TwEECer Tuning Manual

Discussion in '1994 - 1995 Specific Tech' started by BlueOvalStangGT, Jan 24, 2006.


  1. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    Here is the full document I compiled with pictures or tables, etc.

    http://rapidshare.de/files/11399349/Tweecer_Tuning_Manual.doc.html
    ^ If someone can host that where you dont have to go through all the bull***** to download it, be my guess and PM Me and I will update it.

    And here is a copy minus the screenshots, for reference.

    *Tweecer Tuning Manual*
    info by: SmokinGT50, BuggaPimp5.0, OinkAODEOink, 93notch, Boss96
    websites: EECTuning.org, Stangnet.com, sctuner.net
    compiled by: on_ice/BlueOvalStangGT

    General Info:
    Here are a couple of basic guidelines to follow:
    1. refresh the screen before moving on. A lot of times the TwEECer will reject what you have entered. If you are modifying a scalar there is a refresh button on your screen, I suggest you use it after every entry. Fuel tables and some scalars will round your values down the the closest value it can accept. For example, if you put a 12.1 in the fuel table, once you refresh it will change to 12.014. I can't tell you how many times someone has complained that their car wouldn't run just to find out that one of the values in their MAF transfer had changed to a 0. Everything needs to be double checked before writing to the chip.
    2. Backup your tuning frequently, after a small mishap were I had to start all over, the file got corrupted somehow, I learned that it is very important to back up your TwEEC's. I save a new file for every couple changes, but I am a little anal too.
    3. Use the Tuning Notes in the "Input/Output" tab, you are going to forget some of the changes you have made.
    4. Compare different factory EEC calibrations, there has been a lot of success in using a modified version of the Cobra(J4J1) cal. There is a ton of differences between the Gt and the Cobra cal.'s.
    5. When installing the TwEECer software, always install the Borland database software first.
    6. Position 1 is full Counter Clockwise the one with the dot if you have one. Off is full clockwise
    7. Set your base timing by the distibutor back to 10*. All of the timing tables in CalEdit are based on 10* base timing and it is included in the values you see


    Getting Started:
    1. Once you have your TwEECer hooked up and all of the software properly installed. Your are ready to try your first tweak. Be sure to turn the car to the "ON" position, but not running, anytime you are trying to read or write to the twEECer while it is connected to the EEC. You desktop PC users don't need to worry about this, as I believe when the TwEECer is not connected to the EEC it is bus powered by the USB cable.
    2. Open CalEdit, go to the Input/Output tab, the TwEECer knob can be in any position, click read EEC, this should populate all of your scalars, functions and tables with your stock configuration. If you want to use a cal. other then your factory, you will have to download it from the TwEECer website, then using the Input File button, navigate to the .bin file. Make sure in the file type drop down menu you select Ford EEC binaries.
    3. I would make a small change, something immediately noticeable like the idle RPM or Fans, save the change by clicking on the write changes button.
    4. Now select one of your 4 available tuning positions on the dial selector and check write TwEECer. There are a couple of extra steps for datalogging, but I will get to that later.
    5. Now its time to verify that your TwEECer is working by selecting the position you just wrote to and starting your car. You can switch between 2 different tunes while the car is running. Go ahead give it a try, switch between the factory cal and the one you just wrote, and watch you idle go up and down. Now you are ready to try datalogging, if you bought the RT model.

    Datalogging:

    Note: This assumes that you have a working and installed TwEECer on your car and that you are using CalCon/CalEdit v1.20b or newer.

    1) Connect the USB cable from the TwEECer to your computer.
    2) Startup CalEdit.
    3) Click the tab labeled "Utilities" at the top
    4) The top right of the screen contains the various variables you may datalog (you may select up to 16). Select the items you would like to datalog.
    5) Click "Payload".
    6) Click the tab at the top labeled "Input / Output".
    7) Check the box labeled "Data Logging" which is right below the button called "Read EEC".
    8) Turn the key in the ignition to the ON position and wait 5 seconds (so windows can have time to load the USB driver to talk to the TwEECer).
    9) Click "Write TwEECer".

    * wait for CalEdit to write the binary and payload to the TwEECer *

    10) Close CalEdit and Startup CalCon (CalEdit cannot write to the TwEECer while CalCon is open).
    11) Click the tab at the top called "Dashboard" or "Digital" (doesn't matter which, just pick whichever display is preferable to you).
    12) Select the correct RT Method (pick from list under "Log to File" checkbox)
    13) Check the box labeled "Log to file" in the top right hand corner.
    14) Start the car.
    15) Click the button labeled "Start Logging".

    The gauges in the display should now spring to life showing you the various items you selected in your custom payload. If it does not, or very strange values show up, please make sure the connection with the J3 port on the EEC is clean, and that you followed the steps above correctly.
     
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  2. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    A Little Background on Dyno Tuning
    How is dyno tuning accomplished? This discussion will be centered around tuning vehicles with electronic fuel injection (EFI), where the system allows for adjustments to the engine control unit (ECU) through the use of computer software or hand held control modules. The process is very similar for carbureted vehicles with mechanical ignition timing, except fuel and ignition adjustment are made with screwdrivers and wrenches instead of computers.

    Dyno tuning begins with an overall inspection of the vehicle's integrity. The car must be mechanically solid, capable of withstanding the rigors of repeated loading by the chassis dynamometer. The most common problem identified is overheating due to inadequate cooling systems. It is virtually impossible to tune a vehicle that overheats.

    Getting Connected.... at a minimum, the following information must be measured and analyzed in order for us to tune your engine: Air to fuel ratio, fuel injector duty cycle, mass air sensor output voltage, ignition timing and fuel pressure. Similar to how a doctor uses an EKG to monitor your heart, this equipment enables us to monitor and record your engine's vital statistics during the tuning process and diagnose problems before engine damage results. The importance of these fundamental measurements cannot be overstated. Accordingly, the following outline contains a brief description of each sensor and an explanation of the importance of each measurement:

    1.) Air to fuel ratio - This property is derived from measuring the output of a wide band oxygen sensor. The sensor measures the amount of oxygen in the combustion products. The associated signal conditioning equipment is calibrated to translate exhaust gas oxygen concentration into an air to fuel ratio. The equipment is capable of measuring air to fuel ratios from 10.5/1 to 17.9/1. This measurement is invaluable during every stage of the tuning process. Improper air to fuel ratios are often associated with the following problems: poor idle quality, power loss, misfire, stumbling, hesitation, knock, high exhaust temperatures, backfire and poor mileage.

    NOTE - This equipment should not be confused with the oxygen sensors commonly found on production emission vehicles. The oxygen sensor used for emission control is narrow band, and is limited to measuring the state of exhaust gases in relation to stoichiometric, which corresponds to an air to fuel ratio of 14.7/1. Connected to the proper control equipment, and used with the appropriate control algorithm, the narrow band oxygen sensor can be used in an EFI system to help maintain air to fuel ratios near 14.7/1. However, for measurement applications, the narrow band oxygen sensor is unable to resolve air to fuel ratio with any meaningful accuracy.

    2.) Fuel injector duty cycle - Fuel injector duty cycle has a direct impact on air to fuel ratio. Improperly sized injectors are common for EFI systems. Oversized injectors cause poor idling, bad fuel mileage and sluggish low load throttle response. Undersized injectors go static under high load causing poor fuel vaporization and improper fuel distribution inside the cylinder which results in engine knock and power loss. Moreover, undersized injectors limit fuel delivery causing dangerously lean combustion mixtures under heavy loads.

    3.) Mass air sensor output voltage - The mass air sensor is part of the EFI system and is used as the primary means to measure engine load on mass air systems. In combination with the voltage to mass flow rate transfer function, this measurement is essential in determining where adjustments are made on the fuel and spark tables in the ECU. Also, this measurement enables us to verify the mass air sensor is properly sized. An oversized meter will give poor resolution during idle and low loads which causes idle surge and stumbling during normal driving. Undersized meters reach their measurement limit during heavy loading, and additional air that enters the engine is not compensated with additional fuel. This causes lean combustion mixtures where the engine is most susceptible to damage,...at high loads and high engine speeds.

    *NOTE - The term "sizing" used in the above discussion is in reference to the mass air sensor air flow calibration, not the physical dimensions of the meter. Two mass air meters of different physical dimensions, for instance 65mm and 80mm diameter meters, could have the same size air flow calibration, 0 kg-air/hr to 1500 kg-air/hr.

    4.) Ignition timing - Measuring ignition timing is essential during engine tuning. Even though the ECU is programmed for a particular ignition advance, the timing must be verified independently. In our test facility, we have witnessed instances where the ECU was programmed for 15 degrees of advance, but the actual engine timing drifted up to 18 degrees at high engine speed. Since performance engines are usually knock limited, identifying the 3 degree offset between programmed timing and actual engine timing was critical in maximizing the life of the 950 HP supercharged engine.

