5.0 Explorer Swap in 66-keeping it distributorless

MARKDTN

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I have a 1966 Mustang that I bought in about 2002. It was originally a 6-cyl/3-sp. The original engine was rebuilt in 1982 and 2 weeks later they hit a deer. He went and bought NOS fenders for it (which I still have) and then it sat. I replaced the floor pans and patched the cowl. I sold the original engine, transmission, and rearend and put in a 302/AOD out of an ’84 van with Granada brakes and rear axle but my heart was just not in a carbed motor (but now I have manifolds, mounts, oil pan, etc.). I want fuel injection. So I pulled that out and bought an ’88 Cougar from an impound auction for $62. I put in that 5.0/AOD in and was close to hearing it run in 2005 when we moved here. I had hoped that one or both of my sons would get interested, but they were not. So I spent those years with the Mustang in the garage corner and doing the things that the boys wanted to do. Both boys have now gone on to college, so I am ready to start back on the car. The donor Cougar was rough and the engines in these are so underpowered. I heard it run a few seconds but no idea on transmission condition. I am now thinking that I will buy a running 96-01 2wd 5.0 Explorer and put the complete engine and transmission in and disk brake rear (shortened). I am not scared of wiring or fuel lines. I am a fairly experienced fabricator (I built a 2N tractor with flathead V8 and done many GM FI swaps among other things). I have read and read on this but it is hard to find somebody to talk to that has actually done this. I don’t care about GT40 vs: GT40P heads, but I would like the upgraded transmission in 98 if I can. My thought is to use the donor Explorer harness and stock PCM. I will use the motor bone stock. Where I get confused is where/how to get the PCM programmed. I want to remove PATS (98 up), rear O2s, and any tank pressure stuff. HP tuners does not support these. SCT seems to, but the site says it won’t remove emissions stuff. Other places mention Quarterhorse but hard to tell what it needs to go with it. I just need a push in the right direction. Who can program a stock Explorer PCM to remove what I don’t want so I can make this one work? Or what programmer and/or software will do what I need? I do NOT want to put in a distributor and convert to earlier Mustang stuff. I will convert the speedo to electronic. Is it better to stay 96-97 to avoid PATS? Any advice? Thank you!
 
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a91what

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have you considered using a standalone ECU? a megasquirt or even a cheap little microsquirt will do that job no problem and let you fully tune the engine. you can keep the EDIS ignition and it will work with all the factory sensors, you can choose to either run it speed density or MAF your choice.
you can check out diyautotune.com or even stinger.com to purchase the unit from.

not sure if anyone has a pnp ecu for the explorer harness @Stinger may be able to shed some light on that.

if it were me i would only use what i needed out of the harness and ditch the rest.
 

MARKDTN

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I have considered that, but would like to keep the electronic transmission. I have an AOD that was good almost 20 years ago (out of the '84 van) and the unknown one from the Cougar but I would rather stay all 1 integrated driveline so parts are easier to specify later. My plan was to buy an Explorer and do the PCM changes/program before I knock it in the head. That way I know it ran and there would only be wiring to blame if it won't start (I haven't had one yet that didn't). I have read about 1 guy that did this in a Bronco I think that kept the Explorer wiring. He had issues with PATS. I just think there has to be somebody out there that can work on the PCM. If this was GM stuff it is easy to get this done. Surely somebody can do this for a Ford? Or I can just stay 96-97 and avoid PATS but I still have to deal with rear O2s and OBD2 fuel tank monitoring stuff. I want a "no SES light on" installation. My goal is to drive this Summer 2020 on Route 66 with a friend. The car is coming out of the corner in a couple weeks, I'm cleaning the garage now. One other question that I have not seen answered is will the Explorer accessories work in a 66? I know I will have to adapt power steering and make a/c lines, but will they physically fit? I will figure out a dipstick (tube) if I have to weld it into the pan.
 

a91what

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megasquirt can do transmission control as well if you cant find someone to do the tune for you. I can tune MS i do not mess with OEM ECU.. you can ask around on efidynotuning.com they may be able to help you with a tune of some kind.
 

a91what

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I did not know that MS could control the trans. Interesting. I may look into that if I can't go stock. Thank you!
technically it will require 2 ECU... one for the engine and a microsquirt with firmware making it a 'TCU' or a transmission control unit. they talk to each other over canbus.. you can do this on the cheap if you wanted to.
there is also the option of using a baumann controller for the trans. let us know what you decide to do, with the MS you could even do some cool stuff like paddle shifters and such.
 

