Rebuilding need advice as to what kit I should get and what bore

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General karthief

wonder how much it would cost to ship you a pair
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Is this the same car different thread?
 

jozsefsz

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A slimy catch-can may not mean anything. If the oil in the sump looked like that, I'd suggest you'd definitely need a head-gasket (assuming your bearings weren't yet damaged by letting that go on too long) but I wouldn't necessarily think you're looking at a rebuild kit. Again, unless there's metal in the oil pan or you have rod-knock.

If you're in a very cold or humid location, and the car isn't driven frequently or for very long, it's not unusual to catch some of that milkshake-looking stuff. I've also noticed some oil brands (Valvoline Synthetic) will degrade into the slimy stuff that shows up in my catch-can where other brands (Mobil 1) will not.

So to help you with 'what kind of rebuild kit you should get,' I think we'd need a lot more evidence / information. I'm initially thinking 'none' unless you have other symptoms and / or you've had it checked out by a competent trustworthy mechanic who has proof of internal damage or low compression.
 
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Eloke

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A slimy catch-can may not mean anything. If the oil in the sump looked like that, I'd suggest you'd definitely need a head-gasket (assuming your bearings weren't yet damaged by letting that go on too long) but I wouldn't necessarily think you're looking at a rebuild kit. Again, unless there's metal in the oil pan or you have rod-knock.

If you're in a very cold or humid location, and the car isn't driven frequently or for very long, it's not unusual to catch some of that milkshake-looking stuff. I've also noticed some oil brands (Valvoline Synthetic) will degrade into the slimy stuff that shows up in my catch-can where other brands (Mobil 1) will not.

So to help you with 'what kind of rebuild kit you should get,' I think we'd need a lot more evidence / information. I'm initially thinking 'none' unless you have other symptoms and / or you've had it checked out by a competent trustworthy mechanic who has proof of internal damage or low compression.
Alright, yea it has that valvoline synthetic in it, tomorrow I’m gonna clean the catch can hoses and check the can again, also doing a compression check, I’ll pull the pan and check it out, it’s been pretty cold where I’m at also, I appreciate the advice
 
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Eloke

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Alright, yea it has that valvoline synthetic in it, tomorrow I’m gonna clean the catch can hoses and check the can again, also doing a compression check, I’ll pull the pan and check it out, it’s been pretty cold where I’m at also, I appreciate the advice
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Sounds like a solid course of action. I'd put fresh oil in it and see what happens.

Kurt
oh yea definitely, just to be sure 95 gt takes 5 quarts right?
 

revhead347

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Pulling the pan is not exactly an easy operation. I'd just flush it out with a few extra quarts of oil.

Kurt
 
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Eloke

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Is there only one cause for the catch can to be like that? Blown head gasket? Or does it depend on what it looks like when I drain it
 

revhead347

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Is there only one cause for the catch can to be like that? Blown head gasket? Or does it depend on what it looks like when I drain it
Honestly, catch cans get like that from the car sitting too long, or too many short trips, etc. There could be moisture in the catch can, and nothing wrong with the engine. If you change the oil in the engine, and it stays clean, I wouldn't have any reason to assume there is anything wrong with it.

Kurt
 
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Eloke

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Honestly, catch cans get like that from the car sitting too long, or too many short trips, etc. There could be moisture in the catch can, and nothing wrong with the engine. If you change the oil in the engine, and it stays clean, I wouldn't have any reason to assume there is anything wrong with it.

Kurt
Oil changed, was fine wasnt frothy or anything wasn’t milkey, I’m new to catch cans I thought it was screwed, oil kinda smells like gas but no coolant so
 

Chip Schweiss

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Even with a catch can you should have a PCV valve. Without it, oil is more likely to end up in the can. The whole point of the catch can is to catch oil and not burn it so you should get some oil in there, but not large amounts. I'd expect a few ounces between every oil change. Short trips in cool humid environments a really good at making milkshake looking oil deposits in the valve covers, oil caps, breathers and catch cans.

Without good evidence of problems, I wouldn't pull the pan either. Start with a compression test. It's best done warm, but if compression is good even when cold, you're likely in good shape.

Leak down tests are good to determine if compression problems are valves or rings. If you have a leaking cylinder you can squirt some oil in to seal the rings. If it still leaks its valves. If it seals up with an oil squirt it's the rings.

Borescopes are also great for inspection. One with a small camera can see in spark plug holes and enter through the drain plug. You should be able to see consistent hash marks on the cylinder walls and no vertical scars. With some fanangling you can even inspect the valves and seats.

By the time you've gone through all those tests, you'll probably be leaving it or pulling the motor.

If you do end up rebuilding, you'll need to tear it down to assess everything first. If you don't have all the tools for measuring bearings, pistons and ring sizes, a machine shop will. I personally never use a kit and assemble based on what I'm building. The kits always seem to have lots of cheap parts such ask cork oil pan and valve cover gaskets. The cost difference isn't that significant buying kits instead of individuals, especially when buying from sites like Summit. I'd much rather spend an additional $100-200 to get all quality parts and not have problems down the road because I cheaped out.

Hopefully all checks out good. If you need to rebuild again, you really don't want to bore again. 0.060 over is getting on the thin side and some blocks will have problems with added power.

-Chip
 
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7991LXnSHO

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If this was a human, I say you were jumping the diagnosis and treatment and going straight to a funeral with a patient that might not be even sick.

Compression and leak down tests are in order If driving it until good and warm and checking out the crank venting/PVC system do not solve the issue. It is common to see junk like that milkshake under the 710 (oil) fill caps on cars driven around town on short, cold trips.

As far as what rebuild parts and sizes, that’s determined by you and the machine shop with specific measurement tools. When you eventually get there, we can help on brands and specifics for how hard you are pushing it, but not the sizes.