Engine Timing Issues

885.0h

New Member
Jun 27, 2016
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Hello I have an 88 mustang timing is set at 12 btdc was running good now wont start unless distributor is really advanced, pings at 3k rpm and when retarded starts missing at 3k rpm/ sputters

Ive replaced:
Distributor, Plugs & wires
Ignition coil
Put a9l ecu in, when I received the car it had the a9s ecu, Fuel pressure at 39lbs plugged, unplugged 31lbs

Any help would be appreciated thank you
car has been converted to MAF as well

*The setup is gt40p heads edelbrock performer upper/lower stock cam
motor came from an 98 explorer has dished pistons? but no valve reliefs don't know if it would make difference
thanks
 
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Mustang5L5

This is a big reason why I pulled it out
Mod Dude
Feb 18, 2001
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'88s don't have a check engine light, so you'll need the dump the codes with a test light, or an innova 3145 code reader.

That's your starting point. The car will tell you what it doesn't like. Sure beats guessing


Sent from my big ass iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
 

885.0h

New Member
Jun 27, 2016
17
0
1
'88s don't have a check engine light, so you'll need the dump the codes with a test light, or an innova 3145 code reader.

That's your starting point. The car will tell you what it doesn't like. Sure beats guessing


Sent from my big ass iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
Okay sounds good, with the test light would you count how many flashes like the CEL for KOER, KOEO tests?
 

mikestang63

SN Certified Technician
Aug 27, 2012
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look for rubber coming out of either side of the balancer. It would make he motor run poorly as the timing would be off and also because the balancer could be wobblying
 

885.0h

New Member
Jun 27, 2016
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Well pulled codes was only able to do KOEO test due to car not being able to hold its own idle during KOER test when tested during KOEO car was in neutral

Codes: 67 85 67 85 13 232

Any ideas?

EDIT* just saw failure to keep clutch pushed in generates code 67.. ill be back
 
Last edited:

Mustang5L5

This is a big reason why I pulled it out
Mod Dude
Feb 18, 2001
31,704
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224
Massachusetts
three digit codes don't exist in the fox world. (they do for 94-95's) Might want to rerun and see if the 232 code has been mistaken for something else.

Code 85 is canister purge failure. The charcoal canister. Is it hooked up and present? If it's removed, are the vac lines capped?

Code 13 is the idle not in specified range code. Can you perform an idle reset procedure after cleaning the iAC?
 

885.0h

New Member
Jun 27, 2016
17
0
1
three digit codes don't exist in the fox world. (they do for 94-95's) Might want to rerun and see if the 232 code has been mistaken for something else.

Code 85 is canister purge failure. The charcoal canister. Is it hooked up and present? If it's removed, are the vac lines capped?

Code 13 is the idle not in specified range code.Can you perform an idle reset procedure after cleaning the iAC?
Well while doing the idle reset, on the 3rd crank the starter solenoid started buzzing and throwing sparks, car has done this before only when its ran for abit but when cold its fine could it be Ignition switch? maybe starter? the battery is fine had it checked any ideas thanks
 

jrichker

StangNet's favorite TOOL
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Mar 10, 2000
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No Crank checklist for 5.0 Mustangs

Revised 24-Oct-2013 to update voltage drop figures.

No crank, slow crank and stuck starter solenoid problems have the same root causes – low battery voltage and poor connections. For that reason, they are grouped together.
Use the same initial group of tests to find the root cause of slow crank, no crank and stuck solenoid problems.

Your buzzing solenoid falls in the category

Since some of the tests will bypass the safety interlocks, make sure that the car is in neutral and the parking brake is set. Becoming a pancake isn’t part of the repair process…


1.) Will the car start if it is jumped? Then clean battery terminals and check battery for low charge and dead cells. A good battery will measure 12-13 volts at full charge with the ignition switch in the Run position but without the engine running.
A voltmeter placed across the battery terminals should show a minimum of 9.5-10 volts when the ignition switch is turned to the Start position and the starter engages or tries to engage. Less than this will result in a clicking solenoid, or slow cranking (if it cranks at all) or a starter solenoid that sticks and welds the contacts together.

