Progress Thread The Tale Of Elsuperpinto (From Back Burner, to Work Bench, to Accidental Progress)

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
Oh man that sucks!! And I know what you mean about some of that too. Seems I'm always the first person called when someone has an issue with their car with an unexpressed expectation that I'll do the work. At least it used to be that way anyway, until I moved like 1000 miles away.... I still get calls, but usually more for advice. It's one of the reasons I'm glad I stopped pursuing that career path when I was young. I didn't want to get burned out doing what I really like doing and I feel that that's exactly what would've happened. "Do what you love" they say - I guess it's true in some respects, but man it can get tiring!!
I give my kids advice to 'do what they're good at, and that will pay the bills' -- save what you love for a hobby. Mike Rowe (the Dirty Jobs guy) has a great speech on the topic. When I was younger I tried my hand at being a professional mechanic. It was exhausting, and mundane, and it was a sweat-shop environment. 15 minutes for a 4-tire change with balancing and including the test drive. Was very different from working on my own car, at my own pace, with a cold one waiting for me when I was ready for a break. No matter what you do for work, you'll eventually get tired of it -- if it didn't suck, they wouldn't pay you to do it. Would have come to hate working on cars with a passion if I'd have stuck with it. Still love the hobby, even though I'm also the family repair man.
My advice for everyone thinking about getting into the business of working on cars is "don't".

After you've done it awhile, you're so jaded about cars that even getting to drive a twin-turbo V8 monster wit massaging seats (Mercedes S550) does nothing for you. You get to the point that you hate working on everything, and wish you'd spent the $50-100k a good tech has spent on tools to go to school and be an engineer so you could've been the college-educated pencil-pushing prick that thought internal waterpumps were a good idea instead of the poor :leghump: that has to fix it.

Throw in the miserable working conditions, the constant exposure to carcinogens, and the stress of flat-rate pay, and well... I hate it. I hate cars.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LILCBRA and 2Blue2
  • Sponsors (?)


RaggedGT

the temporary thread ban is a nice tool - LoL
Mod Dude
Jul 20, 2014
4,281
2,831
183
34
Taylorsville ky
www.stangnet.com
My advice for everyone thinking about getting into the business of working on cars is "don't".

After you've done it awhile, you're so jaded about cars that even getting to drive a twin-turbo V8 monster wit massaging seats (Mercedes S550) does nothing for you. You get to the point that you hate working on everything, and wish you'd spent the $50-100k a good tech has spent on tools to go to school and be an engineer so you could've been the college-educated pencil-pushing prick that thought internal waterpumps were a good idea instead of the poor :leghump: that has to fix it.

Throw in the miserable working conditions, the constant exposure to carcinogens, and the stress of flat-rate pay, and well... I hate it. I hate cars.
I mostly agree with this statement.
I spent 15 years in the automotive repair field . The last 10 years I worked for a company that did general automotive, specializing in heat and AC. Industrial radiator/cooler repair and fuel tank renu. So while I was fortunate that I could have a change of pace at the company-doing AC work today and radiator recore’s the next. It gets old and working on a commission/budget/flat rate wears on ya.
When I made the change from automotive to bus repair- working for the state on city buses, for a very good salary and Benefits package. Is something I wish I would have done years ago.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2Blue2

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
I've burned a vacation day for tomorrow night for the nerdiest of reasons (going to see this https://ds9documentary.com/ ), and nothing can be done to the Taurus until the timing chain tensioner, water pump, cam phaser bolts, valve cover gaskets, and intake gaskets get here, so maybe... just maybe... I'll mess with the Mustang tomorrow. We usually have an extra car running/driving "just in case" around here (though it's been mostly less than necessary for the last several years), and for some reason not being in that position right now bothers me, and the II is the one that can be made running/driving the easiest right now of the three that aren't (Taurus, Capri, Mustang II... all Fords... coincidence? I think not).
 

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
0525191647.jpg


My day off... Taurus day...


:leghump: this car and the bastard engineers that thought putting a water pump THERE was a good idea.
 

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
Oh the horror, the shear unadulterated horror!
This is the third Duratec/Ecoboost/Cyclone family V6 I've had torn down this far. This one would've been SO much easier with the powertrain dropped out of it. Doing it in-car sucks ass.

Got the timing chain back on it and called it a day, I'd been outside working on it for 9 hours at that point.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RaggedGT and 2Blue2

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
That is more stupid than when gm thought putting a starter under the intake was a good Idea.
Hey, putting the starter under the intake is perfectly fine. There is nothing wrong with that whatsoever. (That's where it is on a 4.7L Toyota V8, like the one in my 4Runner.)

In all reality, there's nothing wrong with putting the starter there, IF you're going to use a starter that isn't garbage (Toyota uses Denso, GM uses Remy, guess which one usually lasts a quarter million miles before it gives you a warning noise for a few weeks before it fails, and which one fails around 36k when the warranty is gone?
 

