Vacuum splitting on Explorer Intake

Fox86

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Nov 9, 2020
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Hi together,

currently I am starting to switch from the original intake to the Explorer intake. First picture below shows the Explorer intake. On the left top there is the connection for the MAP and below the main vacuum port. As you can see on the original port there is the vacuum tree to feed all necessary vacuum ports.

My question: How can I now do it with the Explorer intake without any additional machining? I need to have the same amount of connections like before. Is it possible also to use vacuum from the MAP? For example with a vacuum T connector between the MAP?

How did you realize this? Any ideas for me?

Thanks in advance
Felix

tempImageQBcsbZ.jpg

tempImageT0IDUM.jpg
 
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Mustang5L5

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Note, those two stubby connectors from the side of the short port on the left hand side are for coolant. They are not needed on the Mustang
 

Fox86

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Not sure which one you mean. I know that link already, thanks! This is how I plan to do - the two short connectors next to the PCV connection I will plug.

The question is how can I get now all the vacuum ports feeded without any machining? In the link you provided somebody added the vacuum tree...let´s say I don't have the possibility..

Thanks!
 

Mustang5L5

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These two are coolant.

1609770769572.png


Your only other solution is Tee fittings. It will be quite messy though. Your charcoal canister, and your fuel pressure regulator need their own dedicated vac source, as anything that gas should be plumbed independently of your other vac sources. In a pinch you could put it together using the same Tees though.

MAP should really have it's own dedicated vac source straight to the manifold as well. On a Speed Density car this is usually one of the most important sensors. The car will run though with it sourced elsewhere. I ran my MAP sensor to the main vac tree for a while when I didn't have a MAP sensor port drilled on a 93 Cobra intake.

Not the ideal setup, but it might work fine.

Is there a machine shop locally that can drill/tap these ports for NPT so you can install the metal vac tree on the intake?
 

Fox86

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Thanks for the feedback! Is it enough to put some vac caps on the coolant lines or what do you suggest?

Concerning machine shop, it seems to be the best solution to make the 3/8 NPT for the vac tree. Is of course not a good position for drilling...I will check out.

Last question: How are the current pipes/tubes fixed and how to get it out best of the Explorer intake?

Regards
Felix
 

Mustang5L5

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The current vac tubes are just pressed in. If you grab them with a pair of channel locks or pliers and twist, they will come right out. Not much holding them in.
 
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Mustang5L5

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You can. Make sure it's completely dry inside to prevent rust, but likely if it's been open for a while it is. You can even leave them open.
 
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markinms

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Slightly related questions please.

For those who installed the explorer intake AND 65mm throttle body, did you have to upgrade your stock MAF sensor for this setup to run well. I've had performance issues (cutting out at higher rpms) since I upgraded.

The stock Mustang upper intake is recessed where the EGR spacer mounts to it. The Explorer upper intake is not recessed, but has a perfectly smooth mounting surface. Would this affect performance in any way?

Thanks for your feedback!
Mark
 

Mustang5L5

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No. No changes to how it ran.

is your explorer intake the EGR version? It’s also possible you have a vac leak or slipped intake gasket during the install
 

markinms

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Yep, the intake is the EGR version (came from a 96 Explorer).

I've got everything off right now. Will be following the vacuum routing info provided above and make changes as needed. New gaskets should take care of any potential issues in that area.
 

Fox86

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If it's a vac problem, I would expect that it is not only at higher RPM...

I will go ahead with my 75 throttle body and ERG spacer, even tough it is not necessary, but these are the parts I have. The MAF conversion will take place, when the Explorer intake is running well.
 

Mike62

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Oct 23, 2019
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Slightly related questions please.

For those who installed the explorer intake AND 65mm throttle body, did you have to upgrade your stock MAF sensor for this setup to run well. I've had performance issues (cutting out at higher rpms) since I upgraded.

The stock Mustang upper intake is recessed where the EGR spacer mounts to it. The Explorer upper intake is not recessed, but has a perfectly smooth mounting surface. Would this affect performance in any way?

Thanks for your feedback!
Mark
I had the same high rpm cut out. Only happened if I mashed the throttle, smooth acceleration to redline still worked fine. Try clocking the MAF sensor (rotate it so the electronics sit at different positions) and see if it helps. I had a reman sensor from a '95 mustang that my car did not like no matter what position it was in. My stock sensor did work with the explorer intake and 65mm throttle body. If your air filter sits right on the MAF, or there is a curve right before air enters the MAF, this can sometimes cause problems as well. I have also seen people use a section of screen material ahead of the MAF to straighten out the air before it goes through the sensor.
 

markinms

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Thanks for the info. Glad to learn your stock MAF sensor worked with explorer intake and 65mm throttle body. My K&N air filter does attach to the MAF housing so I'll be adding a section of screen material to see if it helps.

Mark
 

Mike62

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Oct 23, 2019
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Thanks for the info. Glad to learn your stock MAF sensor worked with explorer intake and 65mm throttle body. My K&N air filter does attach to the MAF housing so I'll be adding a section of screen material to see if it helps.

Mark
If it still doesn't work, consider upgrading to a quality aftermarket MAF. It's one part I would not cheap out on, too critical for good drivability. I ended up with a C&L 80mm, because I got it cheap and have a supercharger now.
 

markinms

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For anyone who drilled & tapped for vacuum ports on the upper intake manifold, as shown in this pic, what did you do to limit the debris created from drilling & tapping the manifold? I'm concerned about any crap going inside.

Thanks!

Explorer Intake vac line diagram.jpg
 

Mustang5L5

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In that case, stuff a rag in each side of the port, but not under where you are drilling to avoid catching the bit in it. Use lubricant on the drill bit and tap, and that will keep the shavings contained. Once done, shop vac out, or use compressed air to blow it out. You can push a rag through like a swatch down a gun barrel as well to clear out any debris