Attempted To Pull Codes And Nothing Happened.

Discussion in '1979 - 1995 (Fox, SN95.0, & 2.3L) -General/Talk-' started by foxbodymike87, May 6, 2013.


  1. foxbodymike87

    foxbodymike87 Active Member

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    i put the jumper wire to the 2nd pin on connector and to the solo wire. then the test light from positive terminal to 2nd connector on the bottom. then i turn the key on and the test light stays lit. does not flash or anything. what am i doing wrong?
     
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  2. James.Little

    James.Little Member

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    If you have a five speed, hold down the clutch. If you have an automatic, make sure it is in neutral.
     
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  3. foxbodymike87

    foxbodymike87 Active Member

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    I got 81,82,85,86...i do not have smog or charcoal canister
     
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  4. James.Little

    James.Little Member

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    81 - Secondary Air Diverter Circuit Failure (O)
    82 - Secondary Air Bypass Circuit Failure (O)
    85 - CANP Circuit Failure (O)
    86 - Adaptive fuel limit reached (CM), 3 – 4 Shift solenoid circuit failure (O)
    [Source: http://dfwmustangs.net/forums/showthread.php?t=7908]
     
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  5. foxbodymike87

    foxbodymike87 Active Member

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    What do 85 and 86 mean?
     
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  6. foxbodymike87

    foxbodymike87 Active Member

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    also got 83 84 95...my egr is not hooked up...car is also mass air converted
     
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  7. jrichker

    jrichker StangNet's favorite TOOL SN Certified Technician Founding Member

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    Code 81 – Secondary Air Injection Diverter Solenoid failure AM2. The solenoid valve located on the back side of the passenger side wheel well is not functional. Possible bad wiring, bad connections, missing or defective solenoid valve. Check the solenoid valve for +12 volts at the Red wire and look for the Lt Green/Black wire to switch from +12 volts to 1 volt or less. The computer controls the valve by providing a ground path on the LT Green/Black wire for the solenoid valve.

    With the with the ignition on, look for 12 volts on the red wire on the solenoid connector. No 12 volts and you have wiring problems.

    With the engine running, stick a safety pin in the LT Green/Black wire for the solenoid valve & ground it. That should turn the solenoid on and cause air to flow out the port that goes to the pipe connected to the cats. If it doesn't, the valve is bad. If it does cause the airflow to switch, the computer or wiring going to the computer is not signaling the solenoid valve to open.

    Putting the computer into self test mode will cause the solenoid valve to toggle. If you listen carefully, you may hear it change states.

    Code 82 – Secondary Air Injection Diverter Solenoid failure AM1. Possible bad wiring, bad connections, missing or defective solenoid valve. Check the solenoid valve for +12 volts at the Red wire and look for the Red/White wire to switch from +12 volts to 1 volt or less. The computer controls the valve by providing a ground path on the Red/White wire for the solenoid valve

    With the engine running, stick a safety pin in the Red/White wire for the solenoid valve & ground it. That should turn the solenoid on and cause air to flow out the port that goes to the pipe connected to the heads. If it doesn't, the valve is bad. If it does cause the airflow to switch, the computer or wiring going to the computer is not signaling the solenoid valve to open.

    Both 81 & 82 codes usually mean that some uneducated person removed the solenoid control valves for the Thermactor Air system in an attempt to make the car faster. It doesn't work that way: no working control valves can cause the cat converters to choke and clog. If you do not have cat converters on the car, you can ignore the 81 & 82 codes.

    Code 84 EGR Vacuum Regulator failure – Broken vacuum lines, no +12 volts, regulator coil open circuit. The EVR regulates vacuum to the EGR valve to maintain the correct amount of vacuum. The solenoid coil should measure 20-70 Ohms resistance. The regulator has a vacuum feed on the bottom which draws from the intake manifold. The other vacuum line is regulated vacuum going to the EGR valve. One side of the EVR electrical circuit is +12 volts anytime the ignition switch is in the run position. The other side of the electrical circuit is the ground path and is controlled by the computer. The computer switches the ground on and off to control the regulator solenoid.

    Code 85 - CANP solenoid - The Carbon Canister solenoid is inoperative or missing. Check vacuum lines for leaks and cracks. Check electrical wiring for loose connections, damaged wiring and insulation. Check solenoid valve operation by grounding the gray/yellow wire to the solenoid and blowing through it.
    The computer provides the ground for the solenoid. The red wire to the solenoid is always energized any time the ignition switch is in the run position.

