SN95 Wheel Help Needed

Scootiep

Member
Apr 14, 2017
6
2
13
41
New to the forums so sorry in advance if I commit any offenses. So here's my dilemma. My father-in-law (auto-mechanic with his own shop) knows I've been looking for some new rims and wheels for my 1995 GT. Originally it came with the premium 17x8 double 3 spokes. Well, he found a set of 4 Rousch 18x10's with some decent tires on them for $200 and was so stoked he just picked them up for me on the spot. Trouble is, they came off of a 2006 and on my 1995 they're rubbing on the rear shocks and the front strut tower. And before anybody starts giving helpful hints, we've already flipped the rear quad shocks and tried adding 1/4" of spacers just to see if that would work. With the 1/4 spacer the rear's would work (just barely) but the front still rubs on the strut tower.

So now he feels like an ass and since I'm one of the lucky few who actually LIKES their father-in-law (hell, he didn't pull the trigger when I ask to marry his daughter, gotta count for something right?) I'm just wondering if there's anybody out there who has been in a similar situation and would have some advice.

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • Sponsors(?)


90sickfox

Wasn't a pretty sight...and I've got big hands
SN Certified Technician
Mar 2, 2015
5,863
4,978
203
43
Get morosso extended lug nut studs...that way you can add bigger spacers without running out of stud. The front and rear take different studs.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-28-43.png


There should be a lot of room to play with the rear wheels. The easiest way to check the spacer size needed is to jack the rear up with a jack. Remove the wheel...set the new rim by the studs ( lower rear to ride height where the studs lone up with the new wheel sitting on the floor ), place the new wheel where you want it to sit and measure from the back of the wheel to the face of the rotor with a measuring tape.

I wouldn't recommend spacers that aren't hub centric...they should have a lip that the rim sits on if they're thicker than 8mm.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-28-01.png


The best type of spacers are the bolt on type. The downfall is you have to bolt the spacer on the original studs...then trim the ends off the studs. The spacer has another set of studs that bolt to the wheel.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-27-28.png


Hope this helps.... Seeing as those wheels sell for about 500 around here it still wasn't a bad deal.

If you plan on throwing slicks on your car and launching a 500hp 5k clutch drop...don't do it on wheel spacers. Lol
 
  • Like
Reactions: Scootiep

Davedacarpainter

I think I've messed my pants
SN Certified Technician
Nov 28, 2015
11,722
11,458
203
58
Discordia
18x10's for the front? Too wide brother. Great for the rear though. Not a total loss, sell two of them to help pay for some narrower ones for the front.

I wish I had a father in law like yours. Give him a big thumbs up :nice: just for caring enough to do that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Scootiep

Scootiep

Member
Apr 14, 2017
6
2
13
41
That's the long term plan. Hoping to find someone else out there with the same style rims in 18x9's that would like to swap for the extra 2 18x10's I have. Bit as is, at $200 for all 4 rims plus used tires, just couldn't pass them up.
 

Scootiep

Member
Apr 14, 2017
6
2
13
41
Ok, on to the next question. Anybody have any advice on good forums to try and swap 2 of the 18x10's for 2 18x9's of the same style?
 

Attachments

  • IMGA0023.jpg
    IMGA0023.jpg
    125.7 KB · Views: 157

Scootiep

Member
Apr 14, 2017
6
2
13
41
Get morosso extended lug nut studs...that way you can add bigger spacers without running out of stud. The front and rear take different studs.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-28-43.png


There should be a lot of room to play with the rear wheels. The easiest way to check the spacer size needed is to jack the rear up with a jack. Remove the wheel...set the new rim by the studs ( lower rear to ride height where the studs lone up with the new wheel sitting on the floor ), place the new wheel where you want it to sit and measure from the back of the wheel to the face of the rotor with a measuring tape.

I wouldn't recommend spacers that aren't hub centric...they should have a lip that the rim sits on if they're thicker than 8mm.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-28-01.png


The best type of spacers are the bolt on type. The downfall is you have to bolt the spacer on the original studs...then trim the ends off the studs. The spacer has another set of studs that bolt to the wheel.
Screenshot_2017-04-14-23-27-28.png


Hope this helps.... Seeing as those wheels sell for about 500 around here it still wasn't a bad deal.

If you plan on throwing slicks on your car and launching a 500hp 5k clutch drop...don't do it on wheel spacers. Lol
Quick question with those bolt studs, from what I was seeing online, those were for the rear. When I looked for front studs, the ones I was finding were $67 for a single set of 5. Is there a reason the fronts are so much more expensive? Or am I just looking in the wrong place/being duped?

Thanks again!
 

90sickfox

Wasn't a pretty sight...and I've got big hands
SN Certified Technician
Mar 2, 2015
5,863
4,978
203
43
You're being duped... I can't remember where I bought mine from but they were less than that. There's no real reason for the difference in prices. Get the part numbers and do a google search.

The front studs are designed a little different. The gold zinc ones are more expensive than the oxide black ones. Mine are all black.

These are my part numbers and pics of studs. They should be the exact same that you need for your car.
uploadfromtaptalk1475627133387.jpg


There's a notice that says " do not use with wheel spacers " one set of studs. I did some research on the interwebs and chose to ignore this. The other studs don't have the warning. If you're going to go bigger than 1/2 inch I'd recommend getting the spacer adapters that have their own studs.
 
Last edited: