P.M.S.-How To's, User Guides, Tuning Tips, Articles.

Discussion in '1994 - 1995 Specific Tech' started by VibrantRedGT, Jan 24, 2006.

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  1. VibrantRedGT

    VibrantRedGT "STANGNET'S PENGUIN SMACKER"
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    What is a P.M.S and what does it do?

    [​IMG]
    Unlock the Performance Potential of your ECC-IV with Engine Tuning Adjustability Not Available in any Performance "Chip"!

    The P.M.S. goes far beyond the capabilities of a performance "chip", offering a broad selection of adjustments and tuning. Now you can take advantage of aftermarket performance components while still using the stock engine control computer! Step up to the P.M.S. and move into tomorrow's world of performance!

    The Series III PMS for 89-95 ECC-IV Mustang has some great new features in addition to all the other great features it already has.

    * Now comes with global fuel adjustments, which means you can offset the mass air for different sized injectors.

    * Air charge temp and Water temp fuel and timing adjustments can now be made from -40 to +250 degrees

    * TPS volts are now adjustable: What this means is if you want 1.05 to be idle you put that in. The same with W.O.T. - you tell the PMS what volts.

    * NEW! Easier to use controller with adjustments down to 500 rpm increments starting at 2000 rpm

    * NEW! for 2004 single data display screens let you monitor spark timing, injector function, oxygen sensor, water temp, air charge temp., mass air voltage and manifold pressure/vacuum

    * Start fuel setting, which controls the injector when the starter is turning the motor over. This gets rid of the hard starting with 42 lb. injector or bigger.

    * Air Fuel Mixture fully adjustable.

    * Idle Mixture and Timing fully adjustable.

    * Stand alone turn on is now adjustable: The stand alone is set up to turn on at 3500rpm, which can be adjusted from 2000 rpm to 5600 rpm. The factory EEC has no control in standalone mode. This gives us even better fuel and timing control and now the Rev limiter can be moved to as high as 9900 rpm with a faster processor.

    * Total spark and rate-of-advance fully adjustable.

    * Two step rev-limiter.

    * Two programmable RPM/Throttle output accessory control switches.

    * Tunable Nitrous Oxide Adjustment Table.

    * Tunable Turbo or Supercharger timing and fuel adjustment up to 30lb of boost.

    * Purple anodized, finned aluminum case resists corrosion, dirt and moisture!

    * Easy installation in less than one hour.

    * Plug in and Run” installations requires no programming—Just start it up and go!

    * Increased RAM, EPROM, and EEPROM Internal Memory Capacity!

    * Easy “User Friendly” operation—detailed owner’s manual explains all functions.




    USER MANUALS:
    94-95 Series III User Manual (1.6MB Adobe Acrobat File)
    http://www.andersonfordmotorsport.com/pms/ControllerUsersGuideEECIV7-2004.pdf

    94-95 Series II User Manual (267KB Adobe Acrobat File)
    http://www.andersonfordmotorsport.com/pms/Fordinst.pdf


    ARTICLES
    February 05 Race Pages Article on the P.M.S.
    http://www.andersonfordmotorsport.com/media/efimagic.htm

    August 04 MM&FF Article on the P.M.S
    http://www.andersonfordmotorsport.com/media/pmsfamily.htm

    June 04 5.0 Article on the P.M.S.
    http://www.andersonfordmotorsport.com/media/piggyback.htm





    TUNING TIPS
    Series III Model ECC-IV PMS Tuning Tips

    To start off with lets set the throttle position sensor, so the PMS is on the right load tables. Warm the car up to operating temperature (180-198). Do this with a drive, don't just let it sit and idle. Set your base idle (with the idle motor unplugged) at 850-900 rpm with the throttle screw. Now check your T.P. sensor voltage with a volt meter. Take that voltage (lets say it is 1.04 volts) and go into the PMS option to TPS voltage and set idle voltage to 1.06. Now turn off key and turn it back on. It should say idle now on the data screen. If not readjust voltage numbers until it does. This gets the PMS in sink with the load table.