    Improperly set ignition timing can cause many unsuspecting problems, such as poor idle quality, power loss, stumbling, hesitation, engine knock, high exhaust temperatures and poor mileage. Over time, improperly set ignition timing will decrease the life of your engine. Naturally aspirated engines with moderate compression ratios are usually fairly forgiving as long as the timing is eventually set properly. Supercharged or nitrous applications are not, and an improperly setup ignition map will destroy your engine very quickly.

    5.) Fuel Pressure - Inadequate fuel pressure causes poor fuel vaporization and improper fuel distribution inside the cylinder which results in engine knock and power loss. This measurement is a good indication of the overall health of the fuel system, which is comprised of the fuel pump, fuel delivery line, fuel rail, fuel regulator and fuel return line. Pressure across the injectors must be held constant as pressure in the manifold changes. For supercharged cars, this means fuel pressure must increase pound per pound with increases in manifold pressure. For all engines, the fuel pressure should be vacuum compensated to lower fuel pressure as the manifold draws a vacuum. From our experience, the majority of fuel system problems are caused by inadequate fuel delivery line size, inadequate fuel pump size and poor quality fuel pressure regulators.

    For cars with superchargers or nitrous setups, we require additional sensors....

    Adjusting the idle and low load settings.... The first adjustment made to the system should be to align the base timing with the ECU. Since the spark ignition system does not have feedback, the distributor must be manually adjusted to bring the ECU into alignment. Some ECUs offer a means of doing this through the software, but either way, it needs to be verified and aligned manually.

    The next fundamental adjustment made to the system is base fuel pressure. With vacuum off the fuel regulator, the pressure should read at least 40 psig. Depending on the ECU, some expect the pressure to be near a certain value, such as 42.5 psig. These systems are usually original equipment manufacturer systems or aftermarket mass air systems that utilize an advanced algorithm to calculate fuel requirements based on the assumption that fuel pressure is set a predetermined value. For systems that need higher fuel pressure to extend the range of the injectors, it commonly accepted that increases up to 55 psi are acceptable without the threat of damaging the injector drivers or degrading injector motion performance.

    At this point, the acceleration enrichment needs to be adjusted just enough to ensure it is not exceeding rich or lean. Since this setting is usually a percentage of the base fuel map, fine tuning of this adjustment should be suspended until the base fuel map is setup.

    For vehicles that are idled or driven at low load for any appreciable length of time must be setup to operate properly at idle (no load) and low load before any wide open throttle (WOT) tuning is accomplished. The reason for this is an engine cannot operate properly at WOT if it is forced to recover from or stumble through improperly configured idle and low load settings. Fouled plugs, hesitation, stumbling, sluggishness and backfire are all clear evidence that the following must be adjusted:

    1.) Throttle position sensor - This sensor is effectively a potentiometer that supplies a variable voltage output relative to the position of the throttle plates. The use of this output from this sensor varies from one ECU to another, but generally speaking, most ECUs utilize this sensor to determine when the engine is idling and how much fuel to add during transient load conditions. On racing engines with little or no vacuum signal, this sensor is used in the Alpha-N mode, where throttle position is used as a measure of engine load instead of manifold vacuum. We have also seen this sensor used in a control algorithm to stabilize idle lope from camshaft overlap. Also, features such as idle spark control and closed loop fuel control use this sensor as indication to initiate or suspend operations.

    The throttle position sensor must be manually adjusted or zeroed through the ECU when the throttle plates are adjusted. Failure to do so will prevent the ECU from knowing when the car is at idle, and therefore cause poor idle and low load operation.

    2.) Throttle plate position - In combination with the idle air controller, the throttle plate position at idle has a direct impact on idle quality. If too much air passes the throttle plates, the engine will idle above the target idle engine speed. If too little air passes the throttle plates, the engine will pass excess air through the idle air controller to raise engine speed, and degrade the function of the idle air controller when the throttle plates are snapped shut from an open throttle position.

    3.) Idle air controller - The function of this device is to bypass air around the throttle plates to maintain a proper idle. For speed density cars, it is also used to prevent the engine from stalling when the throttle plates are snapped shut from an open throttle position. Another use for this controller is load compensation when the air conditioner is turned on or the transmission is put into drive. Many ECUs have tables that allow adjustment and fine tuning of these settings.

    4.) Idle and low load fuel - This is the amount of fuel delivered to the engine during idle conditions. Monitored via the real time viewing of the air to fuel ratio measurement, the amount of idle fuel required by the engine is dependent on various factors. Usually camshaft overlap has the most influence, where large amounts of overlap require slightly richer mixtures to dampen idle surge.

    5.) Idle and low load ignition timing - This setting has a direct impact on idle quality. Idle surge, hesitation and sluggish response can be caused by improperly adjusted idle ignition timing. This setting also influences the response of the engine to rapid changes from idle to partial or full load. Properly adjusted, the idle ignition timing will allow the engine speed to respond quickly to rapid changes in engine load that originate from idle.

    6.) Control functions - Depending upon the ECU, there are various idle and low load control features utilized to improve drivability, increase fuel mileage, and reduce exhaust emissions. Every ECU implements the control features differently, and some work better than others. The most common control features are idle spark control, closed loop fuel management and target idle speed.

    Even though this information has been presented in a form that may seem like a chronological list of steps,.... do not be fooled. This portion of the setup can be extremely challenging since almost every adjustment affects the operation of the others. Radical combinations have required us to make adjustments for several hours just to establish quality idle and low load conditions. Without the benefit of real time viewing of the measurements, it would be nearly impossible to setup these cars properly in any reasonable amount of time.

    Develop fuel and ignition curves for high load and WOT.... This portion of the tuning process begins by programming conservative fuel and ignition curves into the ECU based upon available information regarding the engine design and expected power output. By incrementally increasing the load on the engine, adjustments are made to the WOT curves based upon information gathered from viewing the real time measurements.

    Make logged WOT passes on dyno.... This differs from the last step in that information will be gathered during WOT passes on the chassis dynamometer for viewing and analysis after each run. During these runs the computer will log all available measurement information from the data acquisition system, as well as measure and record horsepower and torque. By analyzing this information, adjustments are made to the fuel and ignition curves until horsepower and torque are optimized for all engine speeds.

    Adjust medium load fuel and ignition maps.... At this point, the idle, load low and WOT portions of the fuel and ignition maps are optimized. All that remains is to tune the medium load fuel and ignition curves. This is accomplished by using the real time viewing function of our data acquisition system in conjunction with the chassis dynamometer controlled loading feature. This unique feature allows us to program portions of the fuel and ignition maps the engine will access during cruising, while climbing and descending hills, and during light to moderate acceleration.

    Adjust acceleration fuel.... Even though these curves probably have been under constant adjustment throughout the entire tuning process, the acceleration fuel curves needs to be adjusted one last time since they have probably been influenced by changes made to the base fuel map. This is accomplished easily and quickly on the chassis dynamometer.

    Setup auxiliary tables.... There are many ancillary tables and settings available in the ECU. Some of the more common adjustments are warm up enrichment, cranking fuel, air temp fuel correction and coolant temp fuel correction. Settings such as air temperature correction is fairly standard, whereas warm up enrichment is not, and requires time to develop (you only get one shot at adjusting this setting each day).
     
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  3. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    Getting Started

    Important Payloads:
    This varies from one setup to another, but these are the ones I always datalog, when trying to tune my car.
    Actual Load
    Air Charge Temperature (ACT)
    Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT), when it is fixed
    PW one or both
    KAMRF 1 & 2
    Lambda 1& 2
    MAK Voltage
    O2 sensors - both
    RPM
    Spark Advance
    Throttle Position Sensor
    VSS - MPH

    Basic Tuning:

    ZA0 (94-95) Basic setup

    SCALARS


    - Checksum Base Address = 0
    - Engine Displacement = Actual CID or leave alone if stock bottom end
    - Fuel Shut-off Deceleration Minimum ECT = 254 (disables)
    - Fuel Shutoff Shifting Minimum RPM = 2000 rpm
    - Fuel Shutoff Time to enable = 1
    - ISC Maximum Closed Throttle Idle = 100 rpm higher than the desired idle
    - ISC Maximum Drive RPM = depends on stall, cam, etc..
    - Idle in Gear = depends on stall, cam, etc..
    - Idle in Neutral = depends on stall, cam, etc..
    - Injector Slope Hi/Lo = actual injector size & actual injector size * 1.2
    - MAF Voltage Max/Min = 4.9999 & 0
    - Spark Retard for Knock Sensor = 15 or higher depening on if S/C, NOS, Turbo or NA
    - Fan Speeds = taylor to your needs
    - Manifold Volume = no valid data for positive affects
    - Max Spark Retard = 15 or higher depening on if S/C, NOS, Turbo or NA
    - open_loop_delay_hyst = 0
    - rev limits = taylor to your needs
    - spark adder global
    - spark_min_for_tip-in_retard = 15 or higher depening on if S/C, NOS, Turbo or NA
    - trans_min_TP_for_torque_control = 1020 A/D or 4.7 volts depending on display units
    - trans_torq_control_min_ECT = 254 (disable) seems to be operational for AODE only??