MARKDTN

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My vision for the car is very stock looking 1966 Mustang. 14" wheels with pony wheel covers. Stock inside. I want it to be reliable and quick. Fuel injection and overdrive make these old cars faster than new (stock) with better mileage. When I was in high school in the mid-80s several guys had 65/66 289 Mustangs (and then there was the 2 red/black '69 fastbacks-a 428CJ/4-sp and a 351/auto with nitrous-and the family acquaintance with a '69 Shelby GT500KR convertible) and I had a boss with a 66 4-sp GT that the original motor was gone and it had a '70s 302 /2bbl smog truck motor and it was still fast! I always wanted one of those early ones. So here I am 30+ years later building one. I have pulled the original straight steering box and put in a 67L collapsible column and steering box. Added front disc brakes and will add rear although rear is not as helpful. I want it safe and stock looking with parts I can buy at any parts store in the country. That is why I prefer stock if I can make it work.
 
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MARKDTN

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So for my knowledge, which MegaSquirt kits would I need? Looks like a MS3 with MS3X for the engine and what would I use for the transmission? I would just create my own harness by cutting up a factory one to get the plugs? Is it worth it to buy them DIY or complete built is best? (I'm not scared of soldering a board)
 

a91what

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You can save money if your solder savvy. The ms3x is the most bang for the buck and can do just about any damn thing.

Look at the microsquirt to use as the transmission controller.

I make my own harness but I like to do that kind of stuff.
 

marshall69

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I put a crank trigger 5 litre Windsor from an Australian AU Falcon in my 66. Transferred the whole Falcon wiring loom after cutting out all wires I did not want and kept the stock ECU. This has given me electric mirrors, window, seats, variable wipers, etc. Mine was a manual 5 speed which I have recently swapped for a non electric AOD. The combination works great. 300HP and all stock sensors so the (old) Ford mechanics know how to diagnose and fix any problems.
 

MARKDTN

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This is the follow-up to my request for information. I feel that if you ask for info on a web board you should post an answer if you get one. Short story, it is possible to put an Explorer 5.0/4R70W in a ’66 Mustang in OBD2 trim without a distributor and without changing to a Mustang computer. It is possible to get the PCM programmed to a non-emissions version and delete PATS. It is possible to use the Explorer front cover and a front sump dipstick. It’s not running yet, but it won’t be long.

Long story. I started with a ’66 Mustang with a not-quite-running ’88 Cougar 5.0/AOD conversion I started 15+ years ago mentioned in the top post. Last year I picked up where I left off and made improvements. Battery relocated to trunk. Shortened 8.8 Explorer rear. Borgeson steering. Etc. Was to the point of hearing it run, but was not happy with the prospect of the Cougar 5.0 and it’s 150HP. When the injectors were bad after sitting 15+ years and I noticed the TV cable to the transmission was not connected to the throttle body (bushing gone), I drew a line in the sand and said no more-but I did borrow a set of injectors so I could hear it start and it did. Pulled the engine and transmission and sold them. I wanted an Explorer 5.0 with the improved 4R70W transmission. I bought a wrecked AWD 5.0 2000 Mountaineer. I bought a 2wd transmission from the pick-a-part. I sent the PCM to “The EFI Guy” Garry in Colorado. He is the key to all of this. He turned off PATS, EGR, and all the fuel tank sensors. I pulled the PCM from the yard-driving truck and sent to him. He turned it quickly and I was able to put it back in the truck and drive it into the shop to pull the engine. Removed the main engine compartment wiring harness from the C115 engine connector. Since it was wrecked and the front end, radiator, and condenser was ruined I cut most of the nose off with a Sawzall. Disconnected the transmission from the transfer case (you really need a ½” half-moon wrench for this-OR-pull the access cover). Pulled the driveshafts and then transfer case. Cut the exhaust off (try to get the passenger side as high as possible so it clears the motor mount coming out). Disconnected the remaining lines to power steering and unbolted the motor mounts. Dropped the transmission crossmember and it was ready to come out. There is no good way to grab it. I ended up with straps around the exhaust manifolds. Glad it didn’t have to go high. After that it snakes out and there you go.