    Stand alone
    With your base timing set at 10 degrees and the stand alone turned on with nothing in the PMS, the total timing is 25 degrees at W.O.T. above the rpm and throttle position you chose to turn on the stand alone. Air fuel is 12.8 to 1 at W.O.T. with a correctly calibrated Pro-M mass air meter in the stand alone tables.

    Knowing this, it is easy to tune if you know how much timing you want. If you want 32 degrees at wide open throttle at 6000 rpm, you put +7 at WOT at 6000 rpm in the PMS and this will give you 32 degrees total at 6000 rpm.

    Timing ranges for 5.0 Mustang:
    Natural Aspirated on pump gas 9.5 compression 29-32 degrees total advance at 6000 rpm.
    Supercharged on pump gas 14 lb of boost 17-21 degrees total advance at 6000 rpm.

    The trick to tuning the timing is the curve not just the total advance. You have to experiment with this and see what your combination likes. The same goes for the fuel curve.

    Understanding the boost tables
    I will try to explain this best as I can. Let's say your car has 14lb of boost at 6000 rpm. If you have the boost table turned on in the PMS and have the max boost set at 20 lb. you have at MAX boost 6000 rpm -10. This will give you a total timing at 6000 rpm with 14 lb of boost 18 degrees.

    How to calculate this out is by the following: Take the timing you have in max boost (-10) and divide it by the setting you have in for max boost which is 20, then multiply it by the cars max boost at 6000 rpm. So it will look like this: -10 divided by 20 times 14 = -7. That means the PMS will pull 7 degrees out of your base of 25. So you will have 18 degrees.

    If you have timing put in at WOT, let's say you have +4, that would be included with the boost timing so you would have 22 degrees at 6000 and 14lb of boost.


    I hope this helps

    Rick Anderson


    Series II Model ECC-IV PMS Tuning Tips
    To start off with lets set the throttle position sensor, so the PMS is on the right load tables.

    Warm the car up to operating temperature (180-198) - do this with a drive. Don't just let it sit and idle. Set your base idle (with the idle motor unplugged) at 850-900 rpm with the throttle screw. Adjust your T.P. sensor (you will usually have to file bigger slots in the T.P. sensor to accomplish this) so the PMS hand held says idle in the top left hand corner. The easiest way to do this is after you have set the base idle, shut off the car and turn the key on (engine not running) and put the PMS hand held on the dash so you can see it through the windshield and adjust the T.P. sensor until it says idle. Now plug the idle motor back in. Finally, check to make sure that when the pedal is on the floor it says W.O.T. in the top left corner.

    Stand Alone
    With your base timing set at 10 degrees and the stand alone turned on with nothing in the PMS, the total timing is 25 degrees above 4000 rpm and Air/Fuel is 12.8 to 1 with a correctly calibrated Pro-M mass air meter.

    Knowing this, it is easy to tune if you know how much timing you want. If you want 32 degrees at wide open throttle at 6000 rpm, you put +7 at WOT at 6000 rpm in the PMS and this will give you 32 degrees total at 6000 rpm.

    Timing range for 5.0 Mustang -
    Natural Aspirated: pump gas 9.5:1 compression 29-32 degrees total advance at 6000 rpm.
    Super Charged: pump gas 14 lb of boost 17-21 degrees total advance at 6000 rpm. The trick to tuning the timing is in the curve not just the total advance. You have to experiment with and see what your combination likes. The same goes for the fuel curve.
    Understanding the Boost Tables
    I will try to explain this the best as I can. Let's say your car has 14lb of boost at 6000 rpm. If you have the boost turned on in the 900 menu and have the max boost set at 20 lb. in the 600 menu you have at MAX boost 6000 rpm -10. This will give you a total timing at 6000 rpm with 14lb of boost 18 degrees.

    How to calculate this out: Take the timing you have in 600 max boost -10 divided by the setting you have in max boost in 900 which is 20 and times it by the cars max boost at 6000 rpm. So it will look like this -10 divided by 20 times 14 = -7. That means the PMS will pull 7 degrees out of your base of 25. So you will have 18 degrees.

    If you have timing put in at WOT which is menu 300: Let's say you have +4. That would be included with the boost timing so you would have 22 degrees at 6000 and 14lb of boost.


