Longevity Mods?

Aznpersuasion

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Is there a sticky (or even enough mods) for longevity mods for our cars (engine/drivetrain). My 2014 chevy 1500 it was recommended to install an air/oil separator due do it being DI and the intake valves get super dirty by 50k requiring disassembly to clean them. Something like that. Thanks.
 
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84Ttop

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Is there a sticky (or even enough mods) for longevity mods for our cars (engine/drivetrain). My 2014 chevy 1500 it was recommended to install an air/oil separator due do it being DI and the intake valves get super dirty by 50k requiring disassembly to clean them. Something like that. Thanks.
If you have some information that could lend itself to lengthening the life of these cars, I would be glad to make that a Sticky
With that being said, an air/oil separator is never a bad idea. I've seen first hand how much oil the UPR catch cans have pulled from a brand new motor and am down right impressed! I'll be installing a catch can on my S550 over the winter with a few other upgrades that are planned. For the most part, the coyote motors have been proven to hold up to the abuse (exceptions apply ;) )
 

Noobz347

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If you have some information that could lend itself to lengthening the life of these cars, I would be glad to make that a Sticky
With that being said, an air/oil separator is never a bad idea. I've seen first hand how much oil the UPR catch cans have pulled from a brand new motor and am down right impressed! I'll be installing a catch can on my S550 over the winter with a few other upgrades that are planned. For the most part, the coyote motors have been proven to hold up to the abuse (exceptions apply ;) )


I've had this thought several times in reference to catch-cans:

Why not install a one-way check valve in the bottom of the can that allows oil to return to the pan once the motor is shut off?

There would be virtually zero down-side for anyone who changes oil at regular intervals. :shrug:
 

84Ttop

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I've had this thought several times in reference to catch-cans:

Why not install a one-way check valve in the bottom of the can that allows oil to return to the pan once the motor is shut off?

There would be virtually zero down-side for anyone who changes oil at regular intervals. :shrug:
This is a pretty solid idea, implementing it in a plug and play fashion would be the difficult part. The only down side I could possibly see is pulling contamination into the intake system if thst drain check valve failed? Just brainstorming here
 

Noobz347

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This is a pretty solid idea, implementing it in a plug and play fashion would be the difficult part. The only down side I could possibly see is pulling contamination into the intake system if thst drain check valve failed? Just brainstorming here


The method would be simple. Vac would close a one-way check valve at the bottom of the can to keep the can from sucking oil from the oil pan when the motor is running. When the motor stops, gravity open the check valve and the oil slowly drains back into the pan.

The only mod an existing catch can would need is the one-way valve and a drain line going into the oil pan. :shrug:
 

84Ttop

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The method would be simple. Vac would close a one-way check valve at the bottom of the can to keep the can from sucking oil from the oil pan when the motor is running. When the motor stops, gravity open the check valve and the oil slowly drains back into the pan.

The only mod an existing catch can would need is the one-way valve and a drain line going into the oil pan. :shrug:
I'm thinking the difficulty would be the modification to the oil pan, not everyone is keen on the idea of putting a tap in there (I may be one of the few exceptions to that?). To play devils advocate, what happens when/if the check valve fails? To this point, I had to change a passing check valve on my IMRC's just yesterday. This particular check valve was a Ford part (re-purposed from 03/04 cobra) to keep the boost pressure off of the IMRC's. I got a CEL that had me look into this and found a bad check valve to be the issue. I suppose that if the drain was above the oil level even a bad check valve would only add to the vacuum in the crank case? Just thinking out loud here
 

Noobz347

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The oil is contaminated. This guy actually had his tested.

Why having a catch can is best!!! - Lightning Forum | LightningRodder.com


Yes, yes, I understand this argument. Again, we're talking about changing oil at regular intervals (often it's changed even more often than necessary... damned gear heads). Oil is DESIGNED to take on contaminated particulates. Talking about water content in oil that doesn't ever reach operating temp is a bit pointless. Leave oil to collect anywhere that it has access to ambient air, it's going to pick up water. This is also a function of motor oil.

His test results are not a convincing argument for a catch can. Take those same results and dilute them over 5+ quarts of oil. :shrug:
 

84Ttop

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Yes, yes, I understand this argument. Again, we're talking about changing oil at regular intervals (often it's changed even more often than necessary... damned gear heads). Oil is DESIGNED to take on contaminated particulates. Talking about water content in oil that doesn't ever reach operating temp is a bit pointless. Leave oil to collect anywhere that it has access to ambient air, it's going to pick up water. This is also a function of motor oil.

His test results are not a convincing argument for a catch can. Take those same results and dilute them over 5+ quarts of oil. :shrug:
If 2 or 3 ounces of water doesn't come out of my oil pan before the first drip of oil than I know something is wrong.... Oh wait we are talking about the alcohol motor in my 84'....
Any engine temp under 180 degrees will condense water no different than any boiler system, most cars will condense water while they are warming up (except electric ones lol) so I agree that water content in the oil is a moot point save the example of my racing hoagie