    More Basic Scalar changes:
    From Bugga:
    EGR Switch Type Scalar - Values

    0 = EGR is working and accessing its tables (DEFAULT)
    2 = EGR is disabled and bypassing its tables

    Thermactor
    Present Scalar Values - (A.K.A. Smog Pump/Air Pump)

    1 = Thermactor is present (DEFAULT)
    0 = Thermactor is disabled

    MAF Voltage Min = set to 0 or close to it, like .02
    MAF Voltage Max = set to 4.999 - this gives you a little more headroom for cars with a blower, they will easily max out a factory MAF meter.Probably doesn't help performance, but will help from triggering a CE code.

    Checksum Base Address = 0, this value must be inserted in the scalars or the EEC will trip a CE light once you have modified the EEC.

    How to remove the spark retard between shifts.
    Under the Scalars tab locate spark_min_for_tip-in_retard, the current value in this cell should be 5. You should change this to whatever value you feel comfortable with. I typically set it to whatever my total spark advance is. The blower and NOS guys should use some caution here as whatever value you input, the value you enter here will be your total spark advance for about 3/10th's of a second during any shift, even powershifting. I used to tell people to bypass this, just keep your foot to the floor, I have since datalogged powershifts where the retard occurs. I also used to tell poeple that this feature doesn't really do much. since it is only active for a short period of time, but after having to go back to stock programming for a week or two, I can honestly say that there is a seat of the pants difference when you shift. Wether or not this translates to quicker E.T's I can't say.

    Fans:
    There are 2 fan speeds to concern yourself with, low and high, so be sure to adjust them both. I guess you could run the high fan all the time, but with us already having to go to the dealer to keep our cars from catching fire from the fan, I don't suggest it.
    Since I have a 180* thermostat I generally I use these values;
    Tailor the fan settings to meet your needs.
    fan_high_speed_ECT1_on = 196
    fan_high_speed_ECT2_on = 200
    fan_high_speed_ECT_off = 190
    fan_low_speed_ECT_off = 182
    fan_low_speed_ECT_on = 188
    I haven't found it necessary to mess with any of the other fan settings

    4 Spark Tables
    spark_MBT_table - contains what the factory believes will make the most power. I set the values in this table to mimic my spark_altitude_table
    spark_altitude_table - at higher altitudes you need more spark advance, set this table to mimic your spark_base_table +2.
    spark_base_table - this is the table you will do most of your TwEECing
    spark_bdln_table - this table is the maximum allowed spark, regardless of what you enter in the other tables or multipliers. I set this table to all 55's the highest number that CalEdit will accept.

    Fuel tables:
    The values in the 2 load based tables are your target A/F ratio. Please note there are several modifiers to these tables, I will post a list on how they interact in the future.
    fuel_table_base_OL - This is the base fuel map used until the ECT stabilizes, the temperature in which the EEC stabilizes is adjustable through a scalar, stabilized_min_ECT. The lower the value in that scalar the sooner the EEC switches from the base table to the stabilized table.
    fuel_table_stabilized_OL - This is the table you will use to dial in your A/F, once your MAF transfer has been set.
    fuel_table_startup_OL - The time based values in this table are subtracted from the load based values in the other 2 tables to enrichen the mixture during cold startup. The higher the value in this table the richer the startup mixture is.
    MAF Transfer
    To keep this from being 100 pages long I am going to post a website that explains the MAF transfer very thoroughly

    http://www.superstang.com/maf.htm

    Injector Slopes
    Injector Slope High = Actual Injector Flow rating, taylor to meet your needs
    Injector Slope Low = This is generally set to 1.2 x High Slope. When using a Cobra cal. I tend to use the same slope for both, just because Ford did.

    open_loop_delay_hyst = 0 , this will allow the EEC to use the OL tables immediately when other criteria are met.

    Eliminating speed limiters

    (entering 16383 for all values effectivly turns off speed limiters)
    - Speed limit stage 1 off = 16383
    - Speed limit stage 1 on = 16383
    - Speed limit stage 2 off = 16383
    - Speed limit stage 2 on = 16383
    - Speed limit stage 3 = 16383

    Raising rev limits


    ( pretty obvious what this does, taylor to your needs, but remember to always set the "on" value higher then the "off" value)
    - Rev limit 0 off = 6300
    - Rev limit 0 on = 6400
    - Rev limit neutral 0 off = 6300
    - Rev limit neutral 0 on = 6400



    Longtube header settings


    ( if youre running longtubes, you might have ran into some problems with the O2's going cold, or taking a while to heat up to temp, these settings should keep everything happy)

    Tables
    Exhuast Pulse Delay

    R P M
    900 1300 1500
    .075 - 24 24 24 24
    L .06- 24 24 24 24
    O .05 - 20 20 20 20
    A .04 - 20 20 20 20
    D .03 - 20 20 20 20
    .02 - 20 20 20 20
    .01 - 20 20 20 20
    .005 - 20 20 20 20

    Couple definitions


    -Base Altitude Spark / Base Spark Table= A higher number increases ignition advance and a lower number decreases ignition advance. Base and Altitude spark tables are used based on barometric presure. Berometric presure above 26in/hg and the EEC will use the Base Spark Table while a barometric pressure below 26in/hg will use the Altitude Spark Table.

    -Global Spark Adder= This scaler function allows ignition timing to be adjusted. Increasing this value above 0 advances ignition timing by adding an aditional amount of timing to the spark table values. This is the same function as if you were to turn the distributor to advance the timing. These values can also be in the negitive to decrease timing.
    Example: Global spark adder= 2 , this would give you 12* base timing( if the distributors at 10*)
    Global spark adder= -2 , this would give you 8* base timing( distributor at 10* base)
    *All the EEC calculations are based off of 10* base timing*


    PIP / PIP Filter= Lower number gives a higher Rev limit.
    PIP= 6006250/maxRPM
    maxRPM= 6006250/PIP
    PIP= 961 max RPM= 6006250/961= 6250

    PIP is a sample rate frequency that limits the PCM program operating loop to a minimum rate. If the loop is sampled less then PIP times within one operating cycle( 2 crankshaft revolutions), the PCM limits RPM
    ( and thats how you come up with an effective rev limiter)


    -WOT Fuel Multiplier vs. RPM= This is an open loop fuel adder. Increase value over 1 to lower injector pulsewidth( less fuel) and decrease the number under 1 to increase the injector pulse width( more fuel) during open loop. Now, if these are untouched, you might find there are no RPM values on the X axis. Simply input the RPM values and corasponding fuel multiplier values below (Y axis) You can change the RPM value to add or remove fuel at any specific RPM.


    -Lambse= is what the EEC is targeting as air fuel ratio at anyone instant. If it is targeting 15.7 that means your running rich at that instant, so it tries to lean it out by targeting a value higher than 14.7.


    -Kamrf= is a long term correction. If it sees at a particular condition it is always running rich or lean it will start correcting it with Kamrf. It is more of a fuel multiplier than a target. If it is running rich at a certain condition the Kamrf will be less than one. (normal fuel times number less than 1 = less fuel).


    -Injector breakpoint= Injector breakpoint is the point at which the eec goes from the high to the low slope.
    The units are pound mass of fuel per injection. The injector breakpoint is an adder for the final fuel calculation to
    account for the non-linearity of the injectors, especially at small pulse-widths. It is a time-based adder, so it adds less as the PW gets larger. The breakpoint is used on the dominate slope at idle ( can be low slope or highslope) if your PW at idle is below 2MS, low slope is used, if your PW is above 2MS then the high slope is used.
    Low slope and injector breakpoint are open loop fuel adder's below a pulse width of 4MS. Low slope is used from 2MS and below and the Injector breakpoint is used from 2MS to approximatly 4MS.The Low slope isn't related to Injector breakpoint in any way.
     
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  4. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    --How to calculate Throttle presure(TP) from an AD count--

    ( typically in your settings that involve TP, TP is not displayed in volts.. Insted its displayed in an AD count, for example 100, 252, 332, 600, and WOT would be 1020( 5 volts). So to find out the TP voltage at that AD count, use the formula below) The AD # at idle is right around 200 (.98 volts) AD # around a 1500rpm cruise speed would be
    310.
    To convert the Throttle position AD count ( throttle position in AD counts) to throttle position volts divide the TP number by 1020 then multiply by 5 like this..