    I hope this helps

    Rick Anderson
     
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  2. VibrantRedGT

    VibrantRedGT "STANGNET'S PENGUIN SMACKER"
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    Wideband for PMS and Interacq
    by: Gary (gw342)

    PMS

    Which wideband?
    The ONLY wideband that will correctly read on the PMS' handheld (without the optional Interacq software) is the AFM UEGO1000.

    Which PMS?
    To use a wideband with ONLY the PMS, you must first have a 2004 model PMS or an older one with the 2004 upgrade chipset.

    When you select the "Wideband" option in the PMS, it will look for the wideband voltage and display it on the handheld, converted into the air/fuel ratio.

    Install
    The UEGO1000 needs to be installed separate from the factory O2 sensors, as it is a standalone unit. The factory O2 sensors are needed for the EEC to do its basic functions (see below). You need to weld a separate bung in the exhaust, at least 30" from the cylinder head. Overheating can be a problem. Actually, it is just as accurate and even safer if it is located further down the exhaust on the H/X pipe, before the junction. Stay clear of the junction of the pipies. You wan tone clean signal from either the left or the right side exhaust. If you have catalytic converters, try to place it ahead of the converter. Remember, dynos just shove a wideband into your tailpipe, after the mufflers and catalytics, so it isn't critical to keep the wideband near the exhaust header. These widebands have their own heat source and will operate even if installed further down away from the header collector.

    Wire it up...
    On BOTH the EEC4 and EEC5 you can wire in the wideband input into EITHER of the O2 receiving ports on the PMS' small connector. Look for the two connectors on the opposite end from the EEC adapter end of the PMS' wiring harness. Look at the small connector. You should find reference letters and numbers on it, B1 through B12.

    EEC4. You need to locate the B10(=Right O2) or the B11(=Left O2) ports. I suggest splicing in at a convenient place along either wire from the B10 or B11 port, where you will have enough room to get tools in there, etc. Don't cut the wire too close to the PMS connector!

    EEC5. You need to locate the A5(=Left O2) or A6(=Right O2) ports on the large connector. Follow the same installation advice above.

    With the UEGO1000 you splice the red wire in the gray jacketed set of cables. Next, run a wire from the ground the UEGO1000 by splicing the black wire to B12 on the PMS.

    Do not be confused that you are losing the narrow band, factory O2 inputs here. If you added the UEGO1000 in a separate bung, and it is operating independent of the 2 factory O2s, then all is good. The EEC will still see those factory O2s, and operate as normal. If you removed one of the factory O2s and replaced it with the UEGO1000, then you may experience driving quality issues, as the EEC will only read the one factory O2. I advise against this.

    Regardless of which port you splice into, you are NOT defeating the narrow band inputs to the EEC. Remember, the PMS is seeing the O2 signals after the fact. When you splice into the PMS' connector, you are merely replacing the O2 signal from the EEC with the one from the UEGO1000. The EEC has already seen that O2 signal and used it for calculations. The PMS just passes that signal along so you can see it and know what's going on.

    You can mount the UEGO1000 display anywhere you want, it will be active even while connected to the PMS. You will be taking the output wire off the UEGO1000 and splicing it into one of the ports on the PMS' large connector. What port you splice it into depends on what model EEC you are operating.

    INTERACQ/INTERLOG and Alternate Widebands

    What wideband can I use?
    Any wideband that you can find, as long as it is a 0-5 volt output, and you know the conversion scale for volts to a/f ratio. Examples of widebands that will work are the PLX, Zeitronix, UEGO1000, LamdaBoy, DIY, AEM, the LM-1 and most others.

    Install
    If you are using a standlone wideband, one like the UEGO1000, then you should follow the installation as outlined at the top of this post. If you are running a dual band kit, like the PLX, you can substitute the wideband for aone of the factory narrow band O2s, as long as it isn't too close to the cylinder head. If you are running short tube headers, I would advise against swapping the wideband with a factory O2, as the heat may disrupt the accuracy of the unit. I would suggest you weld in a separate bung. If you have long tube headers, then you should be fine to swap the wideband for one of the narrow band factory O2s located in the collectors. Again, keep in mind that dynos use tailpipe widebands that work just fine. If you place the wideband a bit downstream you are playing it safe and not affecting the readings. I have been told to avoid the cross-over junction, but I have never seen a wideband placed there so I have no direct experience on how that would impact the readings. I suggest using common sense in the install, and avoid turbulent areas or excessive heat.