    Charcoal canister plumbing - one 3/8" tube from the bottom of the upper manifold to the rubber hose. Rubber hose connects to one side of the canister solenoid valve. Other side of the solenoid valve connects to one side of the canister. The other side of the canister connects to a rubber hose that connects to a line that goes all the way back to the gas tank. There is an electrical connector coming from the passenger side injector harness near #1 injector that plugs into the canister solenoid valve. It's purpose is to vent the gas tank. The solenoid valve opens at cruse to provide some extra fuel. The canister is normally mounted on the passenger side frame rail near the smog pump pulley.

    [​IMG]

    It does not weigh but a pound or so and helps richen up the cruse mixture. It draws no HP & keeps the car from smelling like gasoline in a closed garage. So with all these good things and no bad ones, why not hook it up & use it?


    The purge valve solenoid connector is a dangling wire that is near the ECT sensor and oil filler on the passenger side rocker cover. The actual solenoid valve is down next to the carbon canister. There is about 12"-16" of wire that runs parallel to the canister vent hose that comes off the bottom side of the upper intake manifold. That hose connects one port of the solenoid valve; the other port connects to the carbon canister.

    The purge valve solenoid should be available at your local auto parts store.

    Purge valve solenoid:
    [​IMG]


    The carbon canister is normally mounted on the passenger side frame rail near the smog pump pulley.
    Carbon Canister:
    [​IMG]


    Code 95 Key On, Engine not Running - the following test path is for 86-90 model Mustangs.

    The 95 code is because at one time or another, the fuel pump relay hiccupped and didn't provide power the pump when the computer told it to run. Sometimes this is a one time thing, other times it is a no run or runs poorly condition.

    [​IMG]

    Using the diagram, check the red/black wire from the fuel pump relay: you should see 12 volts or so. If not, check the inertia switch: on a hatch it is on the driver’s side by the taillight. Look for a black rubber plug that pops out: if you don't find it, then loosen up the plastic trim. Check for voltage on both sides of the switch. If there is voltage on both sides, then check the Pink/black wire on the fuel pump relay: it is the power feed to the fuel pump. No voltage there, check the Orange/Lt blue wire, it is the power feed to the fuel pump relay & has a fuse link in it. If there is good voltage there & at the Pink/black wire, swap the relay.

    Some Mass Air conversions neglect to run the extra fuel pump wire, and they always have a 95 code. See http://www.stangnet.com/tech/maf/massairconversion.html for more information on the Mass Air wiring conversion.

    See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) & Stang&2Birds (website host) for help on 88-95 wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/ Everyone should bookmark this site.

    Ignition switch wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/IgnitionSwitchWiring.gif

    Fuel, alternator, A/C and ignition wiring
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/fuel-alt-links-ign-ac.gif

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 88-91 Mass Air Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/88-91_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

    Complete computer, actuator & sensor wiring diagram for 91-93 Mass Air Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/91-93_5.0_EEC_Wiring_Diagram.gif

    Vacuum diagram 89-93 Mustangs
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/mustangFoxFordVacuumDiagram.jpg

    HVAC vacuum diagram
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/Mustang_AC_heat_vacuum_controls.gif

    TFI module differences & pinout
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/TFI_5.0_comparison.gif

    Fuse box layout
    http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/images/MustangFuseBox.gif

    Code 86 Adaptive fuel limit reached. The computer cannot adjust the fuel injector pulse duration enough to get the air/fuel mixture to achieve the perfect 14.7: 1 air/ fuel ratio at cruse. This may be an extreme rich or extreme lean condition. It can be due to a MAF/injector or MAF/computer mismatch, defective MAF (this will set code 66), fuel pressure set too high or bad injector(s), or a failed MAP/BARO sensor (this will set code 22).

    Included in this problem are engines converted to MAF and the MAP/Baro sensor is still connected to the intake manifold: this will cause an extreme rich condition. MAF engines require you to let the MAP/Baro sensor vent to the open air.

    Diagnosing the problem:
    Check the O2 sensors – look for code 41/91 when you dump the codes.