Most auto parts stores will check your battery for free. It does not have to be installed in the car to have it checked; you can carry it with you to the auto parts store.

The battery posts and inside of the battery post terminals should be scraped clean with a knife or battery post cleaner tool. This little trick will fix a surprising number of no start problems.

The clamp on with 2 bolts battery terminal ends are a known problem causer. Any place you see green on a copper wire is corrosion. Corrosion gets in the clamped joint and works its way up the wire under the insulation. Corroded connections do not conduct electricity well. Avoid them like the plague...

If the starter solenoid welds the contacts, then the starter will attempt to run anytime there is power in the battery. The cables and solenoid will get very hot, and may even start smoking. The temporary fix for a welded starter solenoid is to disconnect the battery and smack the back of the solenoid housing a sharp blow with a hammer. This may cause the contacts to unstick and work normally for a while.


A voltmeter is handy if you are familiar with how to use it to find bad connections. Measure the voltage drop across a connection while trying to start the car: more than .25 volts across a connection indicates a problem. The voltage drop tests need to be done while cranking the engine. It's the current flowing through a connection or wire that causes the voltage drop.

See http://assets.fluke.com/appnotes/automotive/beatbook.pdf for help for help troubleshooting voltage drops across connections and components. .

attachment.php?attachmentid=64167&stc=1&d=1286329941.gif


Voltage drops should not exceed the following:
200 mV Wire or cable
300 mV Switch or solenoid
100 mV Ground
0.0V Connections
A voltage drop lower that spec is always acceptable.

2.) Check the battery to engine block ground down near the oil filter, and the ground behind the engine to the firewall. All grounds should be clean and shiny. Use some sandpaper to clean them up.

3.) Jump the big terminals on the starter solenoid next to the battery with a screwdriver - watch out for the sparks! If the engine cranks, the starter and power wiring is good. The starter relay is also known as a starter solenoid.

The rest of the tech note only concerns no crank problems. If your problem was a stuck solenoid, go back to step 1.

4.) Then pull the small push on connector (small red/blue wire) off the starter solenoid (Looks like it is stuck on a screw). Then jump between the screw and the terminal that is connected to the battery. If it cranks, the relay is good and your problem is in the rest of the circuit.

5.) Remember to check the ignition switch, neutral safety switch on auto trans and the clutch safety switch on manual trans cars. If they are good, then you have wiring problems.

Typical start circuit...
Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds
attachment.php?attachmentid=21328&d=1080916057.gif



6.) Pull the starter and take it to AutoZone or Pep Boys and have them test it. Starter fails test, then replace it. If you got this far, the starter is probably bad.


Starter solenoid wiring for 86-91 Mustang
attachment.php?attachmentid=52294&stc=1&d=1192414749.gif



Starter solenoid wiring 92-93 Mustang or earlier Mustang with upgraded high torque mini starter.
attachment.php?attachmentid=53216&stc=1&d=1201020653.gif


Electrical checks for the switches and starter solenoid

Remove the small red/blue wire from the starter solenoid. Use a screwdriver to bridge the connection from the battery positive connection on the starter solenoid to the small screw where the red/blue wire was connected. The starter should crank the engine. If it does not, the starter solenoid is defective or the battery lacks sufficient charge to crank the engine.

If the starter does crank the engine, the problem is in the clutch safety circuit (5 speed) or Neutral Sense Switch (auto trans) or ignition switch.


See the Typical start circuit diagram above for wiring information for troubleshooting.

You will need a voltmeter or test lamp for the rest of the checks. Connect one lead of the voltmeter or test lamp to ground. The other lead will connect to the item under test.
Look for 12 volts on the white/pink wire when the ignition switch is turned to the Start position. Check the ignition switch first.
No 12 volts, replace the ignition switch.

The next step will require you to push the clutch pedal to the floor (5 speed) or put the transmission in neutral (auto trans) while the ignition switch is turned to the Start position.
Good 12 volts, check the clutch safety switch (5 speed) or Neutral Sense Switch (auto trans) for good 12 volts on both sides of the switches. No 12 volts on both sides of the switch and the switches are defective or out of adjustment. Check the wiring for bad connections while you are at it.