I had already pulled the old 5.0 so then I started changing things left over from the Cougar 5.0 to the Explorer 5.0. Bought HiPo exhaust manifolds that I am told are required to run GT40P heads so I pulled the Explorer manifolds and installed them. Put new spark plugs and wires on while I was there. You can use earlier style lift loops on the exhaust manifolds (mine came from the ’88 Cougar) when you put it back. Pulled the AWD transmission and replaced it with the 2WD one (with new front seal “while it was out”). I should have done the oil pan while the transmission was off, but I didn’t. Pulled the oil pan and figured out the dipstick. You have to keep the Explorer timing cover and unique accessories to stay distributorless. Drilled a hole on the LH side of the timing cover and put a flexible dipstick in the only place it fits. There is not “meat” here on the right to drill for a dipstick like the ‘80’s style cover has. I had to get creative. I ended up JB Welding the bottom of the dipstick tube to the cover and had to cut notches into the p/s bracket for the tube to get to the top. I bought a generic flex dipstick, get the longest one you can so you can access it. After that, swapped a new oil pump and pickup and installed the front sump pan. The FelPro 1-piece gasket with easy-ups worked well. So 2000 5.0 Explorer style oil pan and exhaust gaskets worked fine with the early pan and HiPo manifolds. Used stock 289 Motor mounts and AOD conversion transmission crossmember and mounts that I already had. Used an early Mustang II floor shifter and shift rod (that’s what I had), and the Explorer shift tab. Had to heat and bend the rod to make it fit. Took the ball off the Explorer shift tab and drilled it out to use the press in bushing. The transmission connector cannot stay with the stock bracket, but it will go in on top without “dimpling” the floor or changing wire lengths. I have a Borgeson power steering box (no issue with HiPo manifolds and automatic) so the return line hooks right up. On the pressure line, I have an Isuzu Trooper line at the box spliced with a JIC fitting to the Explorer hose from the pump. I had the Cougar 5.0/AOD in with a 49” (’88 Cougar) driveshaft. It was tight on clearance, but kind of worked. The 4R70W appears to be an inch longer so I seem to need a 47” or 47.5” shaft. Looking at ‘90s std cab automatic Rangers that are supposed to have 47.5”. That is the mechanical side of the swap. With that, the engine is in the car.

On the electrical side, I am using the engine/ transmission harness from the Explorer with only 2 changes. 1-removed RH rear O2 sensor wiring to the transmission plug. 2-used LH rear O2 sensor wiring to get VSS up to the PCM. I am adding an old-school Ford VSS generator and keeping the cable speedometer. This only applies to the ’98 up transmissions if you want cruise (no VSS in transmission, in these VSS is generated in the rear axle and passes through the ABS module to get to the cruise control). Garry has YouTube videos on modifying these harness if you really want to streamline it. I elected to leave the C115 connector alone and take the mating front harness out of the Explorer and use it- you do have to pull the dash to remove the dash harness, but it is not hard. It has a nice fuse/relay box that is way overkill for a Mustang. I am using it and an aftermarket harness for the Mustang to keep the electrical loads controlled. The factory Service manuals for 2000 (and 1996 supplement) have nothing on the 5.0 so don’t bother with them. The 2000 Explorer/Mountaineer wiring diagram manual is good. I did a lot of wire tracing and thinking to get it where I can use the Explorer front harness mated to the aftermarket dash and rear harness. I left the front O2 connections in the stock locations. The RH side could be longer and access better, but it will work as-is.

