using the following information. There are 3.785 liters in 1 US Gallon. 1 gallon of gasoline (.72 specific gravity @ 65° F) weighs 6.009 LBS.

To be certain that the fuel pump is not run to its very limit, which could potentially be dangerous to the engine, multiply the final output of the fuel pump by 0.9 to determine the capacity of the fuel pump at 90% output. This should offer plenty of ‘cushion’ as to the overall “horsepower capacity” of the fuel pump.

To determine the overall capacity of a fuel pump rated in liters, use the additional following conversions:
(Liters per Hour) / 3.785 = Gallons
Multiply by 6.009 = LBS/HR
Multiply by 0.9 = Capacity at 90%
Divide by BSFC = Horsepower Capacity
So for a 110 LPH fuel pump:
110 / 3.785 = 29.06 Gallons
29.06 x 6.009 = 174.62 LBS/HR
174.62 x 0.9 = 157 LBS/HR @ 90% Capacity
157 / 0.5 = 314 HP safe naturally aspirated “Horsepower Capacity”

Safe “Horsepower Capacity” @ 40 PSI with 12 Volts
60 Liter Pump = 95 LB/HR X .9 = 86 LB/HR, Safe for 170 naturally aspirated Horsepower
88 Liter Pump = 140 LB/HR X .9 = 126 LB/HR, Safe for 250 naturally aspirated Horsepower
110 Liter Pump = 175 LB/HR X .9 = 157 LB/HR, Safe for 315 naturally aspirated Horsepower
155 Liter Pump = 246 LB/HR X .9 = 221 LB/HR, Safe for 440 naturally aspirated Horsepower
190 Liter Pump = 302 LB/HR X .9 = 271 LB/HR, Safe for 540 naturally aspirated Horsepower
255 Liter Pump = 405 LB/HR X .9 = 364 LB/HR, Safe for 700 naturally aspirated Horsepower

Note: For forced induction engines, the above power levels will be reduced because as the pressure required by the pump increases, the flow decreases. In order to do proper fuel pump sizing, a fuel pump map is required, which shows flow rate versus delivery pressure.

That is, a 255 liter per hour pump at 40 PSI may only supply 200 liters per hour at 58 PSI (40 PSI plus 18 lbs of boost). Additionally, if you use a fuel line that is not large enough, this can result in decreased fuel volume due to the pressure drop across the fuel feed line: 255 LPH at the pump may only result in 225 LPH at the fuel rail.


Now that you have decided what size pump, here's some installation tips:

Here are some useful tips...

I have done the tank removal three times, and the main issues are getting the car up on jack stands and getting the gas out of the tank. DO NOT try to do this job without jack stands. Becoming a pancake is not part of the repair process.

Some 5 gallon paint pails lined with garbage bags are good to hold the gas. The garbage bags provide a clean liner for the pails and keep the loose trash out of the gas so you can reuse it. A piece of 1/2" garden hose stuck down the filler neck will siphon all but a gallon or so of the gas.

Remove the filler neck bolts and put them in a zip bag. Disconnect the supply & return lines by removing the plastic clips from the metal tubing. If you damage the clips, you can get new ones form the auto part store for just a few dollars. I have used tie-wraps, but that is not the best choice. Then you remove the two 9/16" nuts that hold the T bolts to the straps. Put the nuts in the zip bag with the filler bolts. Pull the plastic shield down and away from the tank. Once the tank drops a little bit you can disconnect the wiring for the pump & fuel quantity sender.

The pump assembly comes out by removing a large metal ring that unscrews from the tank. You are supposed to use a brass punch to tap on the ring so that you don't make sparks. Look closely at the rubber O ring gasket when you remove the sender. The pump assembly requires some twisting and turning to get it out the hole.

Look very closely at the electrical wiring. The stock fuel pump wiring can overheat and melt the insulation. Mine had some really crummy plastic tubing slid over the quick disconnects. If the wires ever got together, there would be sparks inside the fuel tank and no more Mustang. I eliminated the splice in the middle of the wiring and went straight from the pump to the feed through connectors for the wiring. It required some soldering and crimping of new tabs on the wires, but it made a neater job.

Inspect the pump mount to metal tubing bracket. Mine broke and I couldn't get it to solder back together. I drilled a small hole for a machine screw & self locking nut to hold the clamp and bracket together.

The pump is easy to get off the mount but is somewhat difficult to get back it the tank without damaging the sock filter or tearing it on the tank baffle. When you install the metal ring that holds the pump in place, watch out for the gasket O ring. Some RTV may be helpful if the ring is not in excellent condition.

The tank to filler pipe seal is a large rubber grommet. Inspect it for hardening, tears and damage. At $20 from the Ford dealer, it might be a good idea to replace it.

I used a floor jack to help lift the tank back in place. You may find that it is the only time you really can make good use of a helper.
 

Stangit50

New Member
Aug 11, 2009
13
0
2
Will using a Walbro 225 with the regulator hurt? I plan on supercharging the motor so I'd rather have the fuel pump to support that and not have to drop the tank again and upgrade later on.​