    Examples: 1020/1020*5 = 5v
    640/1020*5 = 3.137v



    --How does the Switch work? Which tune and im running on on which setting?--

    Full CounterClockwise

    A - tune 1 (Switch points near dimple on the case)
    B - tune 2
    C - tune 3
    D - tune 4
    E - Tweecer OFF (stock calibration)

    Full Clockwise

    --AODE Settings--


    :Scalers:
    trans tv adder 1-2 =16 ( Trans TV adder, is an adder to the trans presure)
    1-2 time=0 ( time delay between shifts)
    tv adder 2-3=16
    2-3 time=0
    tv adder 3-4=20
    time 3-4=1 (Lower this value to make the 3-4 shift quicker. Units i believe are in seconds)


    -- WOT shift points--

    :Scalers:

    take note, the actual 1-2 shift is going to be around 1000rpms off, from the setting you enter. The 2-3 shift is around 500rpms off from the set WOT shift point. So if u want the actual 1-2 WOT shift to happen at 5900 rpms, you would enter 4900rpms for the 1-2 WOT shift, and so on. This is dependant on which gears you are running.. SO the higher the gear( 410's-up) might require an even more drastic change.

    --Setting the tranny to shift firmer--

    :Functions:

    ( entering higher numbers on the Y axis (Y axis=MPH) at each throttle position(X axis=TP) will firm up the shift at that TP) ( these values might differ depending on which gears you have)

    trans tv press 1-2= x 0 0 0 0 0 52 400 600 1020
    y 5 5 5 5 5 10 17 46 56

    trans tv prss 2-3= x 0 0 0 28 52 252 400 600 1020
    y -5 -5 -5 -5 0 8 8 27 42




    -- How to get the tranny to shift later or sooner, under normal driving conditions (not wot)--

    :Functions:

    Trans Shift Schedules

    If youve installed diferent gears then factory, this setting will be thrown off, and might cuase your tranny to shift much too soon. When i went from 327's to 373's my tranny shifting way to soon, so i had to make changes here
    the Y axis represents MPH and the X axis represents TP( throttle presure) So to effectivly make your tranny shift later you would increase the MPH( Y axis) at whichever throttle position needed. If you just want to change the low speed driving shifts, then only increase the first 6 numbers for the MPH. I usually start increase 2 mph at a time, untill i have achieved the disired shift at that throttle postition.

    Tuning a supercharged car ~ BY BOSS96

    First off mechanical stuff. Make sure your engine is in good mechanical shape, especially no excessive blowby from worn rings. Cooling system, belts, etc.
    Use copper spark plugs, on a mod motor Autolite 764’s usually work very well gapped at .035 or a little lower. Get a 180 degree thermostat, also drill a small hole in it so water can get through it if it gets stuck. Also helps get rid of air pockets when you fill the system.
    No exhaust leaks especially around the headers/ex manifolds and the H/X pipe so the 02 sensors get accurate readings.
    Big enough fuel injectors, fuel pump, regulator and fuel lines/rails (if you plan on big HP). 42lb injectors usually are enough but if you plan to make more than around 425hp or so then get bigger injectors so you don’t buy them twice. 50’s or 60’s are a good idea. There is no problem getting the car to idle with 50-60lb injectors. Again, if you plan on going higher than 425hp or so then you may as well invest in bigger fuel rails, bigger fuel pump (I use the Aeromotive A1000 mounted under the bumper drawing through a pickup in place of the stock fuel pump). Get a 1-1 fuel regulator (again Aeromotive in my case) that raises fuel pressure 1lb per lb of boost. No. 8 feed and no. 6 return seem to be big enough on my system.
    For bigger hp numbers build the motor to suit, forged pistons/rods and definitely get head studs, not factory head bolts.
    Get a maf calibrated for that particular size injector so you don’t peg the meter from high airflow. My ProM “50lb” calibrated meter can read up to at least 2500kg/hr and on my particular combination it only hits 4.2 volts maximum leaving a lot of room to grow with that meter. Don’t get a “supercharged” curve, get a n/a calibration. Supercharged cal’s reduce the maximum airflow that the meter can read.


    More mechanical stuff

    I’ll use my car as an example since I’m most familiar with it. These are the mods it has.
    Vortech S trim, 2.87” blower pullie for approximately 15lbs boost at 6000 rpm. Ported PI heads with bigger int/ex valves. Crower valve springs, Crower cams with .580 lift and 238 dur@.050. MAC longtubes with matching 3” powerchamber H-pipe and Flowpath 3” “dumps”.
    Bullitt intake, MSD Dis4 HO ignition box, Accel wires and coil packs, 50lb injectors, ProM 77 cal’ed to match, UPR powerpipe, Vortech mini race bypass valve.
    I have the pcv valve still attached on the passenger side valve cover but on the drivers side instead of venting the crankcase to the inlet side of the vortech I instead have a hose running to a catch can with a breather for any blowby gases under boost. This keeps those gases from getting back into the motor. Presumably under boost the pcv valve will not allow gases to go past it as it works only under vacuum.
    With bigger boost values you need to upgrade the bypass valve like I have listed above. The MSD box will work best if you mount it in the passenger compartment, if it gets too hot from being under the hood it will sometimes shutdown. The MSD has a 2 step rev limiter which is useful at the track, you can set a launch rev limiter that will activate with a hand held switch, once you launch you let it go and the other rev limiter takes over from there.
    Get a fuel pressure gauge, I have the Autometer electric version, also get a boost gauge.
    The other mods are obvious if you intend to drag race, built rear end, better clutch/transmission (I have a TKO) steel bellhousing, etc.

    Tuning

    Again, this will be what I did to my particular car.
    Scalars.
    First off set your injector size, 50 high slope, 60 low slope. That’s a good starting point.
    Minimum inj pw, either set it to zero or reduce the stock value by the difference in injector size.
    Because of the cams I have, raise the idle speed in neutral to 750-800, 800 works best for me.
    Raise rev limiters to 7000 rpm on, 6800 off. Use the MSD to set your rev limiter to what you want as long as it is lower than the values in the scalars. The MSD had a “soft” rev limiter that is probably better than the factory style limiter.
    EGR type-set to 2. Disables EGR.
    High speed fan on-205, High speed fan off-200
    Low speed fan on 190, off 185. This will make the car run around 190 degrees ECT (coolant temp).
    MAF max a/d counts-set to 1024, the max allowed.
    MAF min counts-set very low, stock is 75 but since you have a meter calibrated for more air flow it will probably have a lower voltage output at idle than a stock meter so set it to around 10 or so to be safe.
    Max/min barometric pressure- set to 27 for both. Apparently blower cars can read/learn false baro press. values.
    OBD11 test sw-set this to 0 if you don’t want check engine lights.
    OL time delay hyst-set to 1
    OL time delay for rpm, or anything like that where there is a delay going into OL operation, set either to zero or a very low number. You want to get into OL fuel control quickly with a blower.
    Wot aircharge multiplier- according to some you should set it to 1.9, max allowable.
    Fuel adaptive sw Set to 1 for adaptive fuel control, allows fuel trims to be stored. Set to 0 to disable fuel trim storing. If you set it to 0 you will still be in CL but fuel trims will not be stored. On my car it seems to learn false fuel trims due to the longtube headers probably and if I want to run CL I set adaptive to 0 and thus have no problems with wrong fuel trims causing stalling, etc.
    Manifold volume-This will act like an accelerator pump, on my car I reduced the value until I got the tip in fuel I wanted. Some cars you will have to increase the number, others, like mine, you have to decrease it.
    Tables
    Fuel adaptive update rate—set to all positive numbers such as “3”. If you don’t, fuel trims applied to your inj pw’s will be applied to wot operation which could cause you to go lean/rich when you don’t want to. Setting the table to positive numbers will cause the eec to either learn at all load/rpm ranges or, if there are no fuel trims learned, to not apply any corrections to your wot values. A good thing if you tune your car when the eec has “learned fuel trims” memorized and then you disconnect the battery thus clearing “KAMRF” (fuel trims) at some later point. Your wot tuning will still be the same since no trims can be applied to the wot ranges.
    Fuel crank pw- You can experiment with this table if you think too much fuel is being used during start-up causing the car to be hard to start. A value of “1” is stock, lower numbers reduce the pw. I have reduced it a little, .8, and it seems to start fine but most can leave it alone.
    Fuel stab OL table-The stock settings are pretty rich up in the high load/rpm ranges, you can usually leave them alone except perhaps richening the a/f values in the middle rpm ranges if you think they are too lean. 12-1 a/f is a good value for a blower car under boost from about .9-1 load value between 3 and 6k rpm and up. Lower loads can be a little leaner gradually going towards 14.7 a/f as loads decrease. Again, the stock table is pretty good, use common sense.
    Fuel start up a/f ratio
    Fuel start up a/f ratio time-A/f during startup depending on temp and load. “Time” is a modifier to the start up values, the numbers in the table are subtracted from the start up table over a 60 second interval. A .2 in the table would be subtracted from whatever value was in the startup table, so if you see 14.3 a/f at 70 degrees ect then it would be 14.1 a/f during the time period shown in the “time” table.
    Hego delay-The delay time for ex pulses to reach the 02 sensors. How long the eec will wait until it acts upon the 02 sensor reading. Opinions vary on this table as some believe it is “learned” by the eec to get it optimum and therefore does not need to be changed, others say to increase the values to account for long tube headers. In my case it does not seem to matter much but on older eec’s (eec4) it seems to have a real effect.
    Injector timing-When the injector should open and spray fuel relative to camshaft events. With bigger cams it can make a big difference in idle quality and fuel mileage. I used the EECanalyzer to get some suggested values, easiest way to do it.
    Spark MBT, Altitude, BDLN, BASE –This gets complicated for many of us. This is my understanding on how it works. First thing to remember is the eec will choose the lowest values of spark advance from the various tables at any given time. Keep this in mind.MBT is the maximum spark advance for a stock engine that would produce the most power. However, depending on air charge temp (act) ,coolant temp (ect), and the current a/f ratio (CL or OL) the amount of spark that can actually be used will vary. Think of the values in this table as representing the best case under “perfect” conditions. A reference table if you will.
    Base spark table is similar to the MBT table, it shows the most spark you can actually use. For instance, lets say you command 35 degrees of spark at high load/rpm in the bdln table. The base table shows only 23 degrees timing plus perhaps another 4 degrees of timing added in from “spk base add a/f ratio” to arrive at 27 degrees total timing. The eec will see this value in the base table as being lower than the 35 degrees you have commanded in the bdln table and will use the base table value since it is lower. If you really want that 35 degree spark value you would have to raise the timing value in the base table as well any other spark tables that have timing values lower that what you want.
    Altitude spark is used in high alt. conditions, not too important to most of us.
    BDLN spark (borderline). These spark values are lower than the other tables and represent the most spark advance that can be used when the act is 70 degrees, coolant is 200 degrees and the a/f ratio is in CL (14.7-1). Because the a/f is relatively lean you can’t use as much spark advance and the table reflects that. If however you go OL and you’re a/f decreases to lets say 12-1 then a table called “spk bdln add a/f ratio” will add some timing to the values in the bdln table values since spark can be increased due to the richer a/f ratio. To make things simpler I set the values to zero in that table so there would be no extra timing added under boost.
    There is also two more spark modifiers to the bdln table values, spk bdln act retard and spkd bdln ect retard, which are spark retards for increases in act and ect values. If your act increases then spark is retarded more and more as temps increase, same for ect values. To understand how it works, look at the values in these two tables, at high loads/rpms they are effectively .1. Go to functions and look for spk retard for act/ect, you will see values going from negative to positive in units of 10. For example, at 140 degrees of act temp the retard value is negative 46. Multiply -46x .1 (found in the table previously) and you get 4.6 degrees of timing retard. 4.6 degrees would be subtracted from whatever timing was shown in the bdln spk table at the loads/rpms described. Same goes for ect retards.
    That leads to the next mod, move your iat sensor from the inlet side of the blower to the discharge side of the blower. The air coming out of the blower is much hotter that the inlet side and timing will be retarded accordingly. In fact, probably more timing will be taken out than you really want so you will want to datalog timing under boost and adjust either the retard tables or your bdln spark values to get the spark advance you want. Once you have done that then your timing will compensate for different weather conditions, hot days with hotter discharge temps will have less timing than cool days and your motor will be safer from detonation. Add a water/methanol kit to the car and if it is mounted before the iat sensor then timing will be advanced according to temp reduction from the water inj system and you will make more power. If the water kit fails you are still safe as timing will be retarded.
     
