Lower Intake To Head Gasket

Discussion in 'Fox 5.0 Mustang Tech' started by mustangramair, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. mustangramair

    mustangramair Member

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    Hey guys,

    It's been a long time since I posted. I was taking my lower intake off to put a ported lower on. Once I got the intake off, I think it's the number 1 and 5 cylinders (the two front) the runners on the heads were half covered with the lower intake gasket. It looked melted.

    What would cause this? Do you think the two front cylinders are running lean? I have stock fuel rails, I also do not have the car tuned. I'm getting it tuned soon.

    Thanks for any ideas.
     
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  2. stykthyn

    stykthyn Commander of the snuggie cultists

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  3. mustangramair

    mustangramair Member

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    Sorry, I don't. I took the gaskets off. All the other runners were perfect. Just the front two were melted. Since those fuel injectors are at the front, I was wondering if they were starving of fuel and ran hot bc they are lean.
     
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  4. Gearbanger 101

    Gearbanger 101 Straight Outta Locash
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    Probably those crappy FRPP/Felpro "print-0-seal" paper gaskets. They're notorious for distorting over time.

    Did they look similar to this by chance?

    [​IMG]

    These gaskets despite Ford claims, were not designed for long term use. The heat and antifreeze eat them up over time.

    If you can find them, a set of Victor Reinz Nitroseal gaskets are about the best available. They can be tough to get a hold of. Barring that, go with the Felpro steel core gaskets. The steel core will help them keep their shape and prevent them from leaking coolant past the seal, which eventually destroys the gasket.
     
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  5. mustangramair

    mustangramair Member

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    That looks almost spot on!!!! I think my gasket may have hung over the port more. I'll try to get ahold of the better gaskets.
     
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  6. David Pepiton

    David Pepiton Active Member

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    felpros 1250 set isnt all that great a steal cored set is always the way to go with the IM and valve cover since most are also reusable.
     
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  7. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL
    SN Certified Technician Founding Member

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    Tips to make reassembly easier
    Whatever you do, don't skimp on cleaning the gasket surfaces. New gaskets need to seat against bare metal and not the residue left from the old gaskets in order to seal leak free. This is the most time consuming and tiresome part of the job. Put some cardboard in the lifter valley to help catch the gasket scrapings. Have a shop vacuum handy to suck up the scrapings and any coolant that leaked into the lifter valley. Be sure to put a rag or cap in the block where you removed the distributor. It will save you trouble if something falls into the empty distributor hole.

    My favorite trick that saves time and effort is the stay in place gasket. Be sure that you scrape (don't use a wire brush) all the old gasket material off, then clean all the surfaces with acetone or MEK.

    When the surfaces are clean, use weather strip adhesive on the head to manifold surface. Also use the weather strip adhesive on the side of the gasket that mates to the head. When you are done, the head surface and the gasket surface that mate together will have weather strip adhesive on them. Follow the instructions on the tube or can and when it gets tacky, press the gasket down on the head.

    Clean the area where the rubber rails mount to the block in front and in the rear with more acetone or MEK and do the same trick with the weather strip adhesive that you did to the heads.

    Coat the rubber seals and the gasket area around the water passages with Blue Silicone gasket sealer and put it together. TADA! no leaks, and no gaskets that shifted out of place.



    Putting the distributor back in and setting the timing.


    You can forget about anything beyond this point if you don't have access to a timing light. You will never get the timing set right without one.



    Putting the distributor back in is fairly simple. Pull #1 sparkplug, put your finger in the sparkplug hole, crank the engine until you feel compression. Then line up the TDC mark on the balancer with the pointer on the engine block.

    The distributor starts out with the #1 plug wire lined up at about 12:00 with you facing it. Align the rotor to about 11:00, since it will turn clockwise as it slides into place.

    Align the distributor rotor up with the #1 position marked on the cap, slide the distributor down into the block, (you may have to wiggle the rotor slightly to get the gear to engage) and then note where the rotor is pointing.
    If it still lines up with #1 position on the cap, install the clamp and bolt. If not, pull it out and turn 1 tooth forwards or backwards and try again. Put the #1 spark plug back in and tighten it down, put the clamp on the distributor, but don't tighten it too much, as you will have to move the distributor to set the timing. Note that there is no such thing as one tooth off on a 5.0 Mustang. If it doesn't align perfectly with #1 position, you can turn the distributor until it does. The only problem is that if you are too far one way or the other, you can't turn the distributor enough to get the 10-14 degree optimum timing range.


    Setting the timing:
    Paint the mark on the harmonic balancer with paint -choose 10 degrees BTC or 14 degrees BTC or something else if you have NO2 or other power adder. I try to paint TDC red, 10 degrees BTC white and 14 degrees BTC blue.

    10 degrees BTC is towards the drivers side marks.

    Note: setting the timing beyond the 10 degree mark will give you a little more low speed acceleration. BUT you will need to run 93 octane to avoid pinging and engine damage. Pinging is very hard to hear at full throttle, so it could be present and you would not hear it.

    Simplified diagram of what it looks like. Not all the marks are shown for ease of viewing.

    ATC ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '!' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' BTC
    ---------------- > Direction of Rotation as viewed standing in front of the engine.

    The ' is 2 degrees.
    The ! is TDC
    The ' is 10 degrees BTC
    Set the timing 5 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 5 marks towards the driver's side to get 10 degrees.

    To get 14 degrees, set it 7 marks BTC. Or if you prefer, 7 marks towards the driver's side to get 14 degrees.

    The paint marks you make are your friends if you do it correctly. They are much easier to see that the marks machined into the harmonic balancer hub.

    At this point hook up all the wires, get out the timing light. Connect timing light up to battery & #1 spark plug. Then start the engine.

    Remove the SPOUT connector (do a search if you want a picture of the SPOUT connector) It is the 2 pin rectangular plug on the distributor wiring harness. Only the EFI Mustang engines have a SPOUT. If yours is not EFI, check for a SPOUT: if you don’t find one, skip any instructions regarding the SPOUT
    Warning: there are only two places the SPOUT should be when you time the engine. The first place is in your pocket while you are setting the timing and the second is back in the harness when you finish. The little bugger is too easy to lose and too hard to find a replacement.

    Start engine, loosen distributor hold down with a 1/2" universal socket. Shine the timing light on the marks and turn the distributor until the mark lines up with the edge of the timing pointer. Tighten down the distributor hold down bolt, Replace the SPOUT connector and you are done.

    The HO firing order is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.
    Non HO firing order is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. mustangramair

    mustangramair Member

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    Thanks for the help!
     
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