Problem w/ my Ranger

Discussion in 'Other Auto Tech' started by Venom351R, Jul 25, 2008.


  1. Venom351R

    Venom351R Founding Member

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    I have a 2000 Ford Ranger and recently its developed a "hitching" or "bucking" as a best way to describe it while driving. It does it at interstate speeds and around town speeds. Does it while stopped and moving. At times the hitching is worse then other times, sometimes its minor other times its like the whole truck is shaking. I had the fuel filter changed on the last service. Could it be electrical since I'm sure the plugs/wires need to be changed. Any suggestions or thoughts?
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  2. timeless2

    timeless2 Vi Veri Veni Versum Vicus Vici Admin Dude

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    What engine/transmission does it have? Mileage?
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  3. Venom351R

    Venom351R Founding Member

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    A Its an auto, just had a tranny fluid change when the fuel filter was done. its a 4.0 V6 w/ 99,300 on it.
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  4. Darkwriter77

    Darkwriter77 Resident Ranting Negative Nancy

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    Is it throwing any trouble codes? :shrug:

    I had those exact symptoms with a '91 Trans Am I had, and it turned out to be a bad EGR valve ... which was kind of a PITA to get to on that 350 TPI motor (had to remove the upper intake plenum). It would try to lurch forward at stoplights and would sort of surge and lightly buck at steady cruise at any speed.

    Could be the EGR valve, itself, or something related - blocked EGR passages, bad EGR valve position sensor (EVP), or a problem with vacuum/electrical connection to EGR valve (and/or EGR valve control solenoid/EVP, if equipped).

    Could also possibly be the TPS (throttle position sensor).

    Pull codes and, if there's anything stored, that'll give you a direction to look.
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  5. Venom351R

    Venom351R Founding Member

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    Thanks DW I'll have to try that. I thought it could have also been fuel related such as water in the lines. Isn't there an auto parts store that pulls codes for free, I thought it may have been Autozone :shrug:
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  6. timeless2

    timeless2 Vi Veri Veni Versum Vicus Vici Admin Dude

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    I think so.


    I used to have a 1993 Ranger with the 4.0L. Never had any problems with relation to what you describe...under normal operation. The only time I experienced anything close to what you talked about is when I got caught in a flash flood situation and the streets were flooded badly. Water must have hit just right, on the ignition module box at the rear of the engine bay; it stalled and didn't restart until after it dried out for a bit.

    The rest of the drive home that day, the engine missed and there was a noticeable shudder under load. After I got home, I pulled the module off, took all the plug wires off, and dried everything with a high-powered fan. She was as good as new the next morning when I went to work.

    That personal story leads me to my question. Is the bad performance you experience during humid or rainy weather?
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  7. Venom351R

    Venom351R Founding Member

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    It has been humid and or very heavy rains from thunderstorms over the past few wks. That is possible as well. Thanks Tim

    Any possibility it could be the battery terminal? I noticed my Positive side had a lot of corrosion on it
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