    Wire it up.
    The Interacq and InterLog follow the exact same installation instructions as the PMS, as the Interacq and InterLog are just fancy replacements for the handheld via a laptop. Follow whatever wiring instructions came with your particular wideband. If you installed a dual band kit, AND you installed the wideband in-place of one of the factory O2s, then you will need to splice the narrow output from your kit into the corresponding O2 input into your EEC. Otherwise, all you need to do here is take the 0-5volt output wire or source from your existing wideband and splice it into one of the ports as discussed above under EEC4 or EEC5.

    How do I get my non-UEGO1000 to display the correct a/f?
    You need to create a Conversion file, and add it to the Configuration table. PM me for details. J/k.

    Okay. The first thing is to make a Conversion file based on the voltage output to a/f ratio of your particular wideband.

    Open the Interacq, click on Data Log>Setup>Conversion Files. You will see the Conversion File creator open. In the Part Number, Description, Title you can just enter the name of your Wideband or similar info. This is not necessary, but a convenience. Under Units enter something like "a/f". This stuff will be seen on the Data Log graphs later on and make for a nice way to reference.

    Set the Precision to "2". Don't ask why.

    Now, in the lower left corner you'll see the Set Points. Then you should see Volt and Value with 2 blank cells under them. You can use the Insert key to create more cells. What this means is the Volt cells are the volt readings from your wideband. The Value cells will be the corresponding a/f ratio YOUR wideband has set, given the volts. If at 1.0 volts your wideband is reading the a/f as 10.5:1, then your Volts cell would have "1.0" and the Value cell immediately to the right would have "10.5" in it. You should create as many Set Points as necessary to give an accurate breakdown for the Interacq to use. When you are finished creating your SetPoints, then go to the right and click on Value under the Values side of the window. You should see your volts and a/f interpolated and broken-down into a much more detailed set of cells. You are done. Save the File under whatever name you want. now we have to go put it into the Configuration Editor.

    Click on Data Log>Setup>Configuration.
    A window pops up saying something about altering parameters crap and tech assit and whatever. Go for it, click OK. Now, Click on File>Open. A new window opens, and here you need to define the type EEC you are using. If you are not sure, think about what type of MAP sensor you can run, if you use a 3 bar sensor, then that is your EEC type. The Interacq and InterLog actually show you the type EEC you have when you connect them, that info is in the lower part of the status bar area on your laptop.

    Now you will see the grand configuration table. Knowing which O2 port you used, Left or Right, you can alter the way that port uses its information. Let's use the common Left O2 signal is now the new wideband signal. Under "Assign," find the Left O2. Its probably #2. Its Title reads "Left O2". Well, click on that and delete it, type in something like "WB" or "Wideband." Click on the Units cell, and type in "a/f." Double-click the File cell, and a little browse box should appear, looking like a little gray box with 3 dots in it. Click on that. It opens the Interacq Folder, and now all you gotta do is go find your new conversion file. Double click your saved conversion file. Scale and Port leave alone. Size, type in "1" and don't ask why. You're finshed! WooHoo!

    Now, open the program, and open the monitor. Make sure the monitor form displays the Left O2. It should read the converted a/f once you fire-up the car. The new wideband will be recorded same as all the other inputs, when you trigger the recorder.
     
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  3. VibrantRedGT

    VibrantRedGT "STANGNET'S PENGUIN SMACKER"
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    Timing Curve
    by Gary (gw342)

    Basic Timing Curve Ideas
    You can try a couple of wot timing ideas, and it can depend on the engine being n/a or not. For n/a, I prefer to just run slightly higher timing early on in the rpm band and step it down gradually by redline. Say, 32* at 2000rpm slowly dropping to 30*ish at 6000rpm, that idea. In my experience, this has worked pretty well on different n/a motors on the dyno.