    #4
  5. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    Now, some people want to disable the MBT, Alt, BDLN tables so they only have one timing table to work with, BASE spk table. The way to do this is to set all the values in the above tables to 55 which is a much higher value than contained in the BASE table . Remember that the eec always chooses the lowest spark value at any given time so since the BASE table values are less than 55 only those spark values in the base table will be used. But don’t forget the spk adders for a/f ratio, there is a spk base add a/f ratio table just like the bdln a/f adder shown above and it does the same thing, adds spark according to a/f ratios. You can set them to zero to turn them off.
    But, doing it this way, all 55’s, will not let you use the bdln temp retards so it is not a great thing on a blower car with the iat relocated.
    Bottom line on a blower car is this, with the iat in the discharge side of the blower you are very likely to have low timing to begin with because of the high air temps plus the spark values in the bdln table are pretty low to begin with so your total spark won’t go near any of the values in the other tables. You will probably have to ADD spark in the bdln table to get where you need to be. Just datalog spark under boost to make sure.
    Functions
    TP for wot, fuel act/ect multiplier, etc, are not used in many of the newer strategys, you will see they are all set to “1” which means they are doing nothing. On some of the newer eecs used in 99+ mustangs they sometimes are used. You really don’t need fuel multipliers if you have a large enough maf meter that does’nt peg.
    Dashpot pre-position- amount of air needed to hold the rpms listed in the table. For instance, the car will “hang” at 1500 rpm when you let off the throttle, you need a certain amount of airflow through the isc valve to reach that rpm and the values reflect that.
    On my car I set the rpms and air values to zero so the rpms will drop faster.
    Dashpot clip 1,2,4-Amount of airflow for various rpms when you decelerate. Too much airflow causes the car to decel too slowly, too little makes it “shuffle”. 1,2 4 are the gears in the transmission.
    Dashpot decay rate-How quickly the air dissipates. Amount of “decay” Smaller numbers mean less “decay” and therefore a slower drop in rpms. On my car it seems to only effect rpm drop when the car is not moving, not when you decelerate.
    Neutral/Drive idle air flow-This is how much airflow is required to achieve idle rpm, etc. With bigger cams it helped to increase the air values a little to get a stable idle. The idea is to tell the isc valve how much air is needed to get the idle rpm you want. If it is wrong then the motor will over/undershoot the target rpm at first and take awhile to stabilize. On top of that, the eec will start adjusting timing at idle to try and reach the commanded idle speed. You are very close if the timing is stable at idle.
    All dashpot/isc settings are adaptive in eecv. If you try to change isc values once the car has been run awhile you may find your changes don’t “stick” due to adaptive isc. Just like fuel trims, clear KAM after making a change.
    Inj comp batt voltage- The fuel injectors are driven by battery voltage, therefore if alternator/battery voltage changes the injectors will flow more or less fuel and this needs to be compensated for. The values are multipliers, a value of “1” means no change in inj pw, lower numbers, .8 for instance, mean less inj pw, higher values mean more pw. This changes the inj. pw globally independent of inj size settings and maf values.
    MAF transfer function- The big one for most of us. Tells the eec how much fuel to use for a given amount of airflow injested by the engine. For a given voltage output from the maf meter a corresponding airflow value is assigned in kg/hr on my car. If you change the kg/hr values lower for instance then the eec will deliver less fuel, higher numbers mean more fuel.
    Use the 9 point flow sheet if you have a ProM meter and convert it to a 30pt curve using the editor in Caledit to get a maf curve to start with. Sometimes it will be very close, other times not. When tuning the curve there are two ways to do it. I prefer to use a wideband 02 sensor connected to Calcon so you can record a datalog and play it back later. Log Lambse, maf voltage, maf kg/hr and TP (throttle position). The commanded a/f ratios in your fuel stab OL table will be displayed in the Lambse display on Calcon so you can compare what a/f you are commanding vs what the wideband display says. You must force OL operation to do this which is shown in the next function.
    Where there is a difference between commanded a/f vs wideband display you need to take note at what maf voltage or kg/hr value the discrepancy is occurring and adjust your maf values that correspond to that range. Figure out the percentage of difference between the commanded and actual a/f ratios and apply that percentage, rich or lean, to the kg/hr values in the maf curve. Do this all along the curve.
    But first, before you do that, with the new maf curve calculated and entered see what your idle a/f ratio is. If it is really far off (lets say it is idling at 13.1 instead of 14.6) then reduce the inj pw globally using the inj batt comp voltage by reducing all the values in that function by some percentage until you get the correct a/f ratio at idle. This will avoid radically changing the maf curve values in an attempt to get the a/f right. From there you can adjust the maf values themselves to get the rest of the curve accurate.
    The main reason for doing it this way is because the assumption is that the new maf curve accurately reflects the new meters airflow capabilities. Secondly, and just as important, the airflow values in the maf curve tell the eec how much load to calculate, higher kg/hr values mean more engine load and therefore the eec looks at fuel/timing load tables to determine what fuel/spark to use. If you artificially lower the maf curve too much then the eec thinks the motor is under very low load and you could end up with too little fuel and too much timing. Not good on a blower car.
    The other way to adjust the maf curve is to log KAMRF (fuel trims) values and again, compare them to the maf kg/hr values that you are logging and adjust the curve to get the fuel trims to read as close to “1” as possible. “1” means there is no fuel being added or subtracted to reach a CL a/f ratio of 14.64-1. The eec has a 25% range of adjustment lean or rich to compensate for inaccuracies in a/f ratio. If you see a fuel trim of .8 for instance, that means the eec is pulling fuel by 20% to reach 14.7 a/f. You would reduce your corresponding maf kg/hr values by 20% to correct this. When you make changes to the maf curve to correct fuel trims values you need to reset the eec fuel trims by disconnecting the battery. This is called clearing the KAM. The fastest way to do this is to disconnect the battery cable then hold the brake pedal down for a few minutes. This will drain any backup or memory voltage stored in the eec and clear the fuel trims. Restart the car and drive for awhile to learn new fuel trims and see how close you are. You need to be in CL to use fuel trim information. This works up to about 2 volts on the maf curve, after that you tend to enter OL and will have to rely on the wideband anyway.
    Open loop vs load-This is a table that determines how much load is required before entering OL operation. Stock, a very high load (.8-.9) is needed at low rpms before going into OL. I reduced these to .5 at low rpms and gradually decreased the load necessary to go OL as rpms increase. If you want to force OL all the time just reduce the load values to zero and you will be in OL all the time once the car’s ect has reached operating temp (scalar is usually set to 180 ect t enter OL). The eec will NOT be in OL until the ect temp is reached. So a cold start will initially be OL for about 60 seconds then switch to CL until 180 degrees ect is reached. If you want OL all the time even when the motor is cold then reduce the ect for OL scalar to a very low value.
    Peak load at sealevel-This tells the eec how much load to “expect” at various rpms. On a blower car go ahead and increase it to 140% or higher according to your datalogs at the appropriate rpms. This will “fit” the loads you actually see on your combo within the .1-1 load ranges used in the fuel/spark tables so when you command a low spark value at high loads in the spark tables it will happen at the right loads.
    Spk retard for act/ect-Amount of spark retard/advance for ect/act.
    Time in run for CL-Amount of time depending on ect temps for when the eec will go to CL operation. On my car with longtubes the 02’s were not heating up enough on a cold start and needed more time to do so. The effect was shortly after startup, about 30 seconds, the a/f would go very rich and almost stall the motor, then gradually go lean towards normal. Increasing the time needed to go CL gave the 02’s time to heat up and avoid this problem.