Fuel system. I have a Tanks Inc. 22 gal 69-70 style fuel tank with Walbro pump. I am using canister purge and a 2000 Mustang charcoal canister mounted where the battery was. The ’99 up 5.0 is “returnless fuel”. There is a regulator in the tank that returns fuel inside the tank (contrary to rumor it does not vary voltage to the pump). There is enough height on the pickup to add it (but maybe not on a 16 gal tank, I don’t know) but not enough room to get it through the opening in the top of the tank. So I am using a 2000 Corvette fuel filter (Wix 33737) that has a regulator built in it and a return line to tank. Or you could just have an external regulator and normal filter. One additional advantage of the Corvette filter is that it is 5 micron where the stock Explorer filter is 10 micron.

The PCM either goes nearby the engine or you can extend the harness and put it inside. I elected to not extend it. I bought a 2001 Ford Escape PCM box from the pick-a-part (note: rear is held in under the cowl, not from inside the car). I cut a hole in the firewall and mounted it. I will have to patch up where the Cougar harness went in, the PCM box can’t go in the same place.

There is no room for the stock a/c compressor without major shock tower surgery. Again, you have to keep the Explorer accessories to stay distributorless. Everything else fits nicely in the Mustang engine bay. I got an oil filter adapter to use a FL1A filter because I was told the Explorer one wouldn’t work, but the non-oil-cooler Explorer filter housing puts the filter in a nice place so I left it. This Mountaineer had an a/c eliminator so I didn’t have to buy one. I have seen a routing with a shorter belt that would allow no eliminator. Investigating whether a 2000 Crown Vic a/c compressor with top fittings might fit the Explorer bracket correctly. If it does, it will require relocating the p/s reservoir.

The IAC valve is the tallest thing on the engine. I found CobraEngineering that offers an IAC mount where the EGR valve once was, but it is not exactly the right bolt spacing. If the IAC can’t be relocated, you will need a raised hood. I ended up with a Cobra Engineering IAC blockoff plate. Then I will put a threaded plate with a nipple where the EGR valve was. I will connect that to a BMW/Volvo/SAAB remote, PWM style, IAC valve (Bosch 0280140516). I believe that the Holley Sniper remote IAC valve would also work and already has a filter.

I will probably use an aluminum '69 Mustang BB Radiator. Looked long and hard at crossflow from '68 BB Galaxie or 5.0 Fox Mustang but there is a lot of fabricating to mount and they are wide. I have enough space to use the Explorer mechanical fan, but will likely use a 2-speed '95 Taurus fan or '90s Volvo fan with Volvo relay and BMW switch. Unfortunately the PCM cannot be made to control an electric fan.

I hope to have it running in a month or so. I will post another update then.
 
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MARKDTN

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Clarifications/updates from above and then recent progress:

The list of things turned off in the PCM should also have included rear O2 sensors.

I’m not totally convinced now that stock exhaust manifolds won’t work with the GT40P heads, but I did not try it. The HiPo manifolds look better and flow better so it’s probably for the best anyway. Nobody makes an H-pipe that will fit either style manifold and clear an AOD or 4R70W (much less have O2 sensor bungs) so you will have to have at least a custom H-pipe.

Driveshaft/4R70W: the Explorer flange is for a 1330 style U-joint while the Ranger, Late Mustangs, and Cougar use a 1310 U-joint. Originally, I used a conversion joint (Spicer S5-134X) at the rear to balance it out with the Cougar AOD driveshaft. A 4R70W does have 28 spline yoke like a C4, Toploader, or AOD BUT the OD of the yoke is bigger so you can’t use that style yoke without mods because it is loose in the tailhousing. That means without transmission changes, you have to use a 4R70W yoke which on the Ford side was not made with a 1310 u-joint, most seem to be 1330. A 4R70W 1310 yoke does exist in the aftermarket but is spendy. You could use another conversion joint to go back to the driveshaft, but that seemed like too much up and down-and I don’t have the right length driveshaft anyway. So much for cheap junkyard parts to make this work. Another possibility is put an AOD tailhousing on the 4R70W, but I already sold my AOD. Just be aware of the yoke difference in your plans. So I bought a 2005 Crown Vic Police aluminum driveshaft which has the right flange on the rear and right yoke on the front, I had it cut down and balanced. (not sure a steel Crown Vic one would work. Aluminum one is same diameter over the whole length. Steel one is smaller at front and rear and big in the middle. Maybe/maybe not enough small to shorten?) I ended up with 51.125” from rear axle flange to transmission yoke with the yoke all the way in. If you back off 1” you get 50.125” and if you subtract 1.75” for the flange you get 48.375” for a joint-to-joint on the driveshaft. I am not aware of anything Ford made in 1330 joint that is anywhere close to that length. Again, this was my car with that specific yoke. Yours may likely vary.