    Check the O2 sensor output at the computer: If the O2 sensors aren’t bad, this will help you determine if you have an extreme rich or extreme lean condition.
    An O2 sensor reading that is always high and never switches to a low reading is an extreme rich condition.
    An O2 sensor reading that is always low and never switches to a high reading is an extreme lean condition.

    Testing the O2 sensors 87-93 5.0 Mustangs
    Measuring the O2 sensor voltage at the computer will give you a good idea of how well they are working. You'll have to pull the passenger side kick panel off to gain access to the computer connector. Remove the plastic wiring cover to get to the back side of the wiring. Use a safety pin or paper clip to probe the connections from the rear.

    Disconnect the O2 sensor from the harness and use the body side O2 sensor harness as the starting point for testing. Do not measure the resistance of the O2 sensor , you may damage it. Resistance measurements for the O2 sensor harness are made with one meter lead on the O2 sensor harness and the other meter lead on the computer wire or pin for the O2 sensor.

    Backside view of the computer wiring connector:
    [​IMG]

    87-90 5.0 Mustangs:
    Computer pin 43 Dark blue/Lt green – LH O2 sensor
    Computer pin 29 Dark Green/Pink – RH O2 sensor
    The computer pins are 29 (LH O2 with a dark green/pink wire) and 43 (RH O2 with a dark blue/pink wire). Use the ground next to the computer to ground the voltmeter. The O2 sensor voltage should switch between .2-.9 volt at idle.

    91-93 5.0 Mustangs:
    Computer pin 43 Red/Black – LH O2 sensor
    Computer pin 29 Gray/Lt blue – RH O2 sensor
    The computer pins are 29 (LH O2 with a Gray/Lt blue wire) and 43 (RH O2 with a Red/Black wire). Use the ground next to the computer to ground the voltmeter. The O2 sensor voltage should switch between .2-.9 volt at idle.


    Testing the O2 sensors 94-95 5.0 Mustangs
    Measuring the O2 sensor voltage at the computer will give you a good idea of how well they are working. You'll have to pull the passenger side kick panel off to gain access to the computer connector. Remove the plastic wiring cover to get to the back side of the wiring. Use a safety pin or paper clip to probe the connections from the rear. The computer pins are 29 (LH O2 with a red/black wire) and 27 (RH O2 with a gray/lt blue wire). Use pin 32 (gray/red wire) to ground the voltmeter. The O2 sensor voltage should switch between .2-.9 volt at idle.

    Fuel pressure OK, the injectors are not firing, OR one or more injectors stuck
    open


    Do a cylinder balance test: Warm the car's engine up to normal operating
    temperature. With the Engine Off, Key OFF, use a jumper wire or paper clip to
    put the computer into test mode. Start the engine and let it go through the
    normal diagnostic tests, then quickly press the throttle to the floor. The
    engine RPM should exceed 2500 RPM's for a brief second. The engine will shut
    off power to each injector, one at a time. When it has sequenced through all
    8 injectors, it will flash 9 or the number of the failing cylinder such as 22 for
    cylinder #2. Quickly pressing the throttle again up to 2500 RPM’s will cause
    the test to re-run with smaller qualifying figures. Do it a third time, and if the
    same cylinder shows up, the cylinder is weak and isn’t putting out power like
    it should. See the Chilton’s Shop manual for the complete test procedure

    The red wire on each injector is powered up whenever the ignition switch is
    in the Run position. The computer provides a ground to complete the circuit
    and fire the injector. The injector must have a ground to squirt fuel on
    command. A short to ground in the injector return wiring can cause one or
    more injectors to be continually open or triggered
    A.) A Noid light available from Autozone, is one way to test
    the injector wiring. If the light stays on constantly, either the wiring has a
    short to ground or the computer has failed

    B.) I like to use an old injector with compressed air applied to the
    injector where the fuel rail would normally connect. I hook the whole thing
    up, apply compressed air to the injector and stick it in a paper cup of soapy
    water. When the engine cranks with the ignition switch on, if the injector
    fires, it makes bubbles An injector stuck open will release a continual stream
    of bubbles. Cheap if you have the stuff laying around, and works good too.
    The same trick works great to find leaking injectors too.​
    The wiring for the injectors may have some bare spots in it causing the
    injector to computer control wire to ground out. This would cause the
    injector to remain on anytime the key was in the Run position. Remove the
    injector wiring connectors from the injector. Note that each injector has one
    red wire for power and a non red wire (wire some color other than red) for
    computer controlled ground. With the key off, disconnect the computer
    connector from the computer. Use an Ohmmeter between the non red wire
    and ground. You should see more than 100000 (100K) ohms resistance.