    Checksum Base Address : This is Ford’s internal program checksum designed to verify that the original EEC program is correct. If set to 0 you disable the checksum and the fault code 15 ROM test failed is not displayed during a KOEO or KOER test of the EEC.
    WOT Voltage : This is Throttle Position voltage when the EEC goes into open loop. All WOT functions and scalars are read once the EEC goes into WOT. The EEC calculates WOT by TP_REL. To get TP_REL, the EEC takes the voltage at closed throttle when the key is turned on. It then takes this voltage and subtracts it from the actual voltage from the sensor to get voltage relative to closed throttle. This voltage is then converted into A/D counts from 0 to 1020.
    Example: The system shows .8 volts at closed throttle, and actual voltage from the sensor is 2.8 volts, subtract .8 from 2.8 and get 2 volts. You take 2volts/5 volts (the max possible voltage) and multiply by 1020. .4 X 1020 = 408 TP_REL counts. If you just remember to add the voltage at closed throttle (.8v) to the WOT_VOLTAGE 2.44144 you get WOT activated at 3.24144v
    Engine Displacement : Defines the cubic inch displacement of the engine. Increasing the engine size lowers the calculated engine load value. Engine Displacement, MAF Transfer, and Injector Size are all used by the EEC to calculate engine load.
    Global Spark Adder : This Scalar function allows ignition timing to be adjusted. Increasing this value above 0 advances ignition timing (Advance in .25 increments.) by adding additional amount of timing to the spark table values. This function is equivalent to advancing the crank sensor on DIS cars or advancing the distributor on non DIS cars.
    Max Spark Retard : This is the maximum amount of ignition timing the EEC pulls out of the engine when the knock sensor signals the EEC of detonation. The EEC pulls timing out in .25 degree increments. Setting this value to 0 will disable.
    Octane Plug Spark Adder : On DIS cars the octane plug is connected to the wiring harness near the MAF sensor. The Octane plug looks the same as the SPOUT connector so make sure you have the correct plug. Refer to you shop manual for correct EEC PIN.

    Tip in Retard : This is the maximum amount of ignition timing the EEC pulls out of the engine during shifts. The EEC pulls timing out in .25 degree increments. Setting this value to 0 will disable.
    Min Tip-in Spark : This is the minimum actual spark allowed during shifts and throttle tip-in. Set to 50 to ensure maximum spark is set and ignition advance is not removed.
    Base Spark Table : A higher number increases ignition advance and a lower number decreases ignition advance. Base and Altitude spark tables are used based on barometric pressure. Barometric pressure above 26in/hg and the EEC will use the Base Spark Table while a barometric pressure below 26in/hg will use the Altitude Spark Table. To configure spark set all 3 spark tables (Base, Alt, & BDS) to the same values. The spark tables are read in column’s top to bottom.

    Example: Assuming that you are using the stock X any Y normalizers, while waiting at the tree (drag racing) the vehicle is idling at 900 rpm. This puts the spark in column 0 (500rpm’s), at green, the engine accelerates to WOT. Before the rpm’s reach the next defined level in the Spark Table X normalizer, which is column 6 (2000rpm’s) the spark does not change. This is based on a 140% load from idle column 0 to column 6. Even though the table has 9 rows for spark it only reads what is defined in the X normalizer. In this case it is 2000rpm’s where the EEC will set the timing at 12 degrees and then column 8 (3000rpm’s) where will set timing at 20 degrees and so on.
    Base Altitude Spark : A higher number increases ignition advance and a lower number decreases ignition advance. Base and Altitude spark tables are used based on barometric pressure. Barometric pressure above 26in/hg and the EEC will use the Base Spark Table while a barometric pressure below 26in/hg will use the Altitude Spark Table. To configure spark set all 3 spark tables (Base, Alt, & BDS) to the same values.
     
    #5
  6. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    BDS) to the same values.

    Borderline Detonation Spark : Borderline Detonation Spark is a table that protects the engine from detonation by limiting total timing. To configure spark set all 3 spark tables (Base, Alt, & BDS) to the same values.

    Spark Table RPM Scaling : Spark Table X normalizer lists the RPM and Column number. Each table has 11 columns for spark 0-10. You can make custom X normalizers by changing the RPM and Column numbers. Column 0 is 500 rpm’s while Column 10 is 5000 rpm’s.

    Spark Table Load scaling : Spark Table Y normalizer lists the Load value (calculated by EEC) and Row number. Each table has 9 rows for spark 0-8. You can make custom Y normalizers by changing the Load and Row numbers. .149994 value is 15% load and 1.39999 Value is 140% load.
    Note: Engines making higher than 200% load should have the Engine Displacement increased to lower the calculated engine load.
    Stock Values Modified Values


    WOT 1-2 Shift Point : Change the rpm to increase the shift point at WOT. Each WOT shift point is different so you should try 500 rpm increments until you find the correct WOT shift rpm.

    WOT 2-3 Shift Point : Change the rpm to increase the shift point at WOT. Each WOT shift point is different so you should try 500 rpm increments until you find the correct WOT shift rpm.
    WOT 3-4 Shift Point : Change the rpm to increase the shift point at WOT. Each WOT shift point is different so you should try 500 rpm increments until you find the correct WOT shift rpm.
    ECT1 HS Fan ON : Turns the radiator high-speed fan on. Lowering the number causes the fan to come on sooner. Change in 1 degree increments.
    ECT2 HS Fan On : Turns the radiator high-speed fan on. Lowering the number causes the fan to come on sooner. Change in 1 degree increment
    ECT HS Fan Off : Turns the radiator high-speed fan off. Change this number so it is a few degrees lower than the High Speed ON temp. Change in 1 degree increments.
    ECT LS Fan ON : Turns the radiator low-speed fan off. Change this number so it is a few degrees lower than the Low Speed ON temp. Change in 1 degree increments.
    Engine Frictional Torque : Engine Friction Torque is used in conjunction with the Engine Torque table. Lower the value and it increases the transmission TV pressure at that load vs. RPM. Most transmission clutches slip under high load .75%-.90% so to increase line pressure under those conditions decrease the Engine Frictional value on those lines until needed TV line pressure is achieved. (Used on 4R70W transmission equipped cars only.)

