Leveling car

Rent-A-Racer

New Member
Jan 5, 2004
187
0
0
What is the best way to level the car with jackstands? i.e. placement of stands, etc.

ALso where is the ideal place in the car to read the level, and get and acurate reading??
 
  • Sponsors(?)


Ronstang

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
1,294
0
0
56
Houston Texas
I never got the link yesterday since my computer was off all day and this is the first time I have seen it.

I made (modified normal ones actually) adjustable jackscrew jackstands specifically for this purpose. the easiest way is to buy the cheap tubular ones, drill a 3/4" hole in the center of the head and use industrial threaded rod and nuts to fashion the adjusters. Weld on nut to the top and then use another to snug the rod. I used some 3" square 1/8" plates I had laying around and welded nuts to them for the part to rest the car on.

The best place to level the car is measuring at the front and rear of the rocker assemblies as the chance of them being out of square is minimal. If there is any question take it to a frame shop and have it squared first....this is what I did. You will have to fashion some type of trammel bar that you can attach to the undersine lip of the rockers to hold the level or you could cheat and just use the level on a beam across the rocker on the top at the front and back of the door opening. I used the frame rails as measuring points for level but my car is solid, rust free, and just came home from the frame shop and I know it is dead on. You are replacing the frame rails so I suggest you use the rockers to set level and then get the frame rails level and paralllel to them.

I hope this helps. You can IM me if I can help you in any way.....they are in my profile.
 

Rent-A-Racer

New Member
Jan 5, 2004
187
0
0
So, I should level by measuring from said points to the ground, not by placing the level directly on the car?
 

Ronstang

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
1,294
0
0
56
Houston Texas
No, you definitely put the level on the car because there is no guarrantee that the floor is level or consistant....that is why I made adjustable jackstands.
 

Rent-A-Racer

New Member
Jan 5, 2004
187
0
0
Gotcha! That's what I intended to do! Thanks alot!.
One other question;
When I remove the factory spot welds,(frame to the firewall area) should I relocate the replacement plug welds in a different area? I'm concerned about possible metal fatigue and/or weakness from removing the old frame rail welds? Or would bead welding the perimeter of the frame rail to the firewall be a superior alternative method?
 

Ronstang

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
1,294
0
0
56
Houston Texas
Use a good spot weld cutter (I use the BLue Point Roto-Broach and it is worth every $$) and drill from the floor side and then use those holes to weld it back in. There is no worry of metal fatigue and this gives you the same number of welds as the factory and the best overall appearance. Do not perimeter weld, it is not necessary, it is unattractive, and it is almost impossible to remove the panel in the future in need be.
 

Rent-A-Racer

New Member
Jan 5, 2004
187
0
0
I agree the perimeter weld is less attractive, but was willing to sacrifice factory looking welds for safety. Drilling from the floor side is a great idea. I have someone that will do the welding for me. ( I will be removing and aligning everything.) Is there anything I should be aware of, as far as the type of welder verses the type of metal.(to insure a strong plug weld?)
He is a welder by trade, but I want to be sure all is correct. I always overkill in this area before a project
 

Ronstang

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
1,294
0
0
56
Houston Texas
The best welder for rosette (plug) welding is definitley a MIG. Any size will work as long as it can be turned down low enough for the size sheetmetal you are working with so a professional welder should have the proper equipment.
 

Ronstang

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
1,294
0
0
56
Houston Texas
Anytime, that is what this place is supposed to be for. ou can IM me if you need help while doing the work, I will help if I can and am available.