    See the following website for some help from Tmoss (diagram designer) &
    Stang&2Birds (website host) for help wiring http://www.veryuseful.com/mustang/tech/engine/

    Diagram courtesy of Tmoss & Stang&2birds

    [​IMG]

    Using the above diagram, check the resistance between the injector and the
    computer. Clean and check the 10 pin connectors since they are a potential
    trouble source. Any resistance greater than 1.5 ohm between the injector to
    computer wire and the matching pin on the computer connector is a problem.


    See the graphic for the 10 pin connector circuit layout.
    [​IMG]
    The injector power pin is the VPWR pin in the black 10 pin connector.




    Dump the codes: Codes may be present even if the Check Engine Light (CEL) isn't on. You will need to do this to run the cylinder balance test.

    Dumping the computer diagnostic codes on 86-95 Mustangs

    Revised 26-July-2011. Added need to make sure the clutch is pressed when dumping codes.

    Codes may be present even if the check engine light hasn’t come on, so be sure to check for them.

    Here's the way to dump the computer codes with only a jumper wire or paper clip and the check engine light, or test light or voltmeter. I’ve used it for years, and it works great. You watch the flashing test lamp or Check Engine Light and count the flashes.

    Post the codes you get and I will post 86-93 model 5.0 Mustang specific code definitions and fixes. I do not have a complete listing for 94-95 model 5.0 Mustangs at this time.

    Be sure to turn off the A/C, and put the transmission in neutral when dumping the codes. On a manual transmission car, be sure to press the clutch to the floor.
    Fail to do this and you will generate a code 67 and not be able to dump the Engine Running codes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If your car is an 86-88 stang, you'll have to use the test lamp or voltmeter method. There is no functional check engine light on the 86-88's except possibly the Cali Mass Air cars.

    [​IMG]

    The STI has a gray connector shell and a white/red wire. It comes from the same bundle of wires as the self test connector.

    89 through 95 cars have a working Check Engine light. Watch it instead of using a test lamp.

    [​IMG]

    The STI has a gray connector shell and a white/red wire. It comes from the same bundle of wires as the self test connector.


    WARNING!!! There is a single dark brown connector with a black/orange wire. It is the 12 volt power to the under the hood light. Do not jumper it to the computer test connector. If you do, you will damage the computer.

    What to expect:
    You should get a code 11 (two single flashes in succession). This says that the computer's internal workings are OK, and that the wiring to put the computer into diagnostic mode is good. No code 11 and you have some wiring problems. This is crucial: the same wire that provides the ground to dump the codes provides signal ground for the TPS, EGR, ACT and Map/Baro sensors. If it fails, you will have poor performance, economy and driveablity problems

    Some codes have different answers if the engine is running from the answers that it has when the engine isn't running. It helps a lot to know if you had the engine running when you ran the test.

    Dumping the Engine Running codes: The procedure is the same, you start the engine with the test jumper in place. Be sure the A/C is off, and clutch (if present) is pressed to the floor, and the transmission is in neutral. You'll get an 11, then a 4 and the engine will speed up to do the EGR test. After the engine speed decreases back to idle, it will dump the engine running codes.

    Trouble codes are either 2 digit or 3 digit, there are no cars that use both 2 digit codes and 3 digit codes.

    Your 86-88 5.0 won't have a working Check Engine Light, so you'll need a test light.
    See AutoZone Part Number: 25886 , $10
    [​IMG]



    Alternate methods:
    For those who are intimidated by all the wires & connections, see Actron® for what a typical hand scanner looks like. Normal retail price is about $30 or so at AutoZone or Wal-Mart.

    Or for a nicer scanner see Equus - Digital Ford Code Reader (3145) – It has a 3 digit LCD display so that you don’t have to count flashes or beeps.. Cost is $30-$36.
     
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  8. foxbodymike87

    foxbodymike87 Active Member

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    ok, i dont have cats, egr, canister, or smog. so i can ignore all codes? i re-did the test and code 86 went away.
     
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