    ECT LS Fan Off : Turns the radiator low-speed fan off. Change this number so it is a few degrees lower than the Low Speed ON temp. Change in 1 degree increments.
    Enable Stage 3 RPM Limiter : Engine RPM limit. Increase to 7000 to disable.
    Max Output Shaft Speed : Drive shaft speed in MPH. Change to 232 MPH to disable.
    Max Rpm Closed Throttle Idle : The idle maximum in RPM’s. Set to 0 to disable.
    First Gear Ratio : Represents the transmission first gear ratio on automatic equipped vehicles. Changing ratio higher or lower causes the transmission to shift sooner or later.
    Second Gear Ratio : Represents the transmission second gear ratio on automatic equipped vehicles. Changing ratio higher or lower causes the transmission to shift sooner or later.
    Third Gear Ratio : Represents the transmission third gear ratio on automatic equipped vehicles. Changing ratio higher or lower causes the transmission to shift sooner or later.
    Fourth Gear Ratio : Represents the transmission fourth gear ratio on automatic equipped vehicles. Changing ratio higher or lower causes the transmission to shift sooner or later.
    Note: When changing the differential gear ratio you will want to use the formula: new differential gear ratio (3.73)/stock differential gear ratio (3.31)= increase in ratio (1.12688) * transmission gear ratio (2.83997)= new first gear ratio (3.20032)
    Low Injector Slope : This value represents the size of injector installed. Set number to 30, 36, 38, 42, or 50 depending on the injector size you have installed.
    High Injector Slope : This value represents the size of injector installed. Set number to 30, 36, 38, 42, or 50 depending on the injector size you have installed.
    Note: Both Low and High Injector Slopes are different on stock calibrations. After upgrading the factory fuel pump to 190lph or 255lph you should set BOTH injector slopes to the same injector size.
    Neutral Idle : Idle RPM with transmission in Park, Neutral ( automatics) or Neutral ( manual).
    Drive Idle : Idle RPM with transmission in gear ( automatics). Set to same RPM as Neutral Idle on manual transmissions.
    Open Loop Fuel Multiplier : Global open loop fuel adder. Increase value over 1 to lower injector pulse width (less fuel) and decrease the number under 1 to increase the injector pulse width (more fuel) during open loop operation.
    EGR Type : Controls EGR operation, change EGR Type to 2 to disable operation. Disabling the EGR does not disable the EGR Vacuum Regulator or EGR Pressure Sensor.
    First Speed Limiter On : Turns rev limiter on when MPH is reached. Set to 232 to disable.
    First Speed Limiter Off : Turns rev limiter off when MPH is reached. Set to 232 to disable.
    Second Speed Limiter On : Turns rev limiter on when MPH is reached. Set to 232 to disable.
    Second Speed Limiter Off : Turns rev limiter off when MPH is reached. Set to 232 to disable.
    Half Fuel Limiter On : Turns rev limiter on when RPM is reached. Set to 7000 to disable.
    Half Fuel Limiter Off : Turns rev limiter off when RPM is reached. Set to 7000 to disable.
    Neutral Stage 2 RPM Limiter : Turns rev limiter on when RPM is reached. Set to 7000 to disable.
    Neutral Stage 3 RPM Limiter : Turns rev limiter on when RPM is reached. Set to 7000 to disable.
    SIL PRM ON : Turns on SIL (Shift Indicator Light) rev limiter. Set to 7000 to disable. The Thunderbird SC SIL will light and an audible chime will sound under the following conditions: • Key in RUN, engine off. • At high vehicle speeds when engine speed is too high for the transmission gear selected: Greater than 93 mph (4000 rpm) in 3rd gear for A/T. Greater than 121 mph (4300 rpm) in 4th gear for M/T. At the same time the SIL and chime are activated at high speed, the Power train Control Module (PCM) will take action to prevent engine damage from overheating. If coolant gets too hot, or 60 seconds elapse at high speeds, the PCM will shut off three injectors until a safe operating speed is reached or transmission is up shifted to top gear.
    SIL RPM OFF : RPM at which the engine rev-limiter is turned off. Once SIL is activated RPM’s will have to drop to SIL RPM OFF, before acceleration can occur again. Set to 7000 to disable.
    PIP : Lower number gives a higher rev limit.
    Set PIP to 858 to set rev limit to 7000 PIP = 6006250/maxRPM maxRPM = 6006250/PIP PIP = 961 maxRPM = 6006250/961= 6250 RPMs
    The PIP is a sample rate frequency that limits the PCM program operating loop to a minimum rate. If the loop is sampled less then PIP times within one operating cycle (2 crankshaft revolutions), the PCM limits rpm.
    MAF Voltage : Maximum Mass Air voltage recognized by the EEC for calculating air flow into the engine.
    MAF Function : MAF Function Hotwire type sensor, the actual "hotwires" taking the form of film type semiconductor resistors. On 89-93 Thunderbird SC’s the EEC-IV processor speed was 12mhz while the 94-95 Thunderbird SC’s used a 15mhz processor. Ford used a 55mm MAF on 89-91 Supercoupes then changed to a 70mm MAF for the 92-95 years. All 89-91 55mm MAF can be replaced with the larger 70mm MAF used on the 92-95 Supercoupes. Essentially the sensor consists of two semiconductor film resistor elements connected together in "half bridge" configuration so that the same current passes through both. The circuit is supplied with a constant voltage. One of the elements is exposed to the intake airflow the other is shielded from the flow. The purpose of the second element is to provide temperature compensation. The current passing through both resistors heats them both reducing the resistance however the cooling effect of the airflow on the exposed element has the opposite effect. As a result the voltage at the point in the circuit between the resistors will increases with increasing airflow. MAF transfer table lists voltage then kg/hour (airflow rate ). Increase the voltage or increase the kg/hour number to increase load calculation. Decrease the voltage or decrease the kg/hour number to decrease load calculation. Changes to the MAF table are not usually necessary unless your fuel injectors are insufficient or you have a MAF installed for a different injector size.
    (Note: To check fuel injector millisecond pulse using a Ford diagnostic NGS or equivalent the ms injector pulse should be no more than 25ms WOT at 4,000rpm’s.) If you choose to use a different MAF calibration you can modify the MAF Transfer Function to match the flow curve of the new MAF. Using the flow sheet that came with the MAF you can change the voltage and KG/HR values to match the new meter.
     
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  7. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    The above chart shows the difference between the Stock SC MAF curve and the 99 Lighting MAF curve. To use the 99 Lighting MAF or another MAF on a Supercoupe we have to address the limitations of the EEC-IV processor. The 94-95 Supercoupe EEC-IV processor is capable of only processing up to 1,700kg/hr MAX. The 89-93 Supercoupe processors are only capable of processing up to 1,400kg/hr. A 3.8L SC engine making 400hp on a dynamometer will use about 1,500kg/hr while the 94-95 SC processor is capable of supporting the higher kg/hr values needed the 89-93 processors are not. To get around this limitation in the 89-93 processor you multiply the following: MAF kg/hr values, Engine displacement, & Injector values by a factor of .65 to reduce the MAF kg/hr numbers below 1,400kg/hr. Example: 1,565kg/hr multiplied by .65 is 1017kg/hr. The engine displacement for the 3.8L SC is 231.728 so by multiplying this number by .65 we have 150.6232 . The Injector values should both have the same slopes. LOW_INJECTOR_SLOPE & HIGH_INJECTOR_SLOPE would both have the same injector value. For example: you have 50lb injectors you would multiply the value of 50 by .65 to get 32.5. These three: MAF kg/hr values, Engine displacement, & Injector value calculate the Engine Load the EEC-IV uses for Fuel and Timing tables.

    WOT Fuel Multiplier Vs RPM : First number is RPM and second number is multiplier. Increase multiplier value of 1 to decrease injector pulse width (less fuel) and decrease the number under 1 to increase the injector pulse width (more fuel). You can also change the RPM value to add or remove fuel at any RPM. Note: The EEC calculates WOT by TP_REL. To get TP_REL, the EEC takes the voltage at closed throttle when the key is turned on. It then takes this voltage and subtracts it from the actual voltage from the sensor to get voltage relative to closed throttle. This voltage is then converted into A/D counts from 0 to 1020. If you have .8 volts at closed throttle, and actual voltage from the sensor is 2.8 volts, you subtract .8 from 2.8 and get 2 volts. You take 2volts/5 volts (the max possible voltage) and multiply by 1020. In this example, you get .4 X 1020 or 408 TP_REL counts. If you just remember to add the voltage at closed throttle (.8v) to the WOT_VOLTAGE 2.44144 you get WOT activated at 3.24144v.

    WOT Advance Vs RPM : The first number is RPM and the second is timing advance. This table sets the minimum spark during WOT operation. This table is compared to the spark tables and the lower value will be used. This table is used when the TPS voltage reaches 3 volts or higher.

    Accelerator Pump Vs TP Voltage : The first number is TP voltage and the second is accelerator multiplier. Increase value over 1 to decrease injector pulse width (less fuel) and decrease the number under 1 to increase the injector pulse width (more fuel). To disable set Multiplier to all 1’s. Note: Once the TP_REL voltage reaches 2.44141 volts additional fuel pulse width is added.

    Accelerator Pump Fuel Table : A higher number adds more fuel.