To be clear on my fuel tank, I am using a Tanks Inc 22 gal EFI tank for 69-70. So the Walbro pump is in the tank and it has a sump. The in-tank regulator on the ’99 up Explorer will not physically fit through the pump opening in the new tank, so the regulator has to be external OR find a fuel tank with a larger opening for the in-tank pump. I am running the fuel lines on the RH side and tucking the filter where the outer edge of the RH muffler would be (with a heat shield). I bought an Arvinode exhaust system so I don’t have to deal with an interference there since the chambered exhaust has no muffler.

As of this writing, I am very close to starting it. Battery cables are connected. Did away with the Mustang starter relay on the fender and am using the Explorer system. Fuel lines are connected. I came out of the tank and over the axle with 3/8 pressure and 5/16 return (left over from original swap-as was the 5/16 Vapor line to canister). The filter is on the passenger side in the muffler dimple. Then it runs 3/8 to almost the transmission crossmember where it goes to 5/16 with a short section of plastic line and quick connects. Then through where the crossmember attaches and up the firewall to right under the heater hoses. Each line has a couple cushion clamps holding it. Then I used the stock Explorer 5/16 line/hose that originally went to the filter routed across the firewall and connected to the line coming from the new filter. I have a Mastercool flare tool and it is awesome for making fuel lines and brake lines. I highly recommend it for this type of custom work. The Mastercool tool also does a nice job pushing quick connects into the plastic line as well if you are careful and patient.

All important wiring is complete (I still need to wire cruise, o/d off, and a few other new wires that were not in the Cougar 5.0 harness swap). I am about to order a radiator. Going to get a ’69 Mustang BB (24”) aluminum. I still don’t have the fan I want. I want a 90-95 2-speed Taurus fan, but our pick-a-part hasn’t had any of that body style in a while (let alone a Lincoln Mk 8). Also scarce on V6 Contour/Cougar dual fans and ‘90s Volvos. I have the BMW temp switch in an upper radiator hose splice and Volvo relay for a 2-speed conversion which I think is best, but I may have to go single speed fan just due to availability. I have a ’04 Lincoln LS single speed fan which really blows some air. It is close to the right size. It is unique in that it already has a relay built in. It has a constant hot and ground, an ignition switched wire, and a ground trigger wire so all you would need is a coolant temp switch to make it work (still wish the PCM did that but it doesn’t). But I really want a 2-speed. I can buy a Dorman one for a Taurus on Ebay for like $60. Just don't know if I trust it to last like OEM, but a motor for the LS Lincoln one is very spendy.

As a side note, I found that the Explorer heater hoses work nice with the Mustang firewall holes. I used two of the Gates 18933 hoses. Bottom one used as-is. Top one shortened about 2”. Am told that Gates 21736 upper and 20702 lower radiator hoses will work, but that remains to be seen.

No room for the Explorer air box so I bought a cone filter and MAF adapter. The filter can go where the battery used to be.

Lots of family and other stuff going on right now, but hopefully have it running and to exhaust shop in another 3-4 weeks.
 

MARKDTN

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Took the day off Friday to go to a tractor show. Sold some scrap metal on Friday morning. On the way back I went to the pick a part. They had an '00 Cougar with the dual fan I wanted so I bought it. Now I have 2-speed fans, Volvo relay, BMW switch, and adapter for the upper radiator hose. That fan is a perfect fit dimensionally for a 16x24" core radiator. Ordered a radiator for a '67 BB.