    Another idea is the old tried and true lock in timing. You set the PMS at wot to keep the timing consistent at the same value, like 32*, all the way across the rpm range. That works well too. It really depends on the engine, fuel, etc.

    Yet another timing curve is to replicate a factory strategy used early on, and that is the opposite of my first suggestion. Start with say 28*-29* and slowly ramp it up to 32* by redline.

    BTW, the timing numbers I am giving are strictly for example. Be aware of what compression ratio you have and what gasoline quality you run.

    If all this isn't enough for ya, lol, the forced induction guys sometimes use a timing curve that mirrors the torque of the engine. Say your torque is peaked and flat from 4000-4500rpm. On either side of those rpms the torque is less. Well, in the maximum torque rpms (4k-4.5k) you would run your lowest total timing, say 28*, and have it ramp up to 32* at each end of the rpm range. Example, 2k=32* slowly dropping to 28* at 4k. From 4.5k to 6k the timing would slowly ramp back up to 30*-32*. The basic idea is that at peak torque, you are at peak compression in the chamber. Mind you, those are typical n/a numbers for a moderate compression motor, certainly not for a street blown engine. The timing numbers would be substantially lower.

    Blower motor timing can be somewhat aggressive like a n/a car until the boost builds. That means, you can look at tuning wot timing the same as if the blower wasn't on the engine. That is when the blower fuel and timing tables are to be used. As you get into boost, most guys have success with retarding timing by 1* per 1psi. So at 1psi in the PMS, you enter -1*, and set your max boost number and max boost timing number to be the same. Most street guys don't push over 20psi, so that is the commonly seen tune. In that case, max boost is set to 20, and max boost timing is set to -20*. That way, for each psi boost, you pull 1* timing. When setting up your timing for boost, make sure the end result is a gradual retarding of timing to peak boost. What the magic number is varies from engine to engine, and if you use intercooling of some sort. A safe, general number is around 18* total at max boost, then inch it up to suit your needs. Most guys have reported that 19* to 22* is possible on 91-93 octane, 9:1, 14psi non-intercooled engines. Just be careful not to get greedy, lol.

    Air Fuel Ratio Ideas
    The optimum afr can depend on a lot of things, but generally 12.5-13.0 generates top power for most gasoline engines. Similar to the forced induction timing thinking, you want to run slightly richer a/f at peak torque. If you go richer by a point say to 11.5, the power will drop a bit, however, if you go leaner by a point to say 14.0, the power can drop dramatically at wot. All this is in regards to n/a motors. Nitrous and forced induction will respond differently and have different needs.

    Nitrous can be safely run almost as lean as 12.0-12.5 range. Make sure to follow the kit's recommended timing and fuel. Blowers will run great at 10.75 to 11.5 AFR, at the moderate timing levels I mentioned above. Again, if you lean the AFR, then be careful with the timing. It is always best to be patient, run low total timing and rich AFR then work toward your goals.

    Keep in mind too, if you start making changes, that reducing timing can have the same effect as adding fuel and vice versa. And simply adding a ton of fuel will not allow you to go ahead and add in a ton of timing.

    Making changes to PMS Fuel
    You asked if you need to make large changes to the PMS for a/f changes. As Chris pointed out, it could be either way. What determines how much fuel you need to work with in the PMS is how much airflow is being pushed in. The fuel adjustment in the PMS is a % of the duty cycle at that moment, not the total available fuel injector timing. At larger duty cycles you'll see more fuel with small changes. If you tune it on the dyno, simply try adding/reducing your fuel in the pms by 2-4% at a time, and see what the wideband says.

    My suggestions are based on my experiences over several hundred dyno pulls on several cars. I have not worked with all the different blowers or nitrous kits, however, this has been a hobby of mine over the years. My recommendations are not set in stone! I always started with the general safe tune, and then tuned to the specific engine at hand. Depending on where you bought your gear, you should take advantage of advice from guys like Brian K or Rick at AFM, Doug W. (EFI Systems PMS creator/engineer), DynotuneMP(Mike Post) and Flyin Hawaiin(Bob Kurgan). There are others, I am just naming a few I know well or who frequent this glorious website, lol.