    Fuel Crank Pulse width Vs ECT : First number is ECT and the second number is injector pulse width. This table determines how much the fuel injector pulses while the engine is cranking. To compensate for larger injector use the following formula:

    Stock Values (30lb) Modified Values (36lb) Stock injector size (30)/new injector size (36)= decrease in ratio (0.83333) * crank fuel pulse width (0.00256348)= new crank fuel pulse width (0.00213623)
    Exhaust Pulse Delay : Increase the numbers higher for long tube headers. Changes the injector timing calculations. Currently no formula is known for corrected values with long tube headers on Supercoupes.

    Closed Throttle Open Loop Multiplier : First number is RPM and second number is multiplier. Increase multiplier value of 1 to decrease injector pulse width (less fuel) and decrease the number under 1 to increase the injector pulse width (more fuel). You can also change the RPM value to add or remove fuel at any RPM.
    Dynamic 1-2 TV Pressure Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is TV pressure. Increase the TV pressure number to add more line pressure during 1-2 shifts.
    Dynamic 2-3 Tv Pressure Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is TV pressure. Increase the TV pressure number to add more line pressure during 2-3 shifts.
    Dynamic 2-1 TV Pressure Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is TV pressure. Increase the TV pressure number to add more line pressure during 2-1 shifts.
    Dynamic 3-2 TV Pressure Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is TV pressure. Increase the TV pressure number to add more line pressure during 3-2 shifts.
    Second Gear TC lockup : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to lock torque converter clutch in second gear.
    Third Gear TC lockup : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to lock torque converter clutch in third gear.
    Fourth Gear TC lockup : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to lock torque converter clutch in fourth gear.
    1-2 Part Throttle Up shift Speed Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to change part throttle 1-2 up shift.
    3-4 Part Throttle Up shift Speed Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to change part throttle 3-4 up shift.
    2-3 Part Throttle Up shift Speed Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to change part throttle 2-3 up shift.
    2-1 Part Throttle Downshift Speed Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to shift part throttle 2-1 downshift.
    3-2 Part Throttle Downshift Speed Vs TP : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to shift part throttle 3-2 downshift.
    4-3 Part Throttle Downshift Speed Vs Tp : First number is throttle position (TP) voltage and second number is MPH. Increase or decrease the MPH to shift part throttle 4-3 downshift.
    Spark Adder ECT : Table is not used. You can add spark using this table.
    WOT Advance Vs ECT : The first number is engine coolant temp (ECT) and the second is ignition timing in degrees that is added or removed.
    WOT Advance Vs ACT : The first number is air charge temp (ACT) and the second is ignition timing in degrees that is added or removed between temperatures.
    Advance Vs BP : The first number is barometric pressure and the second is ignition timing in degrees that is added or removed.
    Advance Rate Vs RPM : First number is RPM and the second is ignition advance rate. Increase the advance rate in .25 increments.
    Dashpot Clip : This is the same as in carbureted cars. Dashpot controls how much the airflow increases as the RPM drop.
    Spark Adder Vs RPM : The first number is RPM and the second is additional timing advance. Similar to the Global Spark Adder as it adds additional spark advance. Increase the spark adder number and increase the ignition timing at that RPM. Change the RPM value and change when spark is added.
    Spark Adder Load : The first number is Load and the second is additional timing advance. Add spark advance based on EEC load calculations. Increase the timing advance number and increase the ignition timing at that load. Change the load value and change when spark is added.
    Stabilized OL Air Fuel Ratio : A higher number decreases fuel delivery and a lower number increases fuel delivery. Each column lists the fuel ratio for that ECT.

    Example: The ECT is between 180-209 degrees. While tuning the car on a dynamometer using a wide band 02 sensor you will see 120% to 140% load during the run. You decide a A/F ratio of 11 or 11 to 1 is a better ratio so to change the Engine A/F of row 180 (shaded) from 12 @120% and 12 @140% to a richer A/F ratio of 11 for 120% and 140% load. If the engine has a lean spot at say part throttle you can change the A/F ratio in the 60%, 75%, and 90% to a richer setting so the engine does not lean under boost. To really get the A/F dialed in you should be using a Wide Band 02 sensor during your tuning to verify the accuracy. To connect the wide band 02 sensor to the exhaust you may remove one of the stock 02 sensors and screw in the wide band 02 in its place. Once the car is started you will have to wait about 2 min before the engine turns that 02 sensor off and throws a check engine code. Don’ t worry about the check engine code during the dynamometer run as WOT runs switch the EEC into open loop anyway.
    Startup OL Air Fuel Ratio : A higher number increases fuel delivery and a lower number decreases fuel delivery.

    Base Open Loop Fuel Table : A higher number decreases fuel delivery and a lower number increases fuel delivery.

    Spark Adder Vs ECT : Increasing the number will add ignition advance and a negative number will retard ignition advance.

    Engine Torque Table : Calculates transmission line pressure based on Engine Torque (lb-ft). Max value is 512. Higher number increases TV line pressure at that load vs. RPM. (Used on 4R70W transmission equipped cars only.)
     
    #7
  8. BlueOvalStangGT

    BlueOvalStangGT Active Member

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    Ill continue updating this and organizing it a little better later, im going to Hooters for now.... TO BE UPDATED!
     
    #8
  9. 95conv5.0

    95conv5.0 New Member

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  10. codemonkey

    codemonkey Hungrymonkey's helper monkey

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    I've hosted it here so there is no rapidshare stuff.

    PM if you want a newer version up there. Good work!
     
    #10
  11. MisterCMK

    MisterCMK Member

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    I also re-hosted it Here
     
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  12. Methodical

    Methodical Active Member

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    Clearing KAMs Tip

    A more efficient and easier way to clear KAMS without disconnecting the battery and wasting your precious tuning time is to load a bad tune in 1 of the 4 positions. Example - I use the J4J1 tune but I have an a9L tune loaded in the No. 4 position. So everytime I want to clear KAMS I turn the key on car not running and switch to the No. 4 position - the fuel pump willl prime and the fan will run - BAM, the KAMS are cleared. I've used this method since I've gotten the TwEECer and never had to disconnect the battery. [​IMG]

    CAUTION: Some put the bad tune in the No. 1 position as a theft deterrent and remove the switch. I highly, highly recommend against doing this because if for any reason the TwEECer switch is lost or damaged it defaults to the No. 1 tune. Guess what, if you have the bad tune in the No. 1 position, you can't drive your car without removing the TwEECer from the computer. :nono:
     
    #12
  13. zenboy99

    Founding Member

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    You can also just take the negative battery cable and touch the positive one, I've seen many Ford techs do this. Just make sure you don't have a bucket of gas sitting around.
     
    #13
  14. BoostedSN95

    Founding Member

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    question about the first post:

    In the quote above the current value of the spark min for tip in retard is 5, before it say the value should be 15 or higher. What am I missing?
     
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  15. BoostedSN95

    Founding Member

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    anyone know??
     
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  16. The Green GT

    The Green GT No 13 year olds are safe around me.

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    I plan on getting a twEECer soon, and this is helping me understand what Im getting into alot more than I did. Thanks. :nice:


    Im sure Ill have TONS of questions when I get mine. :rlaugh:
     
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  17. Cougar5.O

    Founding Member

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  18. final5-0

    final5-0 Mustang Master

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    How to remove the spark retard between shifts.
    Under the Scalars tab locate spark_min_for_tip-in_retard, the current value in this cell should be 5. You should change this to whatever value you feel comfortable with. I typically set it to whatever my total spark advance is. The blower and NOS guys should use some caution here as whatever value you input, the value you enter here will be your total spark advance for about 3/10th's of a second during any shift, even powershifting


    The paragraph above is ... very much ... so misleading :(

    I'd like to offer more info :)

    First of all ... Lets call the scalar by its C O R R E C T name
    and
    Its name is based upon its actual operation

    The name is ... spark minimum for tip-in retard

    Notice the word ... SHIFT ... was not included anywhere in that name :D

    Briefly ... When you are in a near closed throttle position at a steady
    cruise and you go to full throttle, (tip-in) you will see a spark value
    of 5 degrees for .25-.50 of a second with an unmodified 94-95 pcm.

    Again ... Notice shifting gears was not included here :Word:

    True ... if you back off to closed or near to closed throttle while
    shifting and then go to full throttle for the next gear ... you will
    evoke the retard.

    But ... During a power shift ...

    There would no tip in of the throttle :nono:
    thus
    No retard in that situation :)

    A simple way to render the retard ineffective ... if you have pcm access ...

    Match the value of spark in the scalar with the value of spark you
    have chosen for normal WOT operation.

    Grady
     
    #18
  19. stinnette

    stinnette New Member

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  20. BlownFiveLiter

    BlownFiveLiter have car, will race....wait, it doesn't run

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    Hey Tony, you should have mail from matt.nelson at stangnet dot com, if it got filtered into your spam. I e-mailed you the Word document that was originally available here.
     
    #20

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