Had a couple hours Sunday afternoon that I wasn't expecting to have. Reworked the fan wiring harness and ordered a big relay for the fan so it won't run with the ignition off. Hooked up the battery and did an electrical check-all was good. Primed the fuel system and no leaks. Check. Plugged in the PCM and hit the key. It fired right up for a second. Need to fix the vacuum leaks and open holes. Need to make a plate for the new IAC valve. Need to mount the MAF sensor and air filter. Need to plumb the canister purge solenoid. But I have heard the engine run in the car so that is encouraging.

Probably can't do anything else for at least a week, but I am moving forward. I will have the radiator then and can put it all together when I have time next.
 

MARKDTN

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Had a little time so I wired in a fan relay and that is ready now. The fenders are off the car as is the radiator support (original was damaged and it made getting the engine in a bit easier). I modified the radiator support for the new wider radiator. Going later today to get some hardware to mount the radiator, fan, and get transmission cooler line fittings. As I have reviewed things over the last week, I decided to remove the EGR elbow and just put the throttle body on the plenum. This complicates the intake piping, but it rotates the throttle body 90 degrees which allows me to use a stock IAC valve and tuck the throttle cable out of the way. The cable bracket can be modified by cutting off the extra support tab and cutting and bending so it uses 2 points of contact with the throttle body bolts. So I did that. I fixed a few points of vacuum leak and was ready to start it again. Hit the key and it fired right up and idled. I didn't run it long (10-15 seconds) since it has no water, but this weekend I am going to panel bond the radiator support on and install the radiator. Then it can run long enough to check out power steering and transmission levels. I don't seem to have any gauges working except the voltmeter so I need to diagnose that. Bleed brakes and some other knick-knacks and it should be ready to go to the exhaust shop.
 
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MARKDTN

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So I am almost there. I panel bonded the core support in on Thursday. Then on Saturday I hit it in a few spots with the welder just to be sure it would stay. I mounted the fans to the radiator. I was mounting the radiator to the support when I hit a fin and now have a tiny hole. I am having that fixed this week so I still couldn't run it long. While the radiator was in I figured out hoses. I ordered the Gates 21736 and 20702 from Rock Auto and at first glance without the radiator didn't look right. So I went to the parts store and got stock 2000 5.0 Explorer hoses. Once the radiator is in they are completely wrong. They might work with a side-tank radiator but even then not sure-especially the top hose. So I went back to 21736 and 20702. 21736 does work on top but I was glad I had the fan sensor in an extension because without it the hose would be tight. The bottom is one of those domino-effect things. Because I kept the Explorer oil filter sticking forward (by the way, you can't rotate it, I tried), the lower hose has to account for it. Also the Explorer pump is 1 3/4" outlet. So long story short, a 20702 works at the pump end if put on backward and then I bought a 20608 hose for the 1 3/4" elbow to go at the radiator. Cut the 1 1/2" elbow off the 20702 and spliced them together. Now there is room to remove the oil filter. If the oil filter was stock, you could use it in the normal orientation and splice the 1 3/4 in at the pump (or use it backwards as-is if your radiator lower is 1 1/2 instead of 1 3/4). I cleaned up tools and wiring. I figured out shock tower bracing. Ordered parts for that and exhaust hangers. Fired the car up for a few seconds and tested power steering. It works. Waited a while and tested the transmission. It works. So once I get the radiator back, I can install it and put water in it. Then I can diagnose why most of the gauges are not working. Still need to bleed the brakes. Once the exhaust hangers come in, I can put the Arvinode back half exhaust kit in and I can take it to the exhaust shop to make the front H-pipe. I need to go to the pick-a-part and look for air inlet pipes. I think mid-90s 4.0 Ranger will work. The Explorer pipe is a few inches short for my taste and a bit too fat to go past the shock tower and alternator cleanly. Probably would work in a '67 up, but not an early car. Once it runs, I can decide if I need to do a Shelby drop or cut a coil on the front springs. It sat high in the front when I rolled it out of the garage with the engine in it last. Then I can put the front sheetmetal on, verify hood clearance (fingers crossed), and will be pretty much done except for carpet which I am saving for last.
 