LILCBRA

10 Year Member
Dec 6, 2005
996
204
84
47
Marietta, Ga
In either case, it's an engineer who designed it with constraints from designers. Neither one seem to take into account the people that have to wrench on things. It seems to be a running issue in engineering, whether it's the mechanics who have to repair failures or the toolmakers building the tools to make such nonsense, I think we all cuss them from time to time. I mean it's all good in theory and when everything is new, but then when something goes wrong it seems you gotta take half of the assembly apart just to repair a simple part - but that's not THEIR problem......
 

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
In either case, it's an engineer who designed it with constraints from designers. Neither one seem to take into account the people that have to wrench on things. It seems to be a running issue in engineering, whether it's the mechanics who have to repair failures or the toolmakers building the tools to make such nonsense, I think we all cuss them from time to time. I mean it's all good in theory and when everything is new, but then when something goes wrong it seems you gotta take half of the assembly apart just to repair a simple part - but that's not THEIR problem......
Here's the best part...

The RWD versions of the Duratec don't have an internal water pump!

The only reason I've been this far inside the RWD version is because the extra heat from the turbos on the Ecoboost version cause the timing chain tensioner and or cam phasers to fail. They're the exact same parts as the non-turbo engines, and on the non-turbo engine, said parts have seen 300,000+ miles without failure so long as the water pump on the FWD version doesn't destroy them with coolant.

So a 3.3/3.5/3.7 F150 without turbos might not ever be torn down this far, and neither will a 3.7 Mustang. Just the 3.5 Ecoboost in the trucks and SUVs due to timing chain issues, and all of the FWD/AWD versions with this retarded water pump design.
 

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
0526191509f.jpg
0526191509e.jpg
0526191509c.jpg
0526191509a.jpg
0526191509d.jpg


These pictures just show all of the tools that came home from work just to do this stupid water pump. Luckily I have one of these:
https://www.mactools.com/en-us/Tool-Storage/Tool-Bags/TB506/Wheel-Pro-Bag so it was easy enough to tote it all home. Seriously though, the only tools "from home" for this project are that long 1/2-drive Harbor Freight extension and the chrome Bluepoint socket set. All of the cordless tools, the torque wrenches, the cam-holding tools, long ratchets, cat's claw tools, cooling system air lift, balancer puller, balancer installer, serpentine belt tool, and the stubby Astro Pneumatic sockets made the trip home from work just to get this job done.

The Mustang II saw some use as a table and workbench for the day.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 2Blue2 and RaggedGT

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
0526191510.jpg
0526191924.jpg
0525191833.jpg
0525191647.jpg


These somehow ended up out of order, and I'm on the living room multimedia PC which has a touchpad instead of a mouse or trackball right now, so fixing it would suck.

The last picture is of the new water pump installed on the engine, with a lot of gasket scraping on the block left to do.

The second-to-last picture is illustrating one of the secondary timing chain assemblies being re-assembled.

The first picture is all of all of the chains, tensioners, and guides being re-assembled, and the engine ready for the timing cover.

The second picture is of the engine with the timing cover and VCTs back on. I took two more photos, but when I went to post them via my phone, they were gone, no idea what happened.
 
Last edited:

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
0602191935.jpg


Finally had a chance to fire the bastard up today (got everything done but coolant and oil before dark last weekend). Runs smoother than it has in ages, no leaks, and most importantly, no knocking, even after being run at 2500rpm for 10 minutes to burp the coolant.
 

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
In SuperPinto news... some progress was inadverdently made on that old hunk 'o junk this week.

I have secured a Tremec TR3650 transmission from a 2004 Mach 1 for free... If you can't guess where this is going, hang on. If you can, DON'T SPOIL IT FOR ANYONE DAMMIT!!!



we-now-return-5b7f82.jpg
 
Last edited:

74stang2togo

NERD!
Mod Dude
Mar 7, 2002
6,134
2,086
224
A product I helped develop being discussed on the first car forum I ever joined when i was like 16. Love it
They've been brought up in the Tool Review Thread in the Foxbody section as well. Another member there has the 1/2" drive set.

They almost instantly became my go-to sockets when I got them. They were on Amazon for a "why the hell not?" price, so I ordered them, and they're an absolute godsend for brakes, timing covers, serpentine belts, and so much more. I have Snap-On, Craftsman, and Sunex sets collecting dust because of these.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2Blue2

2Blue2

Active Member
Mar 5, 2019
453
208
53
51
Oahu
The Mustang II saw some use as a table and workbench for the day.
Any loving is good loving... (reminds me of one of my other mustangs 'Ole Shelf' its in the garage just holding stuff up)


I have secured a Tremec TR3650 transmission from a 2004 Mach 1 for free...
Oooh! Freee! :nice: ;):cool:Second best price in the world Baby!... ( well they could pay ya to take it.):rolleyes::cautious:
 

Similar threads