V8 swap on my '66 mustang 200ci engine to v8 302

Shake n' Bake

New Member
Sep 3, 2020
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Arizona
Hello,
I am planning to turn my wifes '66 mustang into a reliable daily driver for her. We currently have a 200ci inline 6 in it that does not run reliably at all. She has always dreamed of having this car as her daily driver but she desperately needs A/C in it as well. I'm thinking of swapping a 302 v8 in it to give it some more power and they seem to be more common to find than a 289. I truthfully don't know much about where to start or what all will need to get done. I can do the work with a friend who is a mechanic to guide me through it so that won't be an issue but I am seeking guidance on what all I need to purchase, upgrade, and change on the vehicle to get it to this point.

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can offer!
 
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'46Ford

Member
Sep 17, 2020
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California
Hello,
I am planning to turn my wifes '66 mustang into a reliable daily driver for her. We currently have a 200ci inline 6 in it that does not run reliably at all. She has always dreamed of having this car as her daily driver but she desperately needs A/C in it as well. I'm thinking of swapping a 302 v8 in it to give it some more power and they seem to be more common to find than a 289. I truthfully don't know much about where to start or what all will need to get done. I can do the work with a friend who is a mechanic to guide me through it so that won't be an issue but I am seeking guidance on what all I need to purchase, upgrade, and change on the vehicle to get it to this point.

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can offer!
It doesn't appear that anyone has responded.

I'm new here and not a mechanic. I had the same thought several years ago but when I really started looking into it I noticed things like the four lug pattern on the rear-end of the Mustang with the 6 cylinder vs the 5 hole pattern on the V8 equipped Mustangs....and the drum brakes all around...

Ultimately, I decided not to do it. It simply appeared to me that I'd have to rebuild the whole car (drivetrain, suspension, brakes) as opposed to a simple engine swap. Again, I'm no mechanic, so I could be wrong be sure to check these potential issues out.

In short, I'd simply rebuild the stock 6 cylinder. It'll be a great, cost efficient, reliable engine for a daily driver. Or purchase another Mustang which simply needs a 289/302 rebuild.

Sorry if I sound negative but I think, based on my past experience and what you've written that you may be getting yourself into more than you bargained for.

Thanks
 

rbohm

SN Certified Technician
Apr 12, 2002
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tucson,az
the problem with swapping a V8 in place of a six is all the parts that need to be replaced as well. you need a V8 transmission, 8" rear end, V8 front spindles, brakes, mounts, drive shaft, plus all the myriad of detail parts necessary to make the swap. oh also a change in steering linkage as well to the V8 linkage.
 

'46Ford

Member
Sep 17, 2020
7
1
13
51
California
the problem with swapping a V8 in place of a six is all the parts that need to be replaced as well. you need a V8 transmission, 8" rear end, V8 front spindles, brakes, mounts, drive shaft, plus all the myriad of detail parts necessary to make the swap. oh also a change in steering linkage as well to the V8 linkage.

Thanks.

You articulated that much better than I.
 

rbohm

SN Certified Technician
Apr 12, 2002
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Thanks.

You articulated that much better than I.

been through this a ton of times. in fact, shake n bake you might want to read this thread for more information;


you may decide that it isnt worth the effort to swap a V8 in place of a six, and instead consider building the six. if so then let me know i can give you lots of good ideas that are inexpensive to where you can build your six to make good power, and still turn in decent fuel economy. and the cost will be a lot less than swapping in a V8, and you can surprise some of the V8 guys with a six.
 
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wicked93gs

10 Year Member
Sep 30, 2006
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An I6 is inherently MORE reliable than a v8 of any type(or v6 or I4)....they are the longest lasting engine design out there, if reliability is the main goal, you should build/rebuild the I6.

the problem with swapping a V8 in place of a six is all the parts that need to be replaced as well. you need a V8 transmission, 8" rear end, V8 front spindles, brakes, mounts, drive shaft, plus all the myriad of detail parts necessary to make the swap. oh also a change in steering linkage as well to the V8 linkage.

On a side-note...or question rather. I understand the reasoning behind swapping to the v8 components and agree with it...just curious as to whether you happen to know if a v8 physically fits using the I6 drag link and other steering components? Or whether the I6 drag link is physically in a slightly different location than the v8 version.
 

rbohm

SN Certified Technician
Apr 12, 2002
6,698
550
204
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tucson,az
An I6 is inherently MORE reliable than a v8 of any type(or v6 or I4)....they are the longest lasting engine design out there, if reliability is the main goal, you should build/rebuild the I6.



On a side-note...or question rather. I understand the reasoning behind swapping to the v8 components and agree with it...just curious as to whether you happen to know if a v8 physically fits using the I6 drag link and other steering components? Or whether the I6 drag link is physically in a slightly different location than the v8 version.

i believe the V8 physically fits with the six cylinder linkage, though some have noted interference with the oil pan. it depends on the engine mounts used, IE factory or aftermarket, and year of the mounts used. for instance the 65 mounts allow the engine to sit a tad lower than the 66 mounts do.