    Bottom line: always make small changes! Large changes in AFR or timing can be potentially devastating. Good Luck!
     
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  4. VibrantRedGT

    VibrantRedGT "STANGNET'S PENGUIN SMACKER"
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    Accel Feature
    by: Gary (gw342)

    Here is a full explanation of the Accel feature of the PMS. This is from EFI System's literature and my personal experiences.

    Basically, the accel stuff deals with the tune of the motor when the throttle position is changed. It can alter the amount of fuel and timing for a brief time period based on the change in throttle position.

    If you are finding that you have brief tuning problems when you begin to add throttle, then this will work for you. The most common use seems to be for tip-in detonation, however it can be useful for fine tuning fuel as well.

    First, to get this accel stuff active, you need to go to the Settings menu (900). There, depending on the PMS model, you should come across Accel SENS and Accel RCVR. The new PMS shows the Accel SENS as "Response." Either way, this first adjustment, Accel Sens, is the the throttle response sensitivity. The lower the number the more sensitive to throttle changes, "1" is the most sensitive, while "20" is the least sensitive. This refers to how quickly the PMS will use the fuel/timing adjustments you enter in the Accel fuel and Timing tables. A value of 1 will set the pms to recognize the slightest ~1% throttle position change. A value of 4 will tell the PMS to hold off on using the accel fuel/timing adjustments for approximately ~5-8% throttle position. This is from personal experience, and I use this an an example only, for an approximate reference.

    The Accel Rcvr is the recovery time that will sustain the adjustments once the Accel tables are active. A value of "1" is the shortest duration while "99" is the longest duration. Each increase is APPROX .1 seconds duration, as the time frame is actually determined by the ignition firing. With higher rpms, the recover will shorten in duration. This shouldn't deter you from using the accel feature, as most of the time its usefulness is in the lower rpms.

    The actual fuel and timing adjustments are made in the Accel Tables, 800 menu. Depending on the PMS or the use of the InterACQ, you can adjust the fuel and timing same as you do in the other tuning tables. The basic pms will allow adjustments at 2200, 4000, 6000, and 7800. The 2004 version will allow adjustments every 500 rpm. It all depends on what you have. Regardless of the PMS model, you can make this work for you.

    Here is an example. If you set the Accel Sens to "1," you will activate the Accel fuel/timing upon the instant the throttle is moved...the change I have noticed is as small as 1% of the TPS reading. So if you are at 3% TPS just cruising at 2300rpm, and you accelerate a bit, say open the throttle to 18%, the moment your TPS went from the static 3% at cruise to 4% as you touched the gas (you can imagine the extremely short time frame we are working in here), the Accel table fuel and timing values in the 2200rpm range will be thrown into the total adjustments. I have always ended-up setting Accel Sens to 1. I find that to eliminate tip-in detonation, I need that timing adjustment in the Accel table to hit immediately. It works rather well.

    Continuing on this example, say you went to 18% throttle then backed off again to cruising and were at 3%. Depending on what you set the Accel Rcvr to, you will continue to get the Accel fuel/timing adjustments. So, the trick is, to determine how long you need the tip-in adjustment to stay. I have found anything over "9" in the recover tends to interfere with WOT performance and quick acceleration lane changes. To rid myself of tip-in detonation, I use "5." There is no exact time frame for this recovery effect, I have tried to pin it down but it never seems to be exact. I would say that for each increase in Recovery value, ie. from 1 to 2, etc...the time is approximately a tenth of a second. GENERALLY. If you have "20" in the Accel RCVR, the Accel settings will hold for about 2 seconds. Doesn't seem long, but try it on the dyno or on the street, and you may notice too much adjustment and the car may feel sluggish. Experiment here...it is easy to do...just add enough recover time to solve your tuning problem and leave it.

    I used to believe that just making adjustments in the load tables where I thought I was experiencing problems would suffice. But the EECIV likes to alter tip-in timing and fuel, and this accel feature is an easy way to get around it.
     
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  5. VibrantRedGT

    VibrantRedGT "STANGNET'S PENGUIN SMACKER"
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