wicked93gs

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Why panel bond in a radiator support? I was under the impression the stock radiator support is easily modified for the 67+ radiator. As far as air inlet pipes go...why not just make your own? You could always just couple(or weld) some mandrel bent aluminum together....or if you are wanting to keep it composite because of temp concerns, there are ways to make your own fiberglass/carbon fiber tubing using mandrel bends as a plug.
 

MARKDTN

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I hate the process of all the spot welding is why I panel bonded it. I spotted it in a few places "just because", but the panel bond should be plenty strong. Yes, it is easily modified and it was out of the car which made it even easier. The original support was damaged in the wreck before I got the car and I cut it out and replaced the RH front apron. I left the support out all this time because it makes engine swaps-especially with o/d automatics- and working on the front of the engine easier.

I could make my own air intake tube from PVC sewer pipe, but if I can find something stock it saves me time. I have a Tuned Port 350 conversion in a '83 Chevy pickup that I made my own PVC air intake tube and it has held up fine for almost 20 years now. Part of the issue is that the space between the oil fill and the shock tower is tight. The Ranger inlet appears to have a square section that may go through that area better. I think this is a 64-66 issue and that the 67 up would have enough room.

Dual exhaust hanger kits are on a nationwide backorder. None of the suppliers have any in stock and don't know when they will have them. I think they all must use the same supplier. Guess I will let the exhaust shop use what they have. Stock hangers are not correct for Arvinode exhaust anyway, but for the price difference I was going to make it work.
 

MARKDTN

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52
Chattanooga, TN
Latest update. Saturday I was determined that I would be able to drive the car by the end of the day. I installed the radiator and fans. Added a transmission oil cooler from a similar Explorer. Fabricated an air intake tube (side note: could not find anything at the junkyard that I could use, 3" throttle body is uncommon, most seem to be in the 2"-2 1/2" range. 2000ish Crown Vic is very close to working, it is 3" on each end and long enough, but has a bend in a place that won't work. Found a 3" tight elbow-needed to clear the shock tower braces-on a '89ish 5.0 Grand Marquis. Made the rest from 3" sewer pipe and a 45 elbow. Also, if I hadn't already bought a cone filter and mass air adapter, I might have considered a 2005ish Mustang round filter I saw). Did a once over on the bottom side of the car and made sure everything was tight. Added some of the old H-pipe so the exhaust was past the manifolds and oxygen sensors could be installed. Tied up wiring. Bled brakes. Put the tires back on. Chased dash cluster issues (loose wire). Basically completed a bunch of little things I needed to finish. So I started adding water to the radiator in preparation for starting it. About 2/3 of a gallon in and water is coming out on the floor in the area of the timing cover. Not good. In the 3rd paragraph of post 11 where it talks about putting the dipstick in the cover, I did not mention that there is a boss that is not used on the side of the timing cover that is in the way of the dipstick tube location I had to use. I cut it off with a grinder. That part was fine, but what I did not notice was that I gouged the bottom of the timing cover that is the drivers side water tube from block to water pump a lot deeper than I thought. So now I have a slot/hole in the cover. For a few seconds I considered JB welding the hole, but the last thing I need is to be half way across the country and have that let go. So I pulled the timing cover and am having it welded back properly. And "while I am there" I am staring at the timing chain with 175K miles so I may as well replace it while I am looking at it. And I can replace the bolt that always breaks off when you pull a water pump on a SB Ford. Parts are on order. We are having company this weekend so I likely will not get to put it back together for 2 weeks. Then exhaust. Then decide if I need to Shelby drop the front end or leave it. Then front sheetmetal. Then alignment and new tires. Then interior. And I will be done. Drive. Of course there are always things that can go wrong in that sequence, but I feel like I